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Since apple started seeding the new build of Leopard, and october coming closer and closer, I thought I should ask this question.

I have never bought a brand new OS. I was about a year late from switching Windows 2000 to XP (our computer was to crappy:lmao:), and I finally switched to OS X about 1 month before Leopard was announced.

I was just wondering, for those Mac veterans... if Apple OS releases will be somewhat the same as Windows Vista...buggy and not compatible with most previous apps. All apps I have installed I use every single day and don't want to get screwed out of using them.

Anywho..my real quesiton is... How long after the release of Leopard is it "safe" to buy it? From previous versions of OS, have there been big problems when the newer versions were released, or is Apple good enough to have all major bugs and compatibility problems worked out before release?
 

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I have bought every release of OS X from the beginning. Things have only gotten better with every upgrade. I cant think of any major software bugs that happened while upgrading to the newest OS. I am in the graphic design field and have not had any issues with any of the software I use. I feel very safe upgrading to the latest Mac OS.
 

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If all you're worried about is program compatibility, then you can probably upgrade the first day that Leopard is released; the difference between OS X upgrades and Windows upgrades is that Apple is not modifying the kernel significantly from OS release to OS release, so program compatibility is not an issue. Microsoft got into trouble with the 9x to 2000/NT/XP upgrade, and again to Vista, cause they were rewriting the kernel each time.

If, however, you have some funky off-shoot USB devices, I believe there have been minor issues with some peripherals not working post-upgrade.

You should be fine - particularly if the apps you depend on are "main stream".

Alternatively, you can wait a month, check these forums, and then proceed. If there are any apps you're particularly concerned about, check the Apple discussion forums or as an ehMac'er here before upgrading.
 

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What makes you think Apple "seeded" anything?


Since apple started seeding the new build of Leopard, and october coming closer and closer, I thought I should ask this question.

I have never bought a brand new OS. I was about a year late from switching Windows 2000 to XP (our computer was to crappy:lmao:), and I finally switched to OS X about 1 month before Leopard was announced.

I was just wondering, for those Mac veterans... if Apple OS releases will be somewhat the same as Windows Vista...buggy and not compatible with most previous apps. All apps I have installed I use every single day and don't want to get screwed out of using them.

Anywho..my real quesiton is... How long after the release of Leopard is it "safe" to buy it? From previous versions of OS, have there been big problems when the newer versions were released, or is Apple good enough to have all major bugs and compatibility problems worked out before release?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What makes you think Apple "seeded" anything?
Apple Releases Leopard 9A466 (WWDC Build) to ADC Members
Monday July 02, 2007 09:43 PM EST
Posted by arn

Apple is finally seeding the WWDC version of Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard) to online ADC members (Select or Premier). Previously, the most recent version of Leopard was only available to developers who attended WWDC.



Apple previewed a "feature complete" version of Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard) at WWDC and demonstrated many of the new Leopard features, including new Desktop, Finder, Quicklook, Time Machine, Spaces and more.

The version being distributed is the exact same build as the one distributed on DVD to WWDC members. Leopard is expected to be released in October of this year.


Just reading that on macrumors brought the topic in my noggin :)

Thanks everyone.
 

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Ah, a slightly different meaning of "seeding" came to mind. As you know, Apple "seeded" previous versions and may seed future versions--to its own developers and participants, so you could ask the question at several junctures.

But it doesn't matter much. I think whatever your behaviour has been in the past it isn't likely to change. Early adopters will get Leopard right away, and 99% won't have problems. People who wait for xx.0.1 or xx.0.2 will wait. I bet your experience in the past has determined the answer. I'll have my copy in October.
 

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I'd say if you use your machine as a work machine, then you should avoid the OS update until you have a day or two to devote to it. First, there can be bugs or problems just like any update, there is always a chance for something to go wrong. Second there can be required updates to your existing software. Most likely minor updates.

I'll probably buy it within a week or two of it's release and start with my most unimportant computer - my laptop - and then update my desktop, after backing it up to my external HD.
 

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If all you're worried about is program compatibility, then you can probably upgrade the first day that Leopard is released; the difference between OS X upgrades and Windows upgrades is that Apple is not modifying the kernel significantly from OS release to OS release, so program compatibility is not an issue. Microsoft got into trouble with the 9x to 2000/NT/XP upgrade, and again to Vista, cause they were rewriting the kernel each time.
If you run a fair bit of system hacks and extensions (i.e. SIMBL plug-ins, APE Modules, InputManager Extensions - and speaking of system hacks, I remember reading on Infinite Loop at Ars Technica that Apple is most likely going to be dropping InputManager Extensions in 10.5) then you'll definitely want to hold off a little while, at least until compatibility fixes are released. Specialized utilities like DiskWarrior or Parallels may also have to be upgraded, and many games may need fixes too. Apple may not be rewriting the kernel, but usually there are enough under-the-hood changes to break certain apps.

