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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Post in this thread should be based on reports or discussion based on or characterized by the methods and principles of science from study, research using the scientific method. Reports with regards to the application of scientific research i.e. applied technology/engineering principally not discussed else where on Ehmac.

Reports that merely contain the word "science" and are not based upon scientific research: technological, technical; research-based, knowledge-based, empirical, evidence have another avenue on Ehmac to be posted and discussed therefore are not required to be posted in this thread.

Dictionary said:
scientific |ˌsīənˈtifik|
adjective
based on or characterized by the methods and principles of science: the scientific study of earthquakes.
• relating to or used in science: scientific instruments.

DERIVATIVES
scientifically |-ik(ə)lē|adverb
ORIGIN late 16th cent.: from French scientifique or late Latin scientificus ‘producing knowledge,’ from scientia (see science). Early use described the liberal arts as opposed to the “mechanic” arts (i.e., arts requiring manual skill).
Dictionary said:
scientific
adjective
1 scientific research: technological, technical; research-based, knowledge-based, empirical.
Let's see some cool information from Science.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
I heard this today on CBC Radio 1's Quirks&Quarks
For the past few decades, one of the key debates in science has been the fight over nature versus nurture. Researchers have argued whether much of the human experience - our behaviour, our flaws, our talents, and even our diseases - was a result of nature or nurture - our environment or our biology. Well, the debate is over. It's neither - and both. In a new book, Identically Different, a leading British researcher, who has studied twins for decades, shows how our nature and nurture really can't be separated - and both can be changed.


http://cbc.ca/quirks/media/2012-2013/qq-2013-02-02_05.mp3

Link to Feb. 02/13 Broadcast of Identically Different
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I found it interesting the reporting, that back pain is more likely to be inherited than breast cancer.

CBC'sQuirks&Quarks said:
"...the new science of epigenetics is revealing that gene expression can be profoundly influenced and even changed by the environment."
I wonder would a person (more likely a woman than a man) find solace with the information that an individual is not doomed to be afflicted with the condition?

Could it cause a person to suffer, worrying about which misstep would cause the cancer to be expressed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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I found it interesting the reporting, that back pain is more likely to be inherited than breast cancer.
You need to be careful with that kind of statement.
It may well be true for the general population but for those with the gene that puts them at high risk for breast cancer epigenetics has little or no play. They ARE at high risk.

I tend to come down firmly on the genetics side...you can't make a marathon runner from someone with 80% fast twitch muscle fibres and that's genetically endowed.

Indeed I think epigenetics is going to provide myriads of fascinating insight but how much will be actionable is the question.

There are some obvious aspects like drinking while pregnant leading to FAS kids.

There is an awful lot of woo potential in epigenetics.

Good thread BTW.

This was one of THE most fascinating and impressive bit of science I've seen in a while.

CBC -The Nature of Things with David Suzuki - - Lights Out!

The test of melatonin as a breast cancer inhibitor was just brilliant.

This I think is the paper the Nature of Things covered off

Oscillation of clock and clock control... [Breast Cancer (Auckl). 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

Here is an associated paper
Light at Night, Shiftwork, and Breast Cancer Risk

This had been hypothesized for a decade or so but the experimental results were astonishing and should lead not only to measures for shift workers especially women but also as the show covers for any of us working odd hours and wanting to perform our best and still get a good nights rest ( they covered off nuclear workers and truck drivers in the program ).
Well worth watching.
 

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Had to learn far more about c-difficile than anyone wants to know. Extremely debilitating, often fatal. Current cures involve massive doses of antibiotics, which is often the same treatment that caused the disease to begin with.

Were I facing that disease I would happily have volunteered for those trials. Glad to see they were reasonably successful.
 

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Hmmmph - strange you mention this - brilliant program on the battle against superbugs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKjzRagzzlA

Trying to source the paper on the last bit about interrupting communication between bacteria. Great bit of Eureka work.

GF - ( who is in medicine ) thinks there might be a Nobel in it

Here is the abstract

Cell-to-Cell Communication in Bacteria

Summary: Bonnie Bassler studies the molecular mechanisms that bacteria use to communicate with one another, and her aims include combating deadly bacterial diseases and understanding cell signaling in higher organisms.
more
HHMI Scientist Abstract: Bonnie L. Bassler, Ph.D.

Wonderful detective and experimental work. :clap:
 

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Worth trying to catch the documentary on it - the trailer is above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I heard years ago on PBS's Nature or some such show about the use of phages instead of antibiotics to control bacteria. In the future this may become another arrow in the quiver of treatments.

