Canadian Mac Forums at ehMac banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This might only be of interest to some, but AMD has released its Opteron processor.

If you haven't heard of it, the Opteron is a x86-compatible 64-bit CPU. Unlike the Itanium, the Opteron can run 32-bit x86-code natively (unlike the Itanium, which essentially emulates it). It's fairly cheap (less than 500USD per CPU, if memory serves me correctly), and fairly fast if the benchmarks are to be believed.

It'll be interesting to see how successful this chip is, since it might cause Intel to rethink its 64-bit strategy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
778 Posts
It will indeed be interesting to see how the new AMD offering will compare to the Itanium as they both push to own the market of the 64 bit platform....I however am still looking forward to see what the offering from IBM will hold for Apple. Hopefully a 64 bit chip with kick ass speeds compared to both those of Intel and AMD.

What is the speed of the new AMD chip anyways??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,263 Posts
How will Intel and AMD market chips with lower mhz than the petiums and Athelons that they have built into a marketing tactic over the last 10 years.
People are going to be confused, they are going to have to start downplaying the mhz , this is where Apple could grow in reptutation with the IBM 970. They will be on an even level in terms of mhz
I really want to know what will be out in a year from now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Opterons (at least the 24x line) currently run at 1.4GHz (240), 1.6GHz (242), and 1.8GHz (244).

The model numbers for the Opterion areinteresting, since it's clear AMD really wants people to stop comparing processors by their clock speed. Instead of, say, Opteron 1.6GHz, we'll see Opteron 242.

What do the model numbers mean? The first digit of the model number denotes how many processors a system based on the chip can contain (e.g., 1 for uni-processor machines, 2 for dual-processor machines, and 8 for eight-way machines). The last two digits of the model denote the performance of the processor relative to other processors in the same family. Thus, an Opteron 244 is faster than an Opteron 240, but not necessarily faster than an Opteron 840.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top