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Discussion Starter #1
Ok this is the scenario Steve Jobs decided to retirees: and left apple :( (most of us would cry when the day comes):( his position at apple is left to you:clap:. with a recommendation by Steve jobs and approval of the board of directors let’s pretend I don’t want any reason why you can’t be. You have all of apples vast resources and power what would you do in other words what’s your Perfect Apple :lmao: would you use your power for good or evil beejacon

Oh and death/terrorist threats against Microsoft or Bill Gates Assassinations unless really funny :lmao:

Personally I would build more apple stores in Canada
 

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peek-a-boo
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I'd buy adobe.
 

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Tritium Glow
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I'd have a red phone with a direct line to the "retired" Steve and a big spotlight that would shine a big Apple logo into the sky....just in case.

It's hard to compete with a guy like Jobs...visionary, surrounds himself with the best talent in innovation and design, was there from the beginning, knows everything there is to know about Silicon Valley, has a cult like personality....frig, it'll be tough replacing that dude.
 

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I would do the following, in part:

1. Have a whole department of people dedicated to going onto boards like this, and then figuring out what issues people are having with the current products, evaluate them for validity/relevance (i.e. is this just one person, or does it indicate a wider problem), and have that department issue fix requests to the other departments responsible for the solutions, and track them down, or evaluate them for future release if patches to fix the issue are not possible.

2. Beef up the security of both OSes (OSX/iOS) as much as possible. Part of the reason that the Mac and the iDevices have been increasing in volume is because of the perception that they are a lot more secure than the alternatives. If this perception changes for the worse, it will impact sales long term. I want to eliminate that possibility entirely.

3. Allow all exclusivity agreements to finish, and then not sign any more. Tying yourself to a particular company (AT&T in the US) is not a good way to do business, especially if the other company is not that well liked by the general population in the first place. Why would I allow the sales of my product to be only through one company, when two or more could be selling them (ie. T-Mobile in the US along with AT&T currently, with Verizon to be added when 4G/LTE arrive)?

4. I would want to bulk up engineering resources, on both the hardware and software sides. The software side would need help due to the added software fixes and security patches (see parts 1 & 2, above), and the hardware side for increased integration on the IC side, and for things like RF testing. While I do think that the Antennagate issue on the iPhone 4 is overblown by a considerable degree, there is no doubt in my mind that the iPhone doesn't have the best RF performance out there, and that many future devices will have 3G/4G capability. I would like to have my devices be at the top of the RF performance curve to the degree possible. I would need a lot of sharp RF designers to make that come about.

5. Do a lot of long term thinking on where I would want the product lines to go. On the Mac side, I would want to map out a long term hardware and software (after 10.7, then what?) strategy. On the iPhone side, I would want to review the supply chain strategy aloing with future roadmaps. The current production rates on the iPhone and iPad are limiting both device penetration and sales/profits. I would really like to examine why this is going on, and how to go about addressing this issue. I would also like to rethink the iPod and its future.

Kostas
 

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1. Have a whole department of people dedicated to going onto boards like this, and then figuring out what issues people are having with the current products, evaluate them for validity/relevance (i.e. is this just one person, or does it indicate a wider problem), and have that department issue fix requests to the other departments responsible for the solutions, and track them down, or evaluate them for future release if patches to fix the issue are not possible.
How do you know this isn't already being done?


2. Beef up the security of both OSes (OSX/iOS) as much as possible.
While not perfect, this has already been done.


3. Allow all exclusivity agreements to finish, and then not sign any more. Tying yourself to a particular company (AT&T in the US) is not a good way to do business, especially if the other company is not that well liked by the general population in the first place.
Most iPhone users love AT&T - Jul. 23, 2010

Just because you think something is true doesn't actually make it true. :)

For my own part, AT&T has been perfectly fine for me (WAY better than Sprint, the company I was with before). I lived in Orlando, traveled throughout Florida, then moved to Victoria passing through most of the big cities of the eastern seaboard, and midwest. Even today, I only need to go about four blocks that way to the seashore to pick up the US signal from Port Angeles WA (26 miles away) strong enough to make calls when I change out my SIM.

I've had no complaints really, and I'm not convinced that Verizon or T-Mobile or anyone else would be any better really (certain areas where they have better coverage excepted).

Broadly speaking, however, I don't mean to express any disagreement with the notion that multiple carriers would be A Good Thing. As I recall, the reason AT&T and Apple developed an exclusive was a) co-development on Visual Voicemail and b) to lower the initial cost by making it exclusive.

there is no doubt in my mind that the iPhone doesn't have the best RF performance out there
I have yet to see any test -- even by sources traditionally hostile to Apple -- that agrees with you on this point. The consensus is very broad that Apple's antenna is the best out there at the moment.

