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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I understand correctly, the new iMacs have an S-video cable connection which would allow it to plug into a TV. Personally, I would not want to utilize this ability, but I was wondering if an S-video cable might also be utilized running in to a VCR. Thus, one might take a home movie with a DV camcorder. Then, using the Firewire cable, the footage might be sent in to the iMac for editing with iMovie. I realize that this edited version can then be sent via Firewire back to the DV camcorder. However, using the S-video connection, might this also be sent into a VCR to make a VHS version of this iMovie footage? If so, are any special adaptors needed for this utilization? Merci.
 

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Yes, you could sort of do that Dr. G.. but it would work better playing out to the camcorder first, then to VHS... You could even set it up so that the video goes out through firewire to the camcorder and straight passes through the camcorder directly to VCR.

The reason this is better is kind of hard to explain. The video playing from iMovie is not full quality. iMovie scales back the video your are previewing so that it runs smoother. At least in iMovie 2... haven't got a chance to play in iMovie 3 a lot (What I'm doing tonight)

When you send the video back out to camcorder your getting the full monty. Ahh... here's a better explanation from Apple's knowledge Base:

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Topic

Sometimes when I play back a digital video (DV) clip that I captured with my DV camera, it appears blotchy, blocky, out of focus, and the colors are washed out. Why is this?



DISCUSSION

Reason: The process of decoding DV data, even over FireWire, requires large amounts of data and many computations. To maintain frame rate and view the movie at a normal size, only about one-fourth of the DV data is used in displaying the movie to the screen. However, the underlying DV data is still at full quality.

Computer Display Solution: The QuickTime Pro-enabled QuickTime Player can be used to display a DV movie at High Quality. To do this, open the movie with QuickTime Player, and select Get Movie Properties from the Movie menu. In the Movie Info window, select Video Track in the left popup menu, and select High Quality in the right popup menu. Check the High Quality Enabled checkbox to view the movie at full quality.

Frame rate will decrease substantially with this setting. The movie can be saved with this setting and from then on, when the Movie is played back in any application, it will be played at High Quality.

In order to maintain full frame rate during the editing and playback of DV clips, Final Cut Pro, iMovie, and other QuickTime-based applications typically default to using Low Quality. The important thing to remember is that Low Quality is strictly a playback mode for computer monitors, and does not affect the quality of the DV image that is sent out through FireWire to the DV device or NTSC monitor. The Apple FireWire output is always High Quality.

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You should note that only the new 17" iMac has the S-Video out.. And you do need a doo-hickey.



Sells seperatly for about $39 Cdn at most Apple Resellers. Can do S-Video or Composite. Great watching the DVD's you created or rented on TV! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Merci, ehMax, for this most detailed info. One other related question, would the hard drive on the iMac with a 7200 RPM be more effective than a hard drive with a 5400 (or less) RPM? I believe that it was Macdoc that suggested that I consider this when choosing between an iMac and an AlPB. Or was it Posterboy? Heart? Gordguide? Whatever, it had something to do with "dropping frames". I shall print off your posting for later reference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
By the way, Mr. Mayor, having the Queen send me her personalized "kudos" on reaching 1000 posts was quite classy on your part. Her having the certificate hand delivered to me by our Lt.Governor, complete with the royal seal, was a bit much on her part, especially since I am not a monarchist.
 

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Hey... no worries with the Queen. She owed me a favour. :D

7200 is a nice touch. Not really needed.. i digitize iMovies to a 4200 RPM LaCie pocket drive on occasion with no hiccups.. 7200 just has faster accees etc... Things may open quicker. Probably more essential for a higher end video app like Final Cut Express.

I thin the new 17" is a NICE machine. 64 MB Video Ram, fast drive, 4 x Super Drive, Audio In, S-Video out, VGA out, beautiful display, nice new iLife apps.... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ehMax, I am sure that either Posterboy or Macdoc suggested "ramping down" the iDVD burning speed to 1X rather than 4X, but he never fully discussed why this might be important other than for an external DVD player reading this Mac-created DVD. I don't see myself utilizing FCP, but the Express is a possiblity. We shall see.
 

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Some people hold the belief that burning a disc slower does wonders for its compatibility. I have friends that burn music CDs at 1x because it "sounds better", but I can;t personally hear the difference between my 8x burned discs from home, my 32x burned discs and their 1x burned discs.

That said, older CD Players have issues with burned CDs, and some people tell me that if the CDs are burned slower they are more likely to play. To test this theory I burned a disc at 1x and then again at 32x and tried to play them both in a friends 5 disc player, which is around 12 years old and one of the most picky ones I have ever seen. They both played fine. It's really the luck of the draw.

The issue is that the faster it burns, the more likely that the burner will make some little mistakes. Most CD players these days can compensate for minor burning errors the same way they can read past mino scratching, but older players have issues.

It is concievable that DVDs might have the same issues, but considering that 4x is not as huge a speed jump, I wouldn't worry about it too much.

--PB
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
PosterBoy, as always, thanks for the info. I did not mean to attribute a misquoted piece of technical info to you, and for this I apologize. Still, when there is some need for a specific piece of info, your expertise is usually there in a most relevant manner.
 
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