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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Now that prices of some SSDs have dropped to about $50 more than the same capacity 7200rpm 2.5 in. HDD, or even less of a price gap if there is an amazing sale, would it make sense to use a SSD to back up files instead of a HDD?

Happy Holidays!
 

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I have a 500GB mounted in the second drive bay of my MacPro. Use it do daily back-ups also to occasionally boot into El Cap.


Did not honestly see any real improvement over the straight HD when working in Snow Leopard. Probably because I have completely disabled Stoplight, which is a huge drag on HD response.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did not honestly see any real improvement over the straight HD when working in Snow Leopard. Probably because I have completely disabled Stoplight, which is a huge drag on HD response.
I am not looking for a performance improvement. I have a 750GB 7200rpm HDD to store files. Technically this is not a backup, as the only copy of these files reside in this HDD. In the last two weeks I have a heck of a time getting the drive to mount, sometimes it takes three or four unplugs and plugging it back in. As I am typing I am transferring every file on the problematic HDD to a 1TB HDD.

If I go get a 1TB SSD since it is on sale and pay only $30-40 more than a 1TB 7200rpm HDD, I may have a peace of mind that there won't be a mechanical failure to the SSD as it does not have moving parts. Does it make sense?

As to the problem HDD, I don't know if it is failing or there is an issue with the USB cable or the drive enclosure. Once all the files are transferred to another HDD, I will test if the cable or the enclosure causes the problem. But I have a feeling that the 750GB HDD is showing signs of problem. The drive has never been trustworthy. I bought it in 2012 or 2013 to replace the stock 500GB 5400rpm HDD in my MacBook Pro. The 750GB drive started to have the problem of not booting up in three months or so. I abandoned using it, reformatted it and put it away until two years ago when I used it to store files again.
 

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There's no guarantee that using an SSD will overcome your drive mounting problem.

You you may want to get that problem sorted out first.


- Patrick
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Now that prices of some SSDs have dropped to about $50 more than the same capacity 7200rpm 2.5 in. HDD, or even less of a price gap if there is an amazing sale, would it make sense to use a SSD to back up files instead of a HDD?

Happy Holidays!
Personally, I would opt for a higher capacity HDD rather than an SSD for backups. Perhaps some sort of NAS enclosure, with two 5400RPM drives in a RAID configuration might come out to the same price, and give a little more peace of mind?
 

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SSD disk are awesome, but they don't really carry the storage i need.
Just recently bought a 8tb HDD "regular mechanical" to store only my precious files like games, pictures, Music and all, but all my stuff are backed up to a SSD disk Via TimeMachine. Booting from an PCIE NVME M2 SSD disk with High Sierra on my fully upgraded 09 macPro. all other Bay drive have SSD 500 gig and bay one use 1 Tb SSD. My bay 3 uses that Mechanical 8tb.
 

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I am not looking for a performance improvement. I have a 750GB 7200rpm HDD to store files. Technically this is not a backup, as the only copy of these files reside in this HDD. In the last two weeks I have a heck of a time getting the drive to mount, sometimes it takes three or four unplugs and plugging it back in. As I am typing I am transferring every file on the problematic HDD to a 1TB HDD.

If I go get a 1TB SSD since it is on sale and pay only $30-40 more than a 1TB 7200rpm HDD, I may have a peace of mind that there won't be a mechanical failure to the SSD as it does not have moving parts. Does it make sense?

As to the problem HDD, I don't know if it is failing or there is an issue with the USB cable or the drive enclosure. Once all the files are transferred to another HDD, I will test if the cable or the enclosure causes the problem. But I have a feeling that the 750GB HDD is showing signs of problem. The drive has never been trustworthy. I bought it in 2012 or 2013 to replace the stock 500GB 5400rpm HDD in my MacBook Pro. The 750GB drive started to have the problem of not booting up in three months or so. I abandoned using it, reformatted it and put it away until two years ago when I used it to store files again.
I had the same problem a while ago with an External HDD.
SSD or HDD, if you are having issues with mounting your drive? i would look more towards like a bad drive? Bad USB cable or the onboard internal driver "electronic board". in my case, it was a Cheap USB cable that was broken. easy fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the suggestion. I don't think the problem is with the USB cable, as I don't have any issue using the same cable to connect two other external HDDs to my early-2011 13in. MBP and a 2015 27in. iMac. But I have yet to definitely rule out a bad HDD.