If you remember, the initial 10.3 and 10.4 releases were marred with some pretty galling issues, like FileVault not working right. I'd really suggest holding off until at least a .1 or a .2 release, at least to avoid the usual catastrophes like losing your home folder.

However, if you've got a spare machine where you can afford to have something like that happen, go ahead, be our guest. :)
 

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You buy a new OS when you NEED a new OS. When a new program you purchase needs the newer OS, that is when you buy. Otherwise, leave well enough alone!

If it ain't broke, don't fix it!
 

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You buy a new OS when you NEED a new OS. When a new program you purchase needs the newer OS, that is when you buy. Otherwise, leave well enough alone!

If it ain't broke, don't fix it!
That's exactly what I do and I think it makes a lot of sense.

I stayed on OS 9.2 while people were struggling with the first release of OS X.

Then I moved to OS 10.2 when some of the apps I wanted were not available on OS 9, but I made a lot of use of Classic to run OS 9 applications.

Then there seemed to be another 'breakpoint' with apps when the minimum release many would run on was 10.3.9; at that point I jumped to 10.4.3 and then to 10.4.8.

Surprisingly (compared to my Windows machine at least), my Mac ran faster and better each time I upgraded OS whereas my Windows machine slowed down with each upgrade.

A couple of month ago I took the final step and decided to move to Apple mail from Outlook mail in Classic. Tried the switch a few years ago, but Apple mail would always get hung up trying to import my Outlook mail. Not this time - everything went like a charm (I had well over a Gig of mail I moved, and although there is one feature in Outlook mail that I miss in Apple mail, overall Apple mail works much better and faster.
 

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......I have never bought a brand new OS. \
Chicken! :)

I've loaded up every new Mac OS version as soon as I could get my hands on it, from System 7.0 up to OS X 10.4.0.

I have never had serious problems from a new Mac OS. I have known lots of people who have had serious problems caused by clinging to old OS versions, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Chicken! :)

I've loaded up every new Mac OS version as soon as I could get my hands on it, from System 7.0 up to OS X 10.4.0.

I have never had serious problems from a new Mac OS. I have known lots of people who have had serious problems caused by clinging to old OS versions, though.
hey now..thats not very nice :p

Started on Windows 95..then 2000, but since I was kind of young then..and cared more about catching frogs with my bestfriend at the local pond..and playing N64..quite frankly I didn't care what OS our computer was running.

Only got XP a year late because our (when we bought it) $2000 HP P.O.C. couldn't handle it.

And since you guys cleared up the compatibility question I had...I will be buying Leopard when it comes out. :)
 

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I may be buying a new system on an "as-wanted" basis. I can afford to wait until I get Leopard for free. Historically, at what point does Apple begin offering free upgrades ot the next OS as part of the package? 30 days? 60?
 

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There are 3 reasons to update a system.

The first is a real motivator; some piece of software you really like or even need, simply will not run on your current system.

Second; Apple actually developed a bell or whistle that would be useful to you. For me the colored label feature was reason enough to abandon Jaguar and move to Panther. The faster boots were just a bonus. Tiger's bells and whistles (Spotlight and Dashboard) have inspired me to keep using Panther.

Third unlike MS; performance improves as you go from 10.2 to 10.3 to 10.4 and so on, assuming you have enough RAM and a good enough video card.

The system also bloats, so at some point your Hard Drive becomes a limiting factor.
 

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If you want to maintain program compatibility, it's best bet to wait for 10.5.1 and watch the apps for Leopard compatibility updates. Apple is worse than Microsoft for breaking backwards compatibility - but this has allowed Apple to make developers move forward. (There are several essays on this around the web - one by Joel on Software was particularly good on the two different ideologies.)

That said, my masochistic love of being on the bleeding edge means I'll be running Leopard as soon as I can.

If you run a fair bit of system hacks and extensions (i.e. SIMBL plug-ins, APE Modules, InputManager Extensions - and speaking of system hacks, I remember reading on Infinite Loop at Ars Technica that Apple is most likely going to be dropping InputManager Extensions in 10.5)
I haven't read any other reports to corroborate this. Have there been any others?
 
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