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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I been doing graphic design for more than 14 years, I am good at using illustrator and photoshop CS2, never have time to learn web design properly, but I do have experience using imageready, dreamwaver and flash, but not good, and do not know how to upload a site, I quit my full time job recently and thinking about taking web design courses, I am checking the "web design, development and maintenance" certificate from Humber College, are they good?my main question is I do not want to spend time on learning illustrator and photoshop again, what program and which college should I choose? any suggestion?
thanks
Uni
 

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What is it that you are thinking of learning, php? html?, databases? mysql? or just learning Dreamweaver? you have lots of options. Online learning? or class setting?
 

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Hi all,
I been doing graphic design for more than 14 years, I am good at using illustrator and photoshop CS2, never have time to learn web design properly, but I do have experience using imageready, dreamwaver and flash, but not good, and do not know how to upload a site, I quit my full time job recently and thinking about taking web design courses, I am checking the "web design, development and maintenance" certificate from Humber College, are they good?my main question is I do not want to spend time on learning illustrator and photoshop again, what program and which college should I choose? any suggestion?
thanks
Uni
If that is the route you'd like to go, then do PLAR(prior learning) tests for the stuff you know and it will cut down on your course load.

Personally, web design isn't something I would bother going to school for. But I can't speak for how you personally pick up new concepts. I got a graphic design degree, then filled in the blanks by plugging away and learning on the fly making websites and using online resources along the way. The key is that you'll probably need to learn how to code, which may be a roadblock for you given your graphic design background. There are all sorts of programs that offer easy ways to make sites, but really that coding background is indispensable for when something goes wrong on a site. Learning CSS is what got me my last job, and I just picked up a book and worked away at figuring the ins and outs of it a couple of years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I do not know, that's how bad I am....:confused: I don't even know what is php?? I just know I want to learn how to put together a flash and dreamwaver base web site, how to create FTP site or may be a site that I could use it to sell things, e-commerce??
 

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I would suggest leaning the following:

1) FTP / Webhosting / Domain - Get a small account with a discount web host, create a basic site with iWeb (don't worry too much about style and content right now), then learn how uploads, downloads, updates, file placements, etc work. Get a domain name (eg. www.unigod.com), and again, spend a day or two playing around with your webhost, see what functionality they have, email accounts, etc. Most Webhosts will provide you with basic information on how to upload/FTP files to your webspace. Use a program like Cyberduck, RBRowser, or whatever. Lots of freeware options on the market. OpenDNS com

2) Once you are confident you have space to put up a website, and know how to upload a website, then you start designing your own pages. Dreamweaver is essential here. Start with basic HTML and CSS. Absolutely, I highly recommend taking full advantage of CSS right at the beginning. It will save you tons of headaches down the road.

3) PHP - once you get your head wrapped around HTML and CSS, start incorporating PHP. It is heavenly how useful PHP is. It isn't too difficult, and saves you a lot of time and effort in some areas.

4) Javascipt - it's good to know a bit of Javascript, but avoid it whenever possible. See if there are PHP and CSS options available before Javascipt. Sometimes using Javascript is unavoidable, and that's okay. It's kinda like Superglue. Used incorrectly, it's a pain in the ass. Used correctly, and it works really well. Just use it sparingly.

5) Avoid Flash whenever possible. Yes, it's fancy. Yes, it looks good. Too often though, you will find yourself neck deep in style and presentation over substance, and substance is WAY more important than fancy presentation. Just take a look at really popular websites like Digg, Fark, Apple, and Boing Boing. Very little Flash. It's more about content.

For HTML, CSS, and PHP, I beg you to pick up a good book on each. Yes, all this info is generally available all over the net, but nothing beats having a well written book right at your finger tips.

4) MySQL - this is where it get's really confusing. There is a lot of freeware scripts on the net for setting up MySQL solutions, Many of them I have used. I understand MySQL about as well as I understand women - i.e. it confuses the heck out of me, but I can usually figure out the basics enough for it to work.

Beyond that, you start getting into Web Application programming, with apps like ColdFusion and Ruby On Rails. That's where the big boys play, and that requires a lot of training and discipline. Not for the faint of heart.
 

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Is it matter what webhosting company I choose for Mac user or no? do you have a good one in mind? thanks again
No it shouldn't, you can u/l or d/l using fetch, or if you have dreamweaver you can just plug in the user setting and sync everything while you work.

If you feel a little overwhelmed trying to learn on your own, I would suggest a night course in just html/webdesign basics. They usually run you a couple of hundred dollars at a community college. From there you'll be able to figure out if this is the route for you, if you can learn html, the other basic programing you should be able to learn on your own.
 

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I took this at Ryerson

http://ce-online.ryerson.ca/ce/cale...on=program&sub=atd&cert=ATDINT09&mode=program

But before I decided to take some courses, I took a bit of time to learn the terminology and a bit of programming on my own. The basic grounding like HTML, XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript (in that order). I used the Peachpit series of books (which are my personal favourite), but there are other series of books that you can look into, or that you may know of that are your personal favourites.

Be prepared to spend on the above courses, as they aren't cheap.
 
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