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Netgear for me. I own a refurbished Netgear router and it works flawless, it only cost me $12. If you go to Tigerdirect website people have commented on Netgear Wireless adapters, the reviews are pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Netgear for me. I own a refurbished Netgear router and it works flawless, it only cost me $12. If you go to Tigerdirect website people have commented on Netgear Wireless adapters, the reviews are pretty good.
i'm more concerned with driver/chipset compatibility than brand-lovin'. i'll go check it out though, thx!
 

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Well, this is never an easy situation. Many manufacturers just don't get it, and they do not bother to release an OSX version of their drivers. (But then, they are also not moving towards supporting Vista either!) Having been through this process, it can be frustrating. I would suggest buying an adapter wherever they have a good return policy. Perhaps it will be a bit more expensive but you won't get stuck with duds. Manufacturers use different chipsets, even in runs of the same model, so the model number may or may not help you.

Any Broadcom chipset will work natively, and will be detected as an Airport card. These are a little hard to find. Fairly common is the RaLink chipset, which have made a good driver available for OSX. Both Belkin and DLink use this chipset in their newer adapters. We have had excellent luck with the Belkin, and the DLink WUA-13xx adapters they sell at The Source. The DLink G-122 ued to work, but the newer versions have a different, unsupported chipset that will not even be detected by the Mac.

Some NetGear adapters use compatible adapters. However, the inexpensive one (I can not remember the model number) that seems to be everywhere does not have a "chipset" per say, it requires the Windoze only driver for the data pump, and hence, will not work under any other OS. Buffalo used to make a good adapter, some with the Broadcom chipset, others with I think the Prism II chipset. Newer ones do not have drivers available for OSX, perhaps using the same "RIP chipset" used by NetGear.

ZyDas based cards work, but since ZyDas went out of business last year, it is obvious that they do not supply a Leopard driver. There may be aftermarket drivers that will work. As a rule of thumb, if it works under Linux, there is a good chance it will also work under OSX.

The next point is performance. Even though the adapter may run at "G" speeds (or perhaps even "N" speeds"), unless you have a Mac that has USB 2.0, you will only be able to obtain "B" speeds. However, since many Hotspots only allocate a "B" speed channel per user (because of multiple users needing access), this is less of a liability than one may think. If you are using it at home, well, you do have a number of good, if less portable, alternatives if you really need a little extra speed.
 

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I have a D-Link 122 running on an iMac DV400, and I had to search around for the proper driver for it. With that in place, it works just fine. This is an older dongle, and I don't know if D-Link has updated what comes with those for sale now.
 

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I have a D-Link 122 running on an iMac DV400, and I had to search around for the proper driver for it. With that in place, it works just fine. This is an older dongle, and I don't know if D-Link has updated what comes with those for sale now.
I had an old 122 that worked perfectly, and from what I have read, versions 1 to 3 run fine on OSX. However, they changed the chipset and the version 4 variant is now Windoze only. I think it uses the same chipset as some of the recent NetGear adapters that lack a data pump, and hence, that is part of the driver, which is Windoze only. On either a Mac or a Linux box, the chipset can not even be identified, which is a pretty good sign of a poor quality device that will be short lived. I think they have kind of given up on the 122, as they are more marketing the WUA and Rangebooster series. The only problem I had with the DLink is that it is wide, so you can not connect it and a mouse at the same time; but it does come with an extender cable, which works fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Evan:

THANK YOU! I just got home and installed the WUA-1340. Perfection.

~spoonie
 

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Do you guys think this will work? Or is it too new a version of the D-link 122?
You have to go by the version number, which is part of the serial number. From what I recall, versions 1, 2, and 3 work with Mac, while 4, 5 and 6 do not. A friend of mine bought one a week or so ago, it was a newer one, and it wouldn't even run under Windoze, and we could not determine the chipset because it wouldn't even show up as a USB device on the Mac.

However, he came across a Belkin "G" speed adapter at factorydirect.ca that worked, and uses the same RaLink chipset as the DLink WUA-1340. In fact, he can run either with the driver, with no changes whatsoever.
 
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