5. Do a lot of long term thinking on where I would want the product lines to go.
Do you seriously believe this doesn't occur, or are you just saying you'd continue what Apple is already doing?
 

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Chas-m:

This is what I would do. IF you would do differently, so be it. I didn't think this was something that was a matter of right or wrong, just a fun, what is your opinion/idea of what is going on.

In terms of what Apple is doing online, I don't know, you don't either. So for you to immediately assume that they are, or that they are not, is equally invalid. If they actually did have a full, see what the online customers are saying department, we'd already have a small Macintosh with at least one, possibly two, PCI-E slots in the model line up.

The response time to the current Autofill security gap was disappointing. While it appears that Apple responded about a week after the security gap was revealed, they knew a month before publication that the gap was there. This should not have ever been in the tech press, as Apple should have had it fixed weeks ago.

AT&T is still having a lot of coverage issues in places like San Francisco and New York. That is why they send out statements like this:

AT&T begins rolling out coverage improvement to the areas you people reported

Even if they had the best coverage, doesn't change the fact that it is a good idea to not rely on only one company to get your product out into the marketplace. In addition, AT&T's current revision of their data plans has more than a few people upset, and if anything, the iPhone (along with Android, and Palm WebOS) is a device that is pretty much tied to the ability to have 3G coverage. AT&T just increased the cost of that coverage for high volume users.

Take your iPhone, any generation, into a fringe area. Also bring a normal, dumb (i.e. non-smartphone) with you. Keep walking away from the tower. See which phone gets to no service first. In my case, my Sony Ericsson K790a (3-4 years old) outperforms my iPhone 3G rather easily. Nokia dumb phones do the same. I want the iPhone/iDevices to have better, the same, or close to the same. performance as the dumb phones.

I don't know what Apple does internally in terms of long term product planning, I'm sure that they do a lot of it. I was just outlining what "I" would do. It may be exactly the same as what Apple is doing now. It may be nothing like what Apple is doing now. I don't know either way, nor do I care. I am just stating what I would do.

I look forward to seeing what you would do. I have stated my objectives, what would you do?

Kostas
 

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While I greatly admire the elegance of Apple Products, I would find a way to make it possible to easily change HDs, Optical Drives, video cards and batteries. We may be less than a year away from low cost high capacity SSD drives, and the current design makes it either very difficult or needlessly expensive to swap out the original drive.

Given the so so reliability of todays HDs and Optical Drives and this is a no-brainer.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
While I greatly admire the elegance of Apple Products, I would find a way to make it possible to easily change HDs, Optical Drives, video cards and batteries. We may be less than a year away from low cost high capacity SSD drives, and the current design makes it either very difficult or needlessly expensive to swap out the original drive.

Given the so so reliability of todays HDs and Optical Drives and this is a no-brainer.
totally agree with the ssd's
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I would do the following, in part:

1. Have a whole department of people dedicated to going onto boards like this, and then figuring out what issues people are having with the current products, evaluate them for validity/relevance (i.e. is this just one person, or does it indicate a wider problem), and have that department issue fix requests to the other departments responsible for the solutions, and track them down, or evaluate them for future release if patches to fix the issue are not possible.

2. Beef up the security of both OSes (OSX/iOS) as much as possible. Part of the reason that the Mac and the iDevices have been increasing in volume is because of the perception that they are a lot more secure than the alternatives. If this perception changes for the worse, it will impact sales long term. I want to eliminate that possibility entirely.

3. Allow all exclusivity agreements to finish, and then not sign any more. Tying yourself to a particular company (AT&T in the US) is not a good way to do business, especially if the other company is not that well liked by the general population in the first place. Why would I allow the sales of my product to be only through one company, when two or more could be selling them (ie. T-Mobile in the US along with AT&T currently, with Verizon to be added when 4G/LTE arrive)?

4. I would want to bulk up engineering resources, on both the hardware and software sides. The software side would need help due to the added software fixes and security patches (see parts 1 & 2, above), and the hardware side for increased integration on the IC side, and for things like RF testing. While I do think that the Antennagate issue on the iPhone 4 is overblown by a considerable degree, there is no doubt in my mind that the iPhone doesn't have the best RF performance out there, and that many future devices will have 3G/4G capability. I would like to have my devices be at the top of the RF performance curve to the degree possible. I would need a lot of sharp RF designers to make that come about.

5. Do a lot of long term thinking on where I would want the product lines to go. On the Mac side, I would want to map out a long term hardware and software (after 10.7, then what?) strategy. On the iPhone side, I would want to review the supply chain strategy aloing with future roadmaps. The current production rates on the iPhone and iPad are limiting both device penetration and sales/profits. I would really like to examine why this is going on, and how to go about addressing this issue. I would also like to rethink the iPod and its future.

