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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys.

I was wondering why the WD External Drive loads super slow during file sharing? The size of my external is 500GB - but for some reason it's not true cause when I formated the drive it listed 460GB to 470GB free. Anyways moving on; I backed up my computers at home and put all the pictures, apps, movies and documents on the external. Everytime I log into my router it takes about a minute or two to load the files; could this be something with my computer, router or external?

Here's how my router is set up;

MyBook (name of router)
-Apps
-Backup
-Documents
-Movies
-Music

If I click on MyBook (it loads super fast) if I go to click on Movies it loads super slow

Here's how I have my connection set up;

BASEMENT COMPUTER (desktop Windows Vista) <--- don't ask :)
-rogers internet (modem connected to router LINKSYS WRT350N
-Linksys (basement computer pluged into a ethernet port)
-4 laptops at home wireless (2 MACS / 2 WINS)

Here's a snapshot of me opening the router now


Here's a snapshot of me waiting for 1-2 minutes :( is this common?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Interesting.... I think i figured it out.

I noticed that my computer was streaming a YouTube file which I guess somehow was using all of the speed on the router/internet and since the external drive is connected to the router I guess too many transfer packets were going on at once so I stopped YoUTube and now it seems to be fine... but does that make anysense? How can downloading from the net & file transfer from External Drive (connected to router) shared among computers conflict that?
 

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No drive is really as big as advertised.

Actual capacity is less when formatted. Common knowledge these days (at least we thought).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No drive is really as big as advertised.

Actual capacity is less when formatted. Common knowledge these days (at least we thought).
Hey Lars.

Sorry, I don't follow; not sure if you are making fun of me or ur just stating your point...I never knew when you format the drive you'd get less then what it is.
 

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Not making fun of anyone. :) Just stating how it is. Your internal drive is the same way; actual formatted capacity is less than advertised and is displayed under System Profiler (or Command + I under 'Macintosh HD'). There's some lengthy, technical explantation as to why that is, but I don't know enough about how hard drives function to explain it. Perhaps someone else can chime in here...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yah i figured you weren't making fun :) we normally get a long for as long as I can remember sir! ;)

Well, I sort of figured the problem out and I'll test it out more. I will try to download a file let's say 100-200mb and at the same time try to open the "movies" folder that is a "shortcut" (alias) on my desktop (screenshot below - trying to show off my desktop) :)



So in theory, if it loads slower then if I wasn't downloading anything; than I know it has to do with the router & the packets that are being downloading & file transfered at the same time that would cause the latency.
 

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Not making fun of anyone. :) Just stating how it is. Your internal drive is the same way; actual formatted capacity is less than advertised and is displayed under System Profiler (or Command + I under 'Macintosh HD'). There's some lengthy, technical explantation as to why that is, but I don't know enough about how hard drives function to explain it. Perhaps someone else can chime in here...
Hard drives are marketed as having 500GB, which if you read the fine print on the side of the box is defined as 500 billion bytes. This is all fine and good for a base 10 system that we humans are used to, however, computers really like base 2. So for a computer, a kilobyte is actually 2^10 bytes, or 1024 bytes. 1 megabyte is actually 2^10 kilobytes, etc etc. So what your computer is really seeing is 500 billion bytes / 2^30 (bytes/gigabytes), which is roughly equal to 465GB.

Snow leopard now displays the marketing figures.
 

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And to answer the other portion of your post (the first entry of which is REALLY WIDE -- next time, scale the screenshot down a bit!), yes there's only so much bandwidth your wireless modem has available, and downloading stuff eats up part of that bandwidth (or most of it in some cases).

Just avoid downloading a lot of data when you're trying to access remote files and all should be good. You might wish to also test your "wireless throughput" -- in other words, compare a wireless file transfer to a wired one (with nothing else running that could be using bandwidth) and compare the results.

Naturally, wireless will be slower, but if you're using an "N" router you should be getting good throughput, unless of course there is a "g-only" device attached to the network. If that's the case, the whole network drops down to g-speeds and you don't get the "N" level throughput.
 

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You are just an illusion
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movies, pictures and documents are previewed.. that's why it's slow to load when you are trying to access it remotely. Not to mention, USB + SMB on a router = even slower.

I access my pictures over a gigabit wired network, and it does take sometime before it is fully previewed.

I actually never thought of it that way, but my movies are stored in individual folders. So Finder will actually NOT preview every files stores before you can access it.
 
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