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I've always found the rule or law that disallows teachers to assualt students in self-defense ridiculous and grossly unfair. I came across a CNN video in which they talked about increasing student-to-teacher violence; one teacher in particular was assaulted and had his neck broken by a student after the teacher asked him to remove/turn-off his iPod. He stated, "It took the police 1.5 hours to arrive.. had I hit him back, they would have been here in 3 minutes."

My thoughts? Give teachers and school staff the right to use force as required in self-defense, or hire authorized security guards to do the work for them. Disallowing them those rights only increases the student's modivation and level of violence used as they know their victim can't do jack all in return.
 

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Self-defense is self-defense in my opinion. It shouldn't matter who or where you are, you should be permitted to defend yourself. Hiring security wouldn't help much in a situation like this unless you had at least one guard in each room or corridor segment. This kind of thing happens fast so self-defense is really the only option.

In the case of a teacher/student altercation, there should be a greater charge on the teacher to prove that it was self-defense but in the end, with witnesses, etc. the truth should come out and the teacher should be let off.

I find it amazing how quickly youth will scream abuse when they don't get their way these days.
 

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Bring caning back! ;)
 

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I got an email death threat once; it was dealt with promptly and effectively.

Back on topic, if a student were to assault me, I would react as a person first and a teacher second. (It's easy for me to say that, though, since, in my particular case, you wouldn't see any difference.) I am aware of cases of teachers in my district defending themselves, and those cases have overwhelmingly come down in the teacher's favour.

Guards are not the answer; they would exacerbate the problem.
 

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Yes, teachers should absolutely be allowed to defend themselves. Kids who disrupt a classroom environment need to be dealt with immediately.

The government also needs to step up and implement steep fines to hit delinquent parents in the pocket book.
 

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The government also needs to step up and implement steep fines to hit delinquent parents in the pocket book.
Is it always necessarily the parents' fault, though? For their child's behavior? How would you prove the parent is at fault? (or partly at fault.)
 

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I've always found the rule or law that disallows teachers to assualt students in self-defense ridiculous and grossly unfair. I came across a CNN video in which they talked about increasing student-to-teacher violence; one teacher in particular was assaulted and had his neck broken by a student after the teacher asked him to remove/turn-off his iPod. He stated, "It took the police 1.5 hours to arrive.. had I hit him back, they would have been here in 3 minutes."
Was the situation you're commenting on based on a Canadian event?

IMy thoughts? Give teachers and school staff the right to use force as required in self-defense, or hire authorized security guards to do the work for them. Disallowing them those rights only increases the student's modivation and level of violence used as they know their victim can't do jack all in return.
How do you know what you have described as your opinion is not the reality in Canadian schools?

If the facts and reality are not Canadian, why bring it up? :confused:
 

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I think you would have a tough time with fining the parents, just because it is hard to prove. I do believe a teacher should be allowed to defend themselves, though if I were the teacher, I would not care if I was allowed to or not, I will defend myself no matter what the law/rules says. I have trouble believing a teacher would let himself be beaten like that until his neck broke, I am guessing it happened in the first blow. I would like to to emphasize defend myself, not lose control and beat the student or whoever, in a fit of rage. Take down the student fast and quickly and let the authorities do the rest.
 

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Your topic says "Should teachers have the right ... ". Are you proposing we take that right away? Everyone in this country has the right to self defense, no matter who you are or what your job.

Some people don't know what that means and go overboard. When you deal with a country that allows you to shoot unarmed people "in self defense" I think you can expect a need to clarify and restrict the rules in certain cases, like the classroom.

I think we should let CNN and the rest of the US figure out how to reconcile those two themselves, because it's a problem largely of their own creation.
 

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Is it always necessarily the parents' fault, though? For their child's behavior? How would you prove the parent is at fault? (or partly at fault.)
I was a problem child from grade 5 - 11, my mom wasn't the problem at all, and any punishment to her for my behavior would have been useless. I would not have cared. But she should of had control of me though right? Wrong, she couldn't match up to me physically, not a chance. Sure she could have thrown my ass out on the street, but that is no answer.

I think teachers should be trained to look deeper into "why is the child acting up." Had a teacher been trained to see the signs of depression, those 6 years could have only been 1 or 2. There is a reason to why children act out, and they need to start looking deeper instead of fueling the fire with detentions or suspensions.
 

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Wow. Timely thread.

Here's my story (all from this year):

1. A teacher in my school was physically assaulted and called horrible names by a group of students. The teacher was trapped in the classroom by the students who refused to allow the teacher to leave. The students pummeled the doors and windows with basketballs and their fists.

Student consequence? Some suspensions and a talking too.

