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howdy...looking for recommendations on a printer that will handle proofs for a tabloid size magazine that I'll be publishing this summer. Is canon vs epson the end of the road or are there some other brands with models I should know about.
 

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epson 3000 and get a good RIP
can handle paper up to 16.5" x 23"
for your case you can use 13" x 19" paper and that way you get 11x17 with full bleed and crops / regs

i recommend them to my clients all the time, even as a less expensive proofer for an epson 9xxx series

make sure you buy the one with the ethernet card already built-in and get a better RIP than the stock EPSON RIP or you'll be waiting and waiting and waiting....
 

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You will note that macspectrum specialises in pre-print software. It's what he does for a living. It's in his signature. It naturally follows that he is probably pretty darned savvy when it comes to printers as well.

And...from personal experience...I can assure you that he is "smarter than the average bear".

I'm bettin he knows this stuff, inside and out. :cool:
 

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check out epson's 13x19 printers here.

check out epson 3000

i prefer the 4 dye based inks over the 7 ultrachrome inks for proofing
most presses are 4 colour (yes, i know there are more)

the 7 ultrachrome inks don't give you the best pre-press proofing results because you probably won't be using a 7 colour press
the light cyan and light magenta and "other" black don't conform to CMYK specs for spot (pantone) colours

the 4 colour dye based inks on the other hand, do exactly that

if you are printing posters without a real need for colour matching to a press, go ahead with something like a 2200, but if you are really wanting to "proof" before going to press, you are much better off using a 4 colour device
if you want the Pantone CV284 to look close to what Pantone CV284 is supposed to look like on press, then the 3000 is a better bet

and make sure you get a good RIP
we offer a RIP for professional environments and i have seen wha the right RIP can do and what the wrong RIP cannot
(ok, a little self promotion there) :D

as far as RIPs go, it's all a matter of what you expect, or better yet, demand from the RIP/printer combo
remember that Epson is in the consumables business
they want you to buy lots of paper and ink
they don't have much interest in saving paper and ink, right?

for example, our RIP offering colour calibrates each pixel according to the paper type and then does an ink pull back as well

lower end RIPs don't do ink pull backs and tend to over saturate the colours to acheive "brillant" output
in colour proofing our philosophy is to produce output that most closely matches the final press output, NOT to make a glossy super high resolution proof that the press can never produce

again, it's all a matter of what you need
 

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i love those epson printers. if you are going inkjet, thats what id pick up. the 2200 (?) is probably the best you can do for under $1000, the postscript software may be another $130, but you need that. its also 13x19" so you can do those full bleeds. i have an epson stylus photo EX and its old, but its still really good. i have an associate who has the 2200, and he loves it. i've been eyeing one of those for a long time... good luck!
 
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