Kostas
Number one is awsome if you become the next steve I want in on this 2 is a must 3 would be the best if apple did not sell through the carrier and just sell unlocked device though themselves and other electronic resellers 4 apple does allot of that already but improvements could be made and 5 well I am sure Johnathan Ive is working this up for us and phil schiller is working hard on the next os x
 

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Chas-m:

This is what I would do. IF you would do differently, so be it. I didn't think this was something that was a matter of right or wrong, just a fun, what is your opinion/idea of what is going on.
Yes, I understood that apart from your final point. I'm sorry if it came across as challenging. A lighter tone (like "how do you know they're not already doing this :)" was generally intended.

In terms of what Apple is doing online, I don't know, you don't either.
I'm not sure you what you mean by "doing online," but actually I do have a reasonable idea of what goes on at Apple. I used to work for them myself and still have friends there. I have (in my opinion) a good handle on the corporate culture of Apple.

If they actually did have a full, see what the online customers are saying department, we'd already have a small Macintosh with at least one, possibly two, PCI-E slots in the model line up.
I will refer you back to my earlier comment about just because YOU think something is true doesn't make it true. Just as with the Linux community, members of <name of special interest group> always think their numbers are hugely higher-- quantum orders of magnitude higher -- than polling actually reveals. Small groups tend to make big noise, but that doesn't make them viable or valuable. Mini-towers are well within the realm of the "home tinkerer" fringe market, which has never been a target demographic for Apple. Real professionals tend to want the biggest baddest thing Apple can whip together and don't care how much it costs because they generally make it back within days (or hours in some cases).

The response time to the current Autofill security gap was disappointing. While it appears that Apple responded about a week after the security gap was revealed, they knew a month before publication that the gap was there. This should not have ever been in the tech press, as Apple should have had it fixed weeks ago.
So a security issue that Apple found out about five weeks ago should have been fixed "weeks ago"? Apple's pretty innovative, but I don't think their time travel initiative has gotten its full funding lately ... :)

I don't know if you've ever done any home repairs, but very often you start out intended to fix one problem and in that process discover several others that you might as well tackle now while you're at it. I don't know if that was the case in this particular instance, but any programmer will tell you that often happens. Perhaps that introduced a delay, or perhaps just thorough testing took time. Five weeks doesn't sound like a lot of time to me to fix a serious problem like that (having worked on several large software projects myself in my time).

AT&T is still having a lot of coverage issues in places like San Francisco and New York.
I didn't say they didn't. I reported the polling of most users, who disagree with you to the tune of 73%, and added my own experience. I didn't say that people who are not getting good reception are imagining it. I said that every carrier has weak spots. Again see the maxim "just because you believe something to be true doesn't make it so."

Even if they had the best coverage, doesn't change the fact that it is a good idea to not rely on only one company to get your product out into the marketplace.
I believe I went out of my way in my post to agree with this.

I look forward to seeing what you would do. I have stated my objectives, what would you do?
Probably not a whole lot different. Having worked with Apple, I think most people have a rather distorted view of how the company actually works. The people who actually RUN Apple on a day-to-day basis, like Papermaster and Forstall and Mansfield and Cook (et al), do a fantastic job. Looking at their growth rate, market acceptance, product innovation, market influence, balance sheet, stock price etc since Steve took over, I don't see a whole lot of room for improvement quite frankly.

In my view, spending money and energy catering to tiny, impossible-to-please special interest groups (like the people who want FLAC built into iTunes, or people who wish every Mac was less than $500) is a waste of resources for a multi-billion $ company -- mainly because analysis of those groups always shows that they'd never really be happy with you anyway, and you'd never make enough profit to make it worth the effort.

A perfect example would be your mini-tower idea. Apple could never build one that had enough stuff (or the "right" ingredients) and was cheap enough to make you happy. There would always be SOMETHING you wished they had done differently. Apple is not in the business of building custom computers for Kostas (or anyone else) and never will be. They are a mass-market enterprise that strives to bring innovation to mainstream electronic products. All the available evidence would indicate that this approach is working *extremely* well for them.

If I'm wrong, you should gather the proof that there's a huge untapped market for your mini-tower out there, and present it to Apple -- you even have the email address of the CEO for heaven's sake. A "feeling" that there's a market for (x) is not enough -- you need some proof.

"If wishes were horses, everyone would ride!"
 

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While I greatly admire the elegance of Apple Products, I would find a way to make it possible to easily change HDs, Optical Drives, video cards and batteries.
Batteries I *don't* agree with, since Apple's current battery technology should *comfortably* outlast the computer's useful life (on average), and making them non-removeable allows Apple to make them custom-sized for best performance *and* to offer a program to replace them on those rare occasions when they actually need to do this for about the same price as buying a new laptop battery.

Regarding optical drives, however, I definitely agree that would be an improvement.
 

