Canadian Mac Forums at ehMac banner

1 - 20 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
According to cnet, it looks like Apple may be adopting Light Peak technology in the upcoming Macbook Pro update. This might explain why Apple has been slow to adopt USB 3.0.

Newdeal, though, made a good point on this topic exactly one year ago. When will we see Light Peak peripherals? It could take awhile, so maybe we will still see USB 3.0 along with Light Peak on Macs.

I think its pretty clear USB 3.0 will be the technology for the next few years so yeah I am sure apple will have it. I am guessing they would like to introduce light peak at some point but USB 3.0 will be easier to implement due to the backwards compatibilty and also I am sure that lightpeak is going to take a bit of time to be priced well enough for them to fit it into systems and get peripheral makers to adopt it. [snip, snip] I will guess that USB 3.0 won't be in macs until 2011 with the macbook pros and mac pros getting it earlier in the year and the macbook and imacs getting it towards the end of the year
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,720 Posts
... Newdeal, though, made a good point on this topic exactly one year ago. When will we see Light Peak peripherals? It could take awhile, so maybe we will still see USB 3.0 along with Light Peak on Macs.
Exactly, do any Light Peak capable peripherals even exist yet? USB 3.0 peripherals do, it would be silly for Apple to adopt a technology for which no peripherals exist all the while bypassing an existing technology that provides far greater speeds than anything they offer now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Refresh my memory, Screature. Did Apple adopt Firewire before there were any/many Firewire peripherals? I don't recall.

And on that same notion, Apple introduced AirPrint and suddenly we're seeing AirPrint compliant devices (at least from HP anyway).

I guess the question is: Does Apple have the clout to drive peripheral manufacturers to quickly embrace Light Peak?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,720 Posts
Refresh my memory, Screature. Did Apple adopt Firewire before there were any/many Firewire peripherals? I don't recall.

And on that same notion, Apple introduced AirPrint and suddenly we're seeing AirPrint compliant devices (at least from HP anyway).

I guess the question is: Does Apple have the clout to drive peripheral manufacturers to quickly embrace Light Peak?
I don't recall the exact history in terms of peripheral development and actual deployment of the standard. Firewire is the Apple branded version of the IEEE 1394 interface which was developed in conjunction with Sony (branded i.Link) and Texas Instruments (branded Lynx).

As I recall the deployment of Firewire and i.Link was primarily used in the beginning in conjunction with video cameras and audio components.

The main point for me is this (as I mentioned in my previous post), why leapfrog over USB 3.0 which has an established base of peripherals already in manufacture in favour of a standard that has next to no/no peripherals ready to be used. Effectively adding a port/feature that is currently useless.

I guess they are adopting the "Field of Dreams" approach... "build it and they will come". Which can be true, but why not in the meantime provide a truly useful feature/port.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
Light peak can handle multiple protocols, I'm sure an adapter kit will fill the void until devices come out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The cnet article mentions that the initial implementation of Light Peak will likely use copper, not fiber optic, so a USB 3.0 adapter isn't impossible, I'd assume. This other article indicates that Light Speed could be used as the carrier protocol over which native protocols, like USB 3.0, can run.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,314 Posts
Refresh my memory, Screature. Did Apple adopt Firewire before there were any/many Firewire peripherals? I don't recall.

And on that same notion, Apple introduced AirPrint and suddenly we're seeing AirPrint compliant devices (at least from HP anyway).

I guess the question is: Does Apple have the clout to drive peripheral manufacturers to quickly embrace Light Peak?
Actually, any printer can become AirPrint compatible.
 

·
Klingon Warrior
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
I read somewhere that there may be breakout boxes that would connect over a single light peak cable into the Mac. I wouldn't trust breakout boxes under normal circumstances, but I think if anyone can figure a way to make them stylish, unobtrusive and highly function; I'd say it has to be Apple lol!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
Refresh my memory, Screature. Did Apple adopt Firewire before there were any/many Firewire peripherals? I don't recall.

And on that same notion, Apple introduced AirPrint and suddenly we're seeing AirPrint compliant devices (at least from HP anyway).

I guess the question is: Does Apple have the clout to drive peripheral manufacturers to quickly embrace Light Peak?
The thing about apple is they can do what they want everyone has to adapt..
if you recall - USB was out for a while but it really did not take off until apple included it in the first imacs.
so if apple comes with the light peak or what ever they will call it.. not to worry everyone with have to adapt.. or be left behind..
sadly that is the way things go.
remember when they dropped firewire 400, every one made adaptors to convert to 800.
 

