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Is that important?
They feel better. Look spiffy too. If you're getting useless advice on how to implement a bad idea, the person should at least look sharp while wasting your time. They should also use a high quality of paper stock for their over-sized reports. The extra $1,000/day is about the little things.

But, yeah, nothing was going to save that $200 million.
 

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An interesting overview on union pensions backed by a StatsCan report.

Thought your taxes went to hospitals, roads, bridges or other infrastructure? Over 70% goes straight into employee bank accounts. They collect huge salaries then gigantic pensions until the day they die. Pension costs have increased 530% over the past 15 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #225 ·
But otherwise, how will the rude cipher who answers phones be able to engage in world travel after retirement?r
 

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Yep - saw this coming.

Politicians and employers catering to the baby-boomer demographic during heyday consumerism promised generous pensions that depend on (unsustainably) ever-increasing subsequent generations to cover the costs.

I was taught at an early age to, not only expect no 'pension' for myself, but to prepare any off-spring for the burden of covering the costs of these generous pensions.

:-(


An interesting overview on union pensions backed by a StatsCan report.

Thought your taxes went to hospitals, roads, bridges or other infrastructure? Over 70% goes straight into employee bank accounts. They collect huge salaries then gigantic pensions until the day they die. Pension costs have increased 530% over the past 15 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #227 ·
Nice to see you again, vancouverdave!

The problem with generous government pensions is that they were once designed to compensate for government wages that were LOWER than those found in the regular market. That's why they were called public service jobs. Now both wages and pensions/benefits are sky high.

Many American cities are going bankrupt because they can't pay the unfunded pension liability. In Houston alone, the pension system is $8.2 BILLION in the hole:

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/ne...oves-Houston-pension-reform-bill-11131170.php


Yep - saw this coming.

Politicians and employers catering to the baby-boomer demographic during heyday consumerism promised generous pensions that depend on (unsustainably) ever-increasing subsequent generations to cover the costs.

I was taught at an early age to, not only expect no 'pension' for myself, but to prepare any off-spring for the burden of covering the costs of these generous pensions.

:-(
 

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Good point. I see, even now, the public sector struggles to compete with private sector salaries when trying to recruit and retain talented workers.

Nice to see you again, vancouverdave!

The problem with generous government pensions is that they were once designed to compensate for government wages that were LOWER than those found in the regular market. That's why they were called public service jobs. Now both wages and pensions/benefits are sky high.

Many American cities are going bankrupt because they can't pay the unfunded pension liability. In Houston alone, the pension system is $8.2 BILLION in the hole:

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/ne...oves-Houston-pension-reform-bill-11131170.php
 

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...when trying to recruit and retain talented workers.
The public sector doesn't care about talent. All they care about is an ass (take that either way...) to plunk down in a seat & vote left. The dumber you are & the fewer questions you ask, the better.
 

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The problem with generous government pensions is that they were once designed to compensate for government wages that were LOWER than those found in the regular market. That's why they were called public service jobs. Now both wages and pensions/benefits are sky high.
I think this problem relates to scale. For a much smaller civil service, the pay and benefits are still below the private sector for the best people. But at the current size, a lot of average and below average people (for their education level) get hired. Most will never voluntarily leave because they have the best job they could possibly get.

Meanwhile, some genuine civil servants remain, taking lower pay than otherwise to serve the ideal. They're outnumbered.
 

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For all you union haters and union supporters today will be a watershed day as the SCOTUS rules on the Janus case. Public service unions everywhere, and maybe all unions are holding their collective breath I think on this one. If you are not familiar it would be the U.S. equivalent of reminding the Rand Formula.
 

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For all you union haters and union supporters today will be a watershed day as the SCOTUS rules on the Janus case. Public service unions everywhere, and maybe all unions are holding their collective breath I think on this one. If you are not familiar it would be the U.S. equivalent of reminding the Rand Formula.
Related:

Dem Senators Rally for Unions as SCOTUS Hears Mandatory-Dues Case

Massachusetts Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D.) and Ed Markey (D.) on Monday spoke at a Boston rally supporting the right of public-sector unions to extract mandatory dues.

These Democrats made the case that the Supreme Court should maintain government agencies’ right to mandate so-called fair share fees, Mass Live reported. They joined with union leaders to fight for the defendant in this case, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), Council 31, as the Supreme Court was hearing oral arguments about it.

The senators from the Bay State said the case against mandated fees is a scheme by Republicans’ billionaire donors.
Bold mine.

As opposed to say, Soros, Democrat billionaire donor?

And, if Fauxcahontas is for it, it's probably worth fighting against...
 

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Related to my post #232 above:

So. Much. Winning.

Fox News;

In a major legal and political defeat for big labor, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Wednesday that state government workers – whether they join the union or not – cannot be forced to pay so-called “fair share” fees to support collective bargaining and other union activities.

The conservative majority said a union’s contract negotiations over pay and benefits were inextricably linked with its broader political activities, and concluded workers had a limited constitutional right not to underwrite such “speech.”

“This procedure violates the First Amendment and cannot continue,” Justice Samuel Alito wrote in the majority opinion. “Neither an agency fee nor any other payment to the union may be deducted from a nonmember’s wages, nor may any other attempt be made to collect such a payment, unless the employee affirmatively consents to pay.”

While the current case applies only to public sector employees, the political and financial stakes are potentially huge for the broader American labor union movement, which had been sounding the alarm about the legal fight.

If you thought they were unhinged now…
:clap:
 

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This sets a great precedent!
Agreed.

Related:

Supreme Court Deals Severe Blow to Public Unions

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that no government employee can be fired for refusing to financially support a union. The decision frees workers who do not wish to join a union from being forced to pay the union nevertheless. This will likely spark a massive exodus from the ranks of public sector unions, weakening the Democratic Party.
Related, too:

Reversing 40 Year Precedent, Supreme Court Rules 5-4 That Unions Cannot Extract Fees from Non-Consenting Non-Members

So -- I guess unions will now be forced to appeal to workers and gain their consent/support for their decisions? How unamerican! It's much more American just to take money from unwilling people and spend it on whatever political purposes you like.
Nails it.
 

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Further on the Janus decision.

Public Unions Try to Hold the Line

Though the Supreme Court’s Janus ruling earlier this year was supposed to empty out their coffers, many government unions have yet to feel the full impact of the decision, which bars them from collecting fees from nonmembers. After decades of levying these charges, some unions remain flush with cash heading into this season’s elections, and they’re pouring millions of dollars into campaigns around the country—especially in Republican-controlled states—to raise taxes, expand government programs, increase mandates on businesses, and support political allies. Their efforts are a reminder that, for the time being at least, government unions remain a formidable force in American politics, waging battles for bigger, more expensive government.
 

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Right to Work Wins Out in Kentucky

Labor unions were dealt another blow in Kentucky after the state supreme court upheld its right to work law.

The state's highest court upheld a lower court judge's ruling dismissing the lawsuit filed by Teamsters Local 89. The 4-3 majority affirmed that the law, which prohibits mandatory union fees as a condition of employment, passed state constitutional muster and was appropriate under federal labor law.
Slowly. Surely...
 
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