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Ok, so I'm a bit slow with computers (especially Mac's since I'm new to them) but I'm hoping to have someone explain to me very simply exactly how wireless works.

Here's what I have in my home: We have cable with Cogeco and obviously an external modem for it. We only have 1 computer (a desktop PC) so I have no experience with networking or multiple computers, etc.

I will most likely be purchasing a MacBook and I know they come with the airport card already installed, so that's not an issue.

So here is where I'm a bit confused. Do I need to get a new modem from my cable company that has an antenna? (the one we have doesn't). Or do I just need to get the Airport Extreme base station (or the simple little Airport express wireless base)? And if I only need the Airport Extreme or the Airport Express, how exactly does my modem factor into everything? Do I have to unplug the DSL and the Ethernet from my modem and connect them to the base station? I feel like if I'm unplugging things from my modem, that the computer I'm currently on (the PC) won't work. A friend of mine says I need a router. Is the Airport Extreme and the Airport Express routers?

So I'm REALLY hoping that someone can put everything very simply for me because I'm really confused. I looked around online for a while but I couldn't find anything that made it absolutely crystal clear. Especially how my cable modem and the base station work together, etc.

Thanks guys!
 

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tilting at windmills
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I have a Linux PC, a Mac Mini without wireless capability and a MacBook with wireless capability. I also have an Airport Express.

I am on Cogeco Cable and have the cable modem without an antenna.

But...

What else I have is a normal router. My Linux PC and the Mac Mini are connected to the router by ethernet cable, my Airport Express is also connected to the router by ethernet cable. The router is connected to the Cogeco modem with ethernet cable.

Therefore everything is wired except for my MacBook which connects wirelessly to the Airport Express which in turn is connected by wire to the router.

Too confusing?

Simpel answer - what you need is a router. Connect your PC to the router, connect your Cogeco modem to your router, connect your Airport Express to your router and your Mac laptop will work wirelessly.

Cheers
 

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Depends

You COULD get a Linksys wrtg but that would more then likely drive you nuts , im fairly computer savvy and its a bit of a pain.

Just get the Airport Extreme , plug your ethernet cable from your router. Pop the cd into your macbook and your in business....apple...it just works .
 

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Someone will correct me if I am wrong but you only need a wireless router.

cable mode----->router------> PC (wired port) + macbook (Wireless).
Ignore in the printers and entertainment consoles in the diagram below.



The airport express is a wireless router with the additional functionality of streaming itunes wirelessly to your stereo or powered speakers and a usb print server.

For a wireless router get apples airport extreme ($200) for greater speeds while sharing files on your local network, greater range, stronger signal and for future proofing. But if you are like most people ( surfing, chating, download music or movies etc) getting a wireless G router will be sufficient. Any of these routers will do, as can an airport express ($119). From that futureshop list I would recommend the D-Link wbr-1310 ($44) or the Linksys WRT54G ($69).

After setting everything up ensure to read the manual and setup the wireless security.

Cheers.
 

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You need an Airport Extreme, or a similar wireless router. If you get in trouble, just go to any computer store and ask for a wireless router.

The Airport Express is not a router. It is a wireless bridge. A router is designed to reroute internet: you plug your cable modem into the wireless router, and you can then run lines off the router. A wireless router adds wireless capability in addition to wired routing.

The Airport Express only has one input: you can plug your cable modem into it and turn it into wireless. But you cannot plug a computer into the Airport Express. What the Express will do is extend the range of an existing wireless network, as well as stream iTunes and allow for wireless printing.

Good luck!
 

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OK sorry to hijack this thread but i have a newb question too...

my PC is down in basement... so if we was to get a wireless router... would it reach upstairs... the lounge room is directly above the computer... or would i need to get say the Airport Express and place it at the top of the stairs to extend the wireless to upstairs???
 