Phage Therapy
 

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Yeah I'm surprised phages have not progressed as apparently in Eastern Europe they were in in use for quite some time. That part puzzled me.
This was written in 2001

COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION OF PHAGES
D'Herelle's commercial laboratory in Paris produced at least five phage preparations against various bacterial infections. The preparations were called Bacté-coli-phage, Bacté-rhino-phage, Bacté-intesti-phage, Bacté-pyo-phage, and Bacté-staphy-phage, and they were marketed by what later became the large French company L'Oréal (68). Therapeutic phages were also produced in the United States. In the 1940s, the Eli Lilly Company (Indianapolis, Ind.) produced seven phage products for human use, including preparations targeted against staphylococci, streptococci, Escherichia coli, and other bacterial pathogens. These preparations consisted of phage-lysed, bacteriologically sterile broth cultures of the targeted bacteria (e.g., Colo-lysate, Ento-lysate, Neiso-lysate, and Staphylo-lysate) or the same preparations in a water-soluble jelly base (e.g., Colo-jel, Ento-jel, and Staphylo-jel). They were used to treat various infections, including abscesses, suppurating wounds, vaginitis, acute and chronic infections of the upper respiratory tract, and mastoid infections. However, the efficacy of phage preparations was controversial (20, 26), and with the advent of antibiotics, commercial production of therapeutic phages ceased in most of the Western world. Nevertheless, phages continued to be used therapeutically—together with or instead of antibiotics—in Eastern Europe and in the former Soviet Union. Several institutions in these countries were actively involved in therapeutic phage research and production, with activities centered at the Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology, and Virology (EIBMV) of the Georgian Academy of Sciences, Tbilisi, Georgia, and the Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy (HIIET) of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw, Poland.

EIBMV.
TheEliavaInstitute(Yahoo! GeoCities: Get a web site with easy-to-use site building tools. /hotsprings/spa/5386) was founded in 1923 by Giorgi Eliava, a prominent Georgian bacteriologist, together with Felix d'Herelle. D'Herelle spent several months in Georgia collaborating with Eliava and other Georgian colleagues, and he intended to move to Tbilisi permanently (a cottage built for his use still stands on the Institute's grounds). However, in 1937 Eliava was arrested by Stalin's NKVD (the predecessor of the KGB), pronounced a “People's Enemy,” and executed. Frustrated and disillusioned, d'Herelle never returned to Georgia. Nonetheless, the Institute survived and later became one of the largest facilities in the world engaged in the development of therapeutic phage preparations. The Institute, during its best times, employed approximately 1,200 researchers and support personnel and produced phage preparations (often several tons a day) against a dozen bacterial pathogens, including staphylococci, Pseudomonas, Proteus, and many enteric pathogens. Most of the Soviet studies reviewed in this article involved phages developed and produced at the EIBMV.

HIIET.
The Hirszfeld Institute (http://surfer.iitd.pan.wroc.pl/index1.htm) was founded in 1952, and its staff has been actively involved in phage therapy research since 1957, when therapeutic phages were used to treat Shigella infections (B. Weber-Dabrowska, personal communication). The bacteriophage laboratory of the Institute was instrumental in developing and producing phages for the treatment of septicemia, furunculosis, and pulmonary and urinary tract infections and for the prophylaxis or treatment of postoperative and postraumatic infections. In many cases, phages were used against multidrug-resistant bacteria that were refractory to conventional treatment with antibiotics. The most detailed studies published in English on the use of phages in clinical settings have come from this institute (52–58).
Bacteriophage Therapy
 

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I can see the resemblance, but that side of the family was always a little snooty.
 

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hehe ..... there was a bronze sculpture in the Smithsonian of the little rat. Was quite incredible to see.



They had the various human species at their actual physical heights as well in the same exhibit area.....bloody hobbits are tiny.
3 and half feet full grown - notice the big hands. Tolkien almost had it :D
Missed the dreadlocks.

 

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Too cool



Jet propelled squid.in the air..and can the suckers every move :eek:

Marine biologists confirm squid can fly
George Dvorsky

Marine biologists confirm squid can fly Scientists have known for quite some time that squid have the capacity for short burst flight, but they've only known this through anecdotal accounts. Until recently, they've never actually been able to properly document the phenomenon, or get a sense as to how the mollusc pulls it off. Now, thanks to Jun Yamamoto of Hokkaido University, not only have the rumors been proven true — scientists have also figured out the mechanics behind squid flight.

Back in July 2011, Yamamoto and his team were tracking a large group of squid (Todarodes pacificus, also known as neon flying squid) about 370 miles (600 km) off the coast of Tokyo. As the boat got nearer, the 8-inch (20 cm) squid propelled themselves from the water where they remained airborne for a distance of 98 feet (30 meters) — and at the breakneck speed of 37 feet per second (11.2 m/s).

more
Marine biologists confirm squid can fly
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Amazing Views of the World’s Volcanoes From the International Space Station

More images such as these can be viewed here

 
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