2. A teacher was punched repeatedly by a student. You could see the bruises.

Student consequence? 2 day suspension

....and I could tell you more.

We've all had enough with this bull-^#& and are having our teacher's union president come to our school to listen to our concerns. We feel so powerless and deflated right now.
 

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Wow. Timely thread.

Here's my story (all from this year):

1. A teacher in my school was physically assaulted and called horrible names by a group of students. The teacher was trapped in the classroom by the students who refused to allow the teacher to leave. The students pummeled the doors and windows with basketballs and their fists.

Student consequence? Some suspensions and a talking too.

2. A teacher was punched repeatedly by a student. You could see the bruises.

Student consequence? 2 day suspension

....and I could tell you more.

We've all had enough with this bull-^#& and are having our teacher's union president come to our school to listen to our concerns. We feel so powerless and deflated right now.
Perhaps you could shed some light on the notion that a teacher can not defend his or herself.

If a teacher was say a retired professional boxer (like my Vice-Principal in Jr. High) and a student squared off to fight the teacher could that teacher protect and defend her/himself? What do you think might be the consequences for the teacher?

In the real instance of my Vice-Principal, in Jr. High, all he did was assume the protective position of putting his "dukes up."

The student had the good judgment to listen to the council of the crowd and not take the VP on.
 

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I've always found the rule or law that disallows teachers to assualt students in self-defense ridiculous and grossly unfair.
While the wording of this is questionable (see bold), I have no issue with teachers defending themselves from an assault by a student, be it verbal, physical or psychological. At the same time, I would expect the school administrators to deal with these issues in a forthright & appropriate manner. iLabmAn, I would not consider those appropriate punishments.

If someone physically assaulted my spice, who is a teacher, I would find it extremely difficult not to make it a very personal issue...

I think teachers should be trained to look deeper into "why is the child acting up." Had a teacher been trained to see the signs of depression, those 6 years could have only been 1 or 2. There is a reason to why children act out, and they need to start looking deeper instead of fueling the fire with detentions or suspensions.
I have issues with this. It's not the teacher's job to be psychologist, analyst, shrink, whatever. They have enough on their plate being teacher, mentor, coach, supervisor, chaperone, disciplinarian, friend, volunteer, fund raiser, et al.

<Disclaimer: This isn't an attack on you or your mother. The questions are rhetorical.>

Why, over the course of those 6 years, didn't your mother seek professional help in finding out why you were cutting up at home/school/wherever? Why blame the teachers for failing to diagnose your problem? Why is it that when a child is perceived as a trouble maker, suddenly the responsibility rests on his/her teacher to deal with the problem? At what point do parents abdicate their responsibility?
 

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While the wording of this is questionable (see bold), I have no issue with teachers defending themselves from an assault by a student, be it verbal, physical or psychological. At the same time, I would expect the school administrators to deal with these issues in a forthright & appropriate manner. iLabmAn, I would not consider those appropriate punishments.

If someone physically assaulted my spice, who is a teacher, I would find it extremely difficult not to make it a very personal issue...



I have issues with this. It's not the teacher's job to be psychologist, analyst, shrink, whatever. They have enough on their plate being teacher, mentor, coach, supervisor, chaperone, disciplinarian, friend, volunteer, fund raiser, et al.

<Disclaimer: This isn't an attack on you or your mother. The questions are rhetorical.>

Why, over the course of those 6 years, didn't your mother seek professional help in finding out why you were cutting up at home/school/wherever? Why blame the teachers for failing to diagnose your problem? Why is it that when a child is perceived as a trouble maker, suddenly the responsibility rests on his/her teacher to deal with the problem? At what point do parents abdicate their responsibility?
I don't think a class on child psychology is too much to ask of our teachers. They spend up to 8 hours a day with our children and if the child misbehaves it only makes their life worse.

Me I would want to solve the problem not let it snowball into a student like we've seen lately in the States. They had their suspicions about the guy, had they had some training maybe it could have been avoided.

Sure parents should arm themselves with that knowledge as well, it all helps. Unfortunately for my mother, being a single parent of 4 boys, trying to make ends meet, I slipped through the cracks. But I doubt I would have listened to her anyway.

And what if the parent(s) are the problem? Then who do they have? A teacher isn't just a clock in clock out assembly line, they must have some investment in each student. I don't see helping a child with long division any different than recognizing a possible emotional problem.

I'm not saying it was their fault that I wasn't diagnosed sooner, but constant suspensions didn't help any. Where a sit down with a counselor might have. A teacher is trained to deal with children, I don't think it should take a visible bruise in order for them to notice something is wrong with a child.
 
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