·
Vorlon Ambassador
Joined
·
5,295 Posts
The main point for me is this (as I mentioned in my previous post), why leapfrog over USB 3.0 which has an established base of peripherals already in manufacture in favour of a standard that has next to no/no peripherals ready to be used. Effectively adding a port/feature that is currently useless.
Because USB 3.0 will be here and then gone in 2-3 years? From what I read Lightpeak is supposed to replace USB, firewire, SATA, etc. It would be great if we didn't need several different kinds of ports.

Besides, if Apple followed the peripheral companies, we'd probably have parallel ports and floppies. It's amazing how fast periperal companies can adapt and get something out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,720 Posts
The thing about apple is they can do what they want everyone has to adapt..
if you recall - USB was out for a while but it really did not take off until apple included it in the first imacs...
I disagree/don't agree (this is for SQ ;)... inside joke... please disregard what is in the parenthesis, mc) I was a PC (Windows) user when USB came out and it was ubiquitous in the PC world before Apple joined the party....

They weren't/aren't always leaders and in many ways compared to the PC hardware world Apple were/are followers, to the extent that they wait to see what truly works and what people want... they learn from other people's early mistakes... and this isn't a bad thing. It makes a lot of business sense... this is the "conservative" part of their business model and I think it has served them well overall.

Apple are leaders in terms of concept, design, software, build quality and in the past, displays (no longer sadly) but in terms of "PC" hardware, aside form the PPC chip (really Motorola) and Firewire (in conjunction with Sony and Texas Instruments) and the Mac Mini they really aren't trail blazers in terms of "hardware". You can't be all things at once. Specialization is/can be a good thing... when you combine that with revolutionary concepts and design... well you get Apple. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,720 Posts
Because USB 3.0 will be here and then gone in 2-3 years? From what I read Lightpeak is supposed to replace USB, firewire, SATA, etc. It would be great if we didn't need several different kinds of ports.

Besides, if Apple followed the peripheral companies, we'd probably have parallel ports and floppies. It's amazing how fast periperal companies can adapt and get something out.

I don't think USB 3.0 will be gone in 2-3 years and you need to read my subsequent post Kosh...

Actually no Light Peak will not "replace" any of those technologies, at least directly and to begin with. It will simply provide a common "entry point" for any of those technologies.. that is one of the things that makes it revolutionary.

Again I don't agree with the rest of your post, see my post above.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,115 Posts
Refresh my memory, Screature. Did Apple adopt Firewire before there were any/many Firewire peripherals? I don't recall.

And on that same notion, Apple introduced AirPrint and suddenly we're seeing AirPrint compliant devices (at least from HP anyway).

I guess the question is: Does Apple have the clout to drive peripheral manufacturers to quickly embrace Light Peak?
I recall Apple adopting Firewire when there were very few products to be had—even years before OS X. One of the first devices that I recall utilizing it was a scanner. :lmao:

Apple seems to have the vision of where tech is heading and getting a jump on it. Firewire never really caught on with the Windows crowd despite USB's lack of performance.

I think, if anything, we may see Firewire disappear eventually.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,720 Posts
I recall Apple adopting Firewire when there were very few products to be had—even years before OS X. One of the first devices that I recall utilizing it was a scanner. :lmao:

Apple seems to have the vision to see where tech is heading and getting a jump on it. Firewire never really caught on with the Windows crowd despite USB's lack of performance.

I think, if anything, we may see Firewire disappear eventually.
Apple didn't adopt the IEEE 1394 interface, they were a major developer of the standard.

Actually the IEEE 1394 (not just firewire, Sony had i.Link, Texas Instuments had Lynx, all essentially the same thing) interface was adopted by many video camera manufactures and digital audio manufactures many years before OSX and was adopted even in the PC (Windows) world, it was the development of USB 2.0 that started the long decline of the IEEE 1394 interface.

I agree though that Firewire (IEEE 1394 interface) is well on its way to extinction.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,524 Posts
Hmmm... from my recollections I tend to agree with macintosh doctor and the comment at Why Powered USB Is Needed, Part 1: The Short History of USB » Ad Terras Per Aspera

"Greg Grothe says:
April 1, 2007 at 12:03 am
The one part of the history he left out was that in 1998 while most IBM PC’s had a USB port, none of the peripheral manufacturers were making USB devices. When Apple announced going to USB, this forced that segment (Mac peripheral market) to go to USB – and it exploded. In a year you had gobs of USB devices, for both the IBM PC’s and the Macs. Apple’s move made USB take off – we owe the kudos to them."

I was using an ADB G3 Mac at the time and recall many a snide remark from some Winbox users about Apple being such a looser and were now installing those useless USB ports in thier new Macs.

And Apple almost blew it with the round "Hockey puck" USB mouse that came with those Macs. ;-)
 
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
Top