Canadian Mac Forums at ehMac banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if this is the correct forum but as it will all be done on a Mac I'll take a chance. I have been putting together the equipment needed to transfer my old family regular 8mm films to digital. I am not familiar with the Video cameras that are on the market. What I am hoping for is some suggestions to help me find what I need. From all the information I have I am looking for a camera that will be able to focus on aprox a 7" x 9" image. The distance from the image would be less than 5'. Would this be possible with any of the older Analog camcorders does anybody know. I have noticed the prices of the HI 8 cameras are very reasonable would they do the job I am asking of them. Thanks for the help. :D :D

[ November 11, 2003, 08:27 PM: Message edited by: jrtech ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
If you are going to edit on a mac with Final Cut Express or iMovie or Final Cut Po, it is usually best to get a good quality DV camera that has built in firewire. That way you shoot your footage and transfer/digitize with the same device. It adds more wear and tear on the moving parts but it's usually the cheapest route. If you use analogue cameras then you will most likely have to buy an A/D convertor (500.00) to get your images into the mac. The image quality on Hi8 and DV cameras varies for manufacturers and models. Sometimes a Hi8 camera can have a better image than a DV camera or vice a versa, again there are always different factors to consider. If budget is the key issue here. The cheaper DV cameras almost always have poor low light shooting which means the black areas of your image will have a lot of noise/dancing pixels. There are too many DV cameras to list here in this post. The specs I look for in a DV camera is lens size and the number of chips. Bigger lens=more light can enter into the camera. The more chips (3 CCD) the better the colour and better contrast. You will not be able to tell how the image of a camera is going to be by walking into a store and looking at the LCD screen on the camera. The only way to tell is by recording and playing back on a good monitor or TV.
In Toronto Vistek rents many different cameras. Maybe a rental is what you need to figure out your needs. It's about 50.00 to 100.00 a day to rent depending on the camera. Maybe there is a store in your neck of the woods that rents.
Have you looked into having a post production house do a professional transfer? I don't know how much money you want to spend or how important image quality is to you.

Hope I haven't confused you. I just want to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,774 Posts
What you need is the following:

1) a decent miniDV camera. Forget about 8mm or hi8, they are analog...not digital, and you'll have to buy more gear to get the new footage into your computer for editing. Digital8 is a dead format as well, but it'll do the trick. If you find one cheap, buy it.

Best to get a Canon ZR series or even better yet, buy a Panasonic. Avoid Sony unless you want to get very familiar with the local repair shop. 500 to 800 bucks should get you a fine miniDV camera and you won't believe how sharp the picture is.

2) you need a device known as a "tele-cine" converter. Its a three sided box that you project the old 8mm film into and point the miniDV camera into the other side. They are not expensive, and not much larger than a toaster. You could probably make one if you had to. Any decent pro camera shop in your area will be able to get one for you. Probably for less than a hundred bucks. (I saw a used one for 25$ at a camera show a while back.)

Then all you need is an 8mm projector, a whole bunch of blank miniDV tapes and a few hours of spare time. :cool:

One further thought here. If you miniDV camera allows you to shut off the sound then you might want to take advantage of this feature. Otherwise you'll have the sound of the projector occupying your new video soundtrack (unless your old 8mm films have sound tracks. Many didn't).

If you want to shut out the sound of the projector, and can't do it via the camera controls, then drop by Radio Shack and pick up a stero mini jack that you can plug into your cameras microphone input. That should shut off the mic that's built into your camera and give you a virgin soundtrack to work with when you edit the whole thing on your computer. (you might want to add music or a voiceover with iMovie.)

Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info guy's, I have a telecine converter, ADVC unit, and the variable speed projector. After reading quite a bit on this subject I have decided to try the method of displaying the projected image to aprox size of 7" x 9". Then recording this on the video camera. This is why I was wondering about the ability of the older cameras to focus closeup. So is it possible to do this with an analog (cheap) camera and if so are there any suggestions as to which older units might I be looking for. The other factor is my Father who took the original films (bless his heart) was not exactly Steven Spielberg so the quality of the film, is more sentimental than anything. :D :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,251 Posts
I have to disagree with Macnut...

Sony's are great choices. You can't beat anything that comes witha carl zeiss lens. Most of their MiniDv line have firewire...

I use a DCR-PC9 with my 12" PB G4... it is awesome. The three CCD models are all very expensive. Depending on what you want it for... The consumer line of product from Sony is very good in my opinion. Any left over money can be used for those OOOOhhhhhh soooooo expensive accessories... mics, lights, filters, batteries, etc...

PS... DO NOT let anyone talk you into a $70 plus firewire cable. A regular firewire cable is fine.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top