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OK sorry to hijack this thread but i have a newb question too...

my PC is down in basement... so if we was to get a wireless router... would it reach upstairs... the lounge room is directly above the computer... or would i need to get say the Airport Express and place it at the top of the stairs to extend the wireless to upstairs???
all you need is a wireless card i will definelty reach the signal just make sure you have a 802.11G card
 

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Ok, here we go addressing various points:

A. The Apple Airport Express Base Station is a router from the reviews that I've read.
B. You cable company's wireless router will probably be cheaper than any Apple wireless product and you will be able to get their tech support if you run into any problems.
C. The range of any wireless product will depend on what is between the router and the client. So, will it reach from the basement to the top floor? Maybe. Whether or not it is 802.11b or 802.11g does NOT matter. I don't know about 802.11n but I would steer clear of any 802.11n products until they hammer down the specification.

So, what would I suggest? Go and get a Linksys WRT54G wireless router. Why? Because, it's extremely popular and inexpensive so you will find lots of people using it and who can help u with it. I have one and it's a piece of cake to use. I currently have a mixed Linux/Mac/Windows network running off of mine and I can even print wirelessly to the networked Laserjet. That's incredible!

Software-wise, it can be upgraded via various firmware releases. Hardware-wise, it's about the same as any reasonable wireless router in that it has enough wired ports for most home setups along with wireless functionality.

Get the WRT54G, this applies to both the OP and naturespixels, set it up and then, if it doesn't work and none of us can help either one of you, go with an Apple product.
 

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The Airport Express is not a router. It is a wireless bridge. A router is designed to reroute internet: you plug your cable modem into the wireless router, and you can then run lines off the router. A wireless router adds wireless capability in addition to wired routing.
This is incorrect. The AirPort Express is most certainly a router, albeit a wireless router only. You are correct that it can not also serve as a wired router since it doesn't have a built-in ethernet switch, but in all other respects, the AirPort Express is a router an can be connected directly to a cable/DSL modem to share the internet connection with wireless computers with network address translation, firewall, port filtering/forwarding, etc.

If you only plan on using your computer(s) wirelessly, the AirPort Express will work perfectly. It also makes a great portable router to take on trips to places that offer wired high speed internet, but not wireless. Simply plug in your AirPort Express, configure, and you're off to the races.

I have an AirPort Express by the way and have owned 5 other routers from LinkSys and D-Link. The AirPort Express is the only one that hasn't given me problems. I'm looking to get an AirPort Extreme to replace my main D-Link router at some point.
 

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OK. So here's my setup:
-> indicates Ethernet wire
~> indicated USB 2.0 wire
*** indicated 802.11 wireless connection to router

Rogers -> SMC 802.11b router -> Vonage phone adapter
*** Airport Express ~> Epson Stylus CX6600
*** MacBook (rev1)
*** HP Laptop
*** eMachines Laptop
*** XBox 360 (future)
*** Guest laptops when visiting
*** Motorola wireless bridge -> ???

For your setup go

Cogeco -> Router (linksys, Airport Extreme, Netgear, etc) -> PC
*** MacBook (rev2)

Simple enough?
 

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The AirPort Express is most certainly a router, albeit a wireless router only.
Very helpful! But the Internet still doesn't work for me, either with the Gigafast USB plugged into my white iBook or the Apple Airport card in the iMac 17" flatscreen. (both running OSX 10.3.5).

That is, both can "see" the AirPort express, judging by activity lights, but only the iMac with Airport card can connect to the Dell which is acting as a router and SMB file server. The iMac can connect through it all to Google but not any other website or email.
Weird! The iBook with USB net dongle can't connect to anything at all. Is this a Windows XP firewall issue?

So: ADSL - > Dell -> Airport Express -> iMac Airport card = SMB connectivity, Google, but
ADSL - > Dell -> Airport Express -> iBook with USB card = no connection.
 

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Get a cheap, wired router. There is usually a d-link or the like on sale at Future Shop or Best Buy every week, $20 to $40. Or compare at
ehmac.pricecanada.com

Then:

ADSL > wired router > Dell
and
ADSL > wired router > Airport Express > wireless Macs

Your life will be much easier this way. It would also be easier if you had an Airport Card in your iBook rather than the Gigafast USB stick. For one thing, it wouldn't stick out; it would also provide easy integration. Which iBook do you have?

