Canadian Mac Forums at ehMac banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42,902 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a client who has rendered a line illustration in black ink. At about 10% size, the lines are barely visible and the illustration becomes unrecognizable.

The illustrator tells me that I can do something in PhotoShop that will maintain the thickness or heaviness of the lines, even if the illustration is significantly reduced in size.

Has anybody heard of this?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,899 Posts
I have a client who has rendered a line illustration in black ink. At about 10% size, the lines are barely visible and the illustration becomes unrecognizable.
The illustrator tells me that I can do something in PhotoShop that will maintain the thickness or heaviness of the lines, even if the illustration is significantly reduced in size.
Has anybody heard of this?
Line weight can be manipulated in vector art (like Illustrator) but in Photoshop, there are no lines -- there are only pixels on a canvas. There is no "Preserve line weight" command.

The first thing to try is to re-scan the artwork from the original, paying attention to getting the contrast as high as you can and the lines as black as you can.
Then in Photoshop you can manipulate the Contrast and Brightness, both before and after resizing. Also, you can play with Sharpen filters.

If you have to, at the full size, try "Selecting" by colour range all of the "white" area, then invert the selection. You will now have all of the "ink" selected. You can then Expand the selection, then Fill the selection with black. This will artificially increase the weight of the lines, then when you shrink the file down, there will be more line left. You will lose detail however.

The biggest problem you have is that you are shrinking the art far too much. When you have lines and details that become smaller than one pixel on the target size, then it is impossible to render them, so Photoshop takes a stab at making them a shade of gray.

The real answer is to have the illustrator do another small size version of the art with bolder strokes and much less detail. But that costs money.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42,902 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks very much, folks. That gives me a full range of options to choose from.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top