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you could always open the terminal and run:

sudo update_prebinding -root /
type in your password

and it will prebind your OS. After a reboot, you should notice some speed improvements.

booting up into single user mode and running:
/sbin/fsck -y
it's like running disk first aid on OS 9
You don't have to worry about screwing anthing up in single user mode as the drive is in read only mode and you have to run another command to be able to make any changes to files.

to boot up into single user mode hold down the "command+s" keys at boot

once the command is run and the task has completed, simple type reboot at the prompt.

That's about as free as one can get with simple disk utilities
 

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Questions and Answers:

Here are a couple of programs to try, all have a GUI, some are freeware, shareware and commercial.

MacJanitor
SpeedMeUp Pro
Cache Control
Jaguar Cache Cleaner
System Optimizer X 3.1.3
Xupport

All are available via a search of www.versiontracker.com

--

I have run the fsck thingy a number of times.

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR> dthompson101 wrote: You don't have to worry about screwing anthing up in single user mode as the drive is in read only mode and you have to run another command to be able to make any changes to files. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

How does fsck do anything if it is in read only mode?

I believe the -y allows for the changes (as in y = yes)

Do I have to enter in /bin/fsck -y or is just fsck -y enough and how about the very simple fsck ?

Sorry more questions than answers.
 

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Generally you should run UNIX commands verbatim, especially if you are taking someone's advice. However, you could do a man fsck [manual for fsck] command in the terminal to see what comes up, any alternates should be there.

There are shortcuts and alternate commands for many UNIX processes, but if you don't know them it doesn't do any good and could potentially do harm.

One of the things I love about OSX is you can run the terminal while the Desktop is visible and running. Doing so in other UNIX/Linux distros (ie running the X Window System and entering terminal commands) often screws up the works.

The reason I mention this is it's my habit to copy and paste terminal commands from a sticky note. Very handy.
 

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Oh man I had to look verbatim up just to understand.

SYLLABICATION:
ver·ba·tim
PRONUNCIATION:
v?r-b??t?m
ADJECTIVE:
Using exactly the same words; corresponding word for word: a verbatim report of the conversation.
ADVERB:
In exactly the same words; word for word: repeated their dialogue verbatim.
 

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I'm hardly an expert on such things, but I could have sworn having read somewhere that Jaguar has built-in pre-binding maintenance.

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Clockwork:
I am looking for some free pre-binding and maintanence programs any recomendations?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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Just to be sure here with fsck

the command: /sbin/fsck is just telling the terminal where to run the executable (fsck)

Mac OS X.2 seems to have fixed this problem and ther must be a link in a login to shell to know where fsck exists. I don't believe 10.1 had this implemented.

Putting the -y on the end of the command is just basically telling the computer to go ahead and fix whatever system problems it finds.

Since you are in single user mode, you cannot VI, PICO or edit any other files. If you were to try and change your host name in /etc/hostconfig file, you will get an error that stats:
ex/vi: Error: /var/tmp/vi.recover: Read-only gile system
ex/vi: Modifications not recoverable if the session fails.
ex/vi: Error: hostconfig: Read-only file system
ex/vi: Error: Unable to create temporary file: Read only file system

The command to run to make changes in single user mode (which I do not recommend if you are not comfortable with UNIX) is:
sbin/mount -uw /

Just to be proper here, while yes you can run many commands in the terminal while running the aqua interface or even from the console shell upon login, you are not able to run fsck at all.

After a kernel panic or a crash, if you boot up in verbose mode, (command + v) you will notice that Mac OS X will run the fsck executable upon boot and repair any problems with it.

There are times however when you must manually run this command if you feel there may be problems with the system.

Jaguar also does not offer any "automatic" prebinding support outside of you creating your own cron job to run at a certain time each day and add it to your crontab file located in /etc/

This way you could tell your server for instance that every day at 12:00 A.M. to run the prebindings update command. This however does not do much good as to make the prebinding active you must reboot the box. (which would kill your uptime and disrupt your sevices)

Also, keep in mind that the disk utility that is on your Mac OS X install CD and the fsck executable are 2 different appliations. While I do not know the differences between the 2 of them, they both seem to work a little different, however to my knowledge, Apple does not recommend using one over the other.
 

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Just to echo the above, all you have to do is run the terminal to force update all your prebindings.

I've noticed when I do that there are often prebindings left that cannot be completed but I don't know enough to understand why this is. Below is the script that I use (you'll be prompted for your password after entering it):


sudo update_prebinding -verbose -force -root /
 

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The difference between FSCK and Disk Utility is that Disk Utility is written to examine HFS and HFS+. while FSCK was originallly written to work on UFS disks.

Apple recomends using Disk Utility if it is available, as it does a bit more thurough job of examining disks. FSCK is no slouch, but it has to translate HFS into UFS to examine a disk, and then translate UFS back to HFS to make any changes necessary.

Adding -Force to your update_prebinding command will force it to rebind files that don't necessarily need to be rebound. I usually reccomend this, just because most people I recommend it to don't do it very often. The command should look something like this:
Code:
You can also add -verbose if you want to see every little thing it does.

When you boot into single user mode, you don;t have to type in the /sbin/ part of any command. just typing "fsck -y" or "mount -uw" will work fine. It has been this way since the first time I tried it, on OS X 10.0.4. Adding the "-y" part to FSCK does indeed tell it to assume the answer is yes to any operation it would normally have to ask you to verify with a yes or no.

Check out System Optimiser, it does a pretty good job, and also check out MacJanitor as it does a bunch of UNIX tasks that dont normally get to be completed in a home computer set up (they are designed to run at 2.30 in the morning or so and MacJanitor just makes them happen when you click the little button).

--PB
 

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All MacJanitor does I believe is to put a GUI on the following three Terminal commands:

sudo sh /etc/daily
sudo sh /etc/weekly
sudo sh /etc/monthly

Easy to run, I just keep a sticky with all my handy commands on it (since I don't speak UNIX) and cut and paste from there. Very "System 6" but it works.
 
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