And... don't forget to use the Airport Admin Utility to make sure you have security using your Airport Express.


(If you can, situate the Airport Express near your stereo, plug that in, and you can play your music through the stereo using your wireless Macs).

Very helpful! But the Internet still doesn't work for me, either with the Gigafast USB plugged into my white iBook or the Apple Airport card in the iMac 17" flatscreen. (both running OSX 10.3.5).

That is, both can "see" the AirPort express, judging by activity lights, but only the iMac with Airport card can connect to the Dell which is acting as a router and SMB file server. The iMac can connect through it all to Google but not any other website or email.
Weird! The iBook with USB net dongle can't connect to anything at all. Is this a Windows XP firewall issue?

So: ADSL - > Dell -> Airport Express -> iMac Airport card = SMB connectivity, Google, but
ADSL - > Dell -> Airport Express -> iBook with USB card = no connection.
 

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I also am having trouble understanding airport express. I just got a macbook and I was hoping to set it up for the internet. I have an imac that is connected to dsl with a router, my sister's pc is also connected to this router. If I get airport express, can I just connect it to the router with an ethernet cable to get a wireless connection for my macbook, or do I need to get the airport extreme? Thanks.
 

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I also am having trouble understanding airport express. I just got a macbook and I was hoping to set it up for the internet. I have an imac that is connected to dsl with a router, my sister's pc is also connected to this router. If I get airport express, can I just connect it to the router with an ethernet cable to get a wireless connection for my macbook, or do I need to get the airport extreme? Thanks.
Either the Airport Express or Airport Extreme, both wireless routers, will work for you.
 

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You need an Airport Extreme, or a similar wireless router. The Airport Express is not a router. It is a wireless bridge.
Wait a minute - you're both right! Huntnig through the massive documentation on the AirPort Express, I find this Q&A:

What if my base station is connected to a router?
If your base station is connected to a router or other network device that is using NAT to share a single Internet connection with multiple computers on your network, and you are using DHCP to provide private IP addresses, you need to turn off NAT and DHCP on the AirPort base station.
Most networks need only one device using NAT and DHCP to provide IP addresses.
To turn off NAT and DHCP:
Open AirPort Admin Utility, select your base station, and click Configure.
Click Network and deselect the "Distribute IP addresses" checkbox.
If your base station supports Power over Ethernet (PoE), by default the "Distribute IP addresses" checkbox is not selected, and the base station is not using NAT or DHCP.
With NAT and DHCP turned off, the base station acts as a simple bridge between the wired and wireless computers on the network
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I have been using my Dell (with XP) as a file server and a router, since it has a second network card. So I am puzzled why this setup wouldn't work.

Best suggestion so far: get a router and plug the Dell and Airport Express into that. Problem with that: can't access files on the Dell. Even better: get a wireless card for the Dell and make the Airport Express a router. Problem with that: Telus refuses to support routers.

Keep on sloggin', I guess. Once I find a solution, I'll share it with ehMac.
"Ammo"
 

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Good afternoon one and all! Rather than create a new thread, I figured I'd piggyback this one since my query is related.

Here's the deal: My gf has a PC and I have an iMac G5 (2Ghz, 20", 250GB HD 1GB DDR SDRAM; if it matters) and we're on Rogers Cable for internet. We have a Nintendo Wii, a DS Lite each and a Sony PSP for wireless devices and then we have a PS2. Because of all this we're thinking of getting the Airport Extreme Basestation with Gigabit Ethernet. While I feel fairly confident that it'll work fine with my iMac and her PC, I am concerned about whether it'll communicate with 1) Rogers high-speed modem and 2) our previously mentioned wireless devices.

Any help/knowledge regarding this is, as always, greatly appreciated. :)
 

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1) Rogers high-speed modem and 2) our previously mentioned wireless devices.

I have the 100Mb version of this router and it works fine with my Rogers provided modem. I haven't tested it with the other devices you have questions about.
 
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