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Number one is awsome if you become the next steve I want in on this 2 is a must 3 would be the best if apple did not sell through the carrier and just sell unlocked device though themselves and other electronic resellers 4 apple does allot of that already but improvements could be made and 5 well I am sure Johnathan Ive is working this up for us and phil schiller is working hard on the next os x
As part of number 5, I would take a very hard look at improving the gaming capability of the Mac platform, now that Steam has opened the door to current games on the Mac. Along with that would be a lower end (than the Mac Pro) machine with upgradeable graphics, perhaps through a PCI-E slot or two. As well, take a long hard look at finding a way to allow the use of standard (vs. Mac Edition) graphics cards. This may have presented a problem in the past with the multiple graphics IC manufacturers, but now that there are essentially only two (nVidia and AMD/ATI), both of which are used on Mac platforms already (so we know that the OSX graphics drivers already exist); this should not be impossible to do. Graphics driver support for OSX should be manageable. There may be some pent up demand for this, or perhaps an easier way at least to meke the graphics upgradeable in some way without a PCI-E slot. As CEO, I am trying to remove any barriers to more Mac sales, and one of the biggest commonly cited is gaming.

I am discounting Intel as a graphics chip maker, because Apple really doesn't use Intel graphics in any machine any more, and with the cancellation of the Larabee project, won't have graphics chips worth using anyway.

Apple should pursue worldwide, the direction they have taken in Canada with the iPhone, where subsidized phones are available through multiple carriers, and unsubsidized ones through Apple directly. In addition, I would, as Apple CEO, also mandate that any previously subsidized phone not currently under contract be unlocked, by Apple, at the Apple Stores, at a charge sufficient to cover labour costs. All subject to local laws and regulations, of course.


Kostas
 

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Apple should pursue worldwide, the direction they have taken in Canada with the iPhone, where subsidized phones are available through multiple carriers, and unsubsidized ones through Apple directly. In addition, I would, as Apple CEO, also mandate that any previously subsidized phone not currently under contract be unlocked, by Apple, at the Apple Stores, at a charge sufficient to cover labour costs. All subject to local laws and regulations, of course.


Kostas
I can certainly get on board with this!!
 

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Chas_M:

Writing to Steve about any form of expansion is a waste of electrons and photons. Everybody knows that he will not permit that. As for Apple building "custom" computers, they sort of already do, its called BTO. I wouldn't have had the expansion card hang up, and I would have introduced such a machine, and let the marketplace decide. I would come up with a machine that was close to the current iMac, with mostly the same components, but without the display and with a slot or two. Market can decide.

Steve has had his gaffes as well, witness the current state of the Apple TV, which is one of the things that I would take a long hard look at. Either address its issues, or terminate any future development. Same goes for the MacBook Air.

73% customer satisfaction is not something to be proud of, in any industry, much less a service industry. 73% implies that 27% are unhappy, not good.

As CEO, I think that the current team is fantastic and is to be retained. They would of course have my undivided attention regarding any major platform decisions.

The delay in the Autofill fix was more than likely related to Antennagate on the iPhone 4 using up resources, and as such is an indicator to me of an understaffed engineering (software in this case, possibly even the hardware engineering) group.

Gathering evidence of a previously unavailable machine is an impossible task, as you well know. The current Apple management team didn't know what the Apple TV would do before it was launched, nor were they certain of the iPad's success. There was no evidence that anybody was clamoring for an Apple TV, or an iOS based tablet, but it was launched anyway. In a similar manner, I would launch a Mac with upgradeable graphics, and let the market decide.

Kostas
 

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Batteries I *don't* agree with, since Apple's current battery technology should *comfortably* outlast the computer's useful life (on average), and making them non-removeable allows Apple to make them custom-sized for best performance *and* to offer a program to replace them on those rare occasions when they actually need to do this for about the same price as buying a new laptop battery.

Regarding optical drives, however, I definitely agree that would be an improvement.
I doubt seriously that these batteries will last 7 or 8 years which is what many people get out of an Apple Computer. An older computer won't run the latest and greatest but it will do everything it could do on the day it was purchased. Truthfully internet usage is the only item that requires one be reasonably up to date and even at that seven years, there are more than a few members on this forum running older computers for internet usage.

I know a lot of people on this forum do not consider $1000-$2000 to be a major expense but for many of us it is, and for us outliving AppleCare is not the gold standard. If it has a battery you need to be able to replace it at a reasonable cost. For those of us who live 100+ miles from a major city we are not only talking about labour to replace the battery but at least one day trip and the associated vehicle and meal costs.
 

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peek-a-boo
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I could make one in... *cough* flash.
;)
 

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"I'd shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders".

Oh wait. It's not 1997 and I'm not Michael Dell.

;)
 
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