The connection problem only appears when I connect the "problematic" HDD to my really old 2007 15in. Santa Rosa MBP. The issue started to appear since September or so. Often I have to jiggle the USB cable connector once I plug it in the port to establish a contact then the drive is mounted but much slower than before. I could suddenly lose the connection if I shift the MBP ever slightly when it sits on my lap, then the drive gets dismounted improperly. Sometimes the data transfer starts off very slow and I have jiggle the cable again to get a faster transfer rate. Seems like there is a contact problem between the cable connector and the pins in the port.

Strangely when I connect the same drive with the same cable to the USB port on the other side of the 2007 MBP, a similar problem occurs. I actually wonder if the 2007 machine is on its last leg. My only use is to hook it up to the TV to watch videos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just recently bought a 8tb HDD "regular mechanical" to store only my precious files like games, pictures, Music and all, but all my stuff are backed up to a SSD disk Via TimeMachine.
I would like to know why you choose such a large capacity HDD to store your files, particularly when you say that they are precious. What if the drive fails, that's a lot of stuff to lose. Would it be better to use a few HDDs of smaller capacity so you don't have "all the eggs in one basket"? I know that there is no HDD/SSD and enclosure that is guaranteed not to fail.

A headache of living in the digital era.
 

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I for one use large drives for convenience of access to all my files in one place. Switching between external drives is a pain. I miss my Macpro with 4 drive slots.

That said, I do have multiple back up drives (smaller with specific use-photos/music/movies/work files/personal files/etc), just in case.
 

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One thought on SSDs. When they do fail it tends to be without warning and not recoverable.
 

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Advice I got from a professional data recovery expert: Backup your Data... and Backup your Backups... and label your drives! Also, keep a record of what is on your drives.

Like other posters here, I use mechanical drives for backup and mirror them for data security. You can generally get at least two mechanical drives for the price of a single SSD, and if you duplicate your backup then your data is still there if one of the drives fails. If you only have the SSD and it fails, your data is gone for good.

To keep track of what is on all my offline backup drives, I use this indispensable app: https://diskcatalogmaker.com/
 

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If they are, CanadaRam would carry them.

They are my go to for drives, except when I need one yesterday that is. :)
 

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I am aware of that, a sudden silent death without any warning.

Are 2.5-in. 7200rpm HDDs still being made?

A Quick Google search certainly shows there are lots of such HDDs still available although I believe some manufacturers stopped making such drives some years ago.

I installed such a WD model in my old MBPro before I replaced it with a solid-state drive, only to try and save some power. The speed increase wasn't anything to scream about other than boot times was about 15 seconds.


Patrick
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Advice I got from a professional data recovery expert: Backup your Data... and Backup your Backups... and label your drives! Also, keep a record of what is on your drives.

Like other posters here, I use mechanical drives for backup and mirror them for data security. You can generally get at least two mechanical drives for the price of a single SSD, and if you duplicate your backup then your data is still there if one of the drives fails. If you only have the SSD and it fails, your data is gone for good.

To keep track of what is on all my offline backup drives, I use this indispensable app: https://diskcatalogmaker.com/

One backup is not enough, I have 2. I have a local Time Machine on site and I have an offsite backup through a cloud provider called BackBlaze. Your local backup is useless if the building burns down. I like local for quick recovery, but if the building goes or the drive, it is comforting to know I still have it all in the cloud.

I think I paid $99 for 2 years unlimited storage through Backblaze.
 
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