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Worst. Article. Ever.

I'm in the market for a DSLR that shoots video. Saw this headline on the main page and thought, COOL, can't wait to read that review! :rolleyes: Maybe I have to become an insider to read the story?

I feel an epic ehMac Video Podcast rant coming on... :D
 

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Worst. Article. Ever.

I'm in the market for a DSLR that shoots video. Saw this headline on the main page and thought, COOL, can't wait to read that review! :rolleyes: Maybe I have to become an insider to read the story?

I feel an epic ehMac Video Podcast rant coming on... :D
This article is par for the course over at MacWorld. Articles by certain "editors" are decent with a good overall analysis of the information. Usually though, the product coverage articles are nothing more than a reprint of the companies press release with no effort made to fill in the blanks (like pricing, or answers to obvious questions).

They will often do this kind of "round-up" without providing any insight and without having actually touched a product. Most frequently you will see 10 different articles for similar products such as iPad cases and then an 11th as a recap.
 

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Worst. Article. Ever.

I'm in the market for a DSLR that shoots video. Saw this headline on the main page and thought, COOL, can't wait to read that review! :rolleyes: Maybe I have to become an insider to read the story?

I feel an epic ehMac Video Podcast rant coming on... :D
Yeah - I saw that "article" this morning - it's not an article at all, but simply a series of links to previous reviews of all those DSLRs. No useful comparisons. :rolleyes:

You'll get more info if you used Dpreview's features search, followed by the side-by-side comparison once you've narrowed it down a bit.

Do you have a DSLR at all now? If so, then the investment in lenses may be a first determinant. I have a fair investment in Canon glass (several of them L lenses) and that makes me look at Canon's offerings. If you have no substantial investment already, then you're free to look at cameras from all manufacturers to see which suits your needs the best. I just bought a Canon T2i this summer, but I didn't buy it for the video (and in fact haven't used the video yet - it's been a crazy fall and I've barely used the camera, unfortunately) so can't tell you how it is.

What sort of price range are you considering?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Don't buy a DSLR for the video. They all do it now, but it is not a video camera. You will be disappointed.
Impossible to make that recommendation without knowing what I'm using it for. I'll be using it for my video podcasts with an external mic and for taking photos. For that, its a perfect fit.

From the results I've seen with these already, I can't imagine how I'd be disappointed as I've been blown away by the image quality and depth of field you can get with these guys.
 

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Impossible to make that recommendation without knowing what I'm using it for. I'll be using it for my video podcasts with an external mic and for taking photos. For that, its a perfect fit.

From the results I've seen with these already, I can't imagine how I'd be disappointed as I've been blown away by the image quality and depth of field you can get with these guys.
You are using it to take pictures? and you said you wanted video, so you want to make a video? So I think I know why you are using it for.

Because I own a Nikon D300S, I am into photography thats why I know. When you test it try to see if it will auto focus while in video mode. I know mine does not and none did when I purchased mine. Even a Canon 7D does not.

And also see how long of a video you can take on the card size you will have. All I am doing is giving you advice on what I have gone through.
 

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Worst. Article. Ever.

I'm in the market for a DSLR that shoots video. Saw this headline on the main page and thought, COOL, can't wait to read that review! :rolleyes: Maybe I have to become an insider to read the story?

I feel an epic ehMac Video Podcast rant coming on... :D
What have they become?

Garbage, just like Apple.
:)

-Morgan
 

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DSLRs are becoming more and more widely used for video — including in the entertainment industry. SNL used Canon for their titles, as well as digital shorts; Kevin Smith recently mentioned that they used one (not sure of the make) for a portion of Red State, if I recall correctly.
Last season an entire episode of House was shot on the Canon 5D Mark II and it looked fantastic.

To Joker Eh... Video on DLRs is not all created equal and it also depends on the skills of the operator and how you shoot video as to whether or not one will be disappointed.
 

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Last season an entire episode of House was shot on the Canon 5D Mark II and it looked fantastic.

To Joker Eh... Video on DLRs is not all created equal and it also depends on the skills of the operator and how you shoot video as to whether or not one will be disappointed.
I am in total agreement with you. I watched the videos created with my Nikon D300S and was amazed. But these guys have huge budgets and thats what they do. But you have to be behind the camera to use the focus. That may have recently changed on the newest versions but my Nikon D300S and someone I know Canon 7D don't have auto focus for video and they are recent versions. But I would check on the one you choose Mr. Mayor and it may be a factor in your choice. If the Mayor is going to be shooting these himself autofocus on video is a must. Thats all I am saying, just a watch out.

By the way Mr. Mayor your videos look great with whatever you are using.
 

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Sony's Alpha SLT-A55 and SLT-A33 do autofocus in video mode using phase detection, and a "translucent" or partially silvered mirror, and they are available right now. I won't be getting one, as I have way too much Canon equipment, but for somebody who doesn't already have an investment in a particular lens mount, and has video as a high priority may want to look at these two cameras.

It woudln't be a huge stretch to imagine that Canon, Nikon, and maybe some of the other large camera vendors are already working on a response to this initiative by Sony.

Kostas
 
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I want to chime in on the video on DSLR as well.

Firstly, it's not a camcorder, not even close. Most don't have realtime auto focus and the ones that I've seen that do honestly don't work worth crap. Second, it is great and you can get a wonderful shallow depth of field with the right setup but ... if you have no one operating and/or doing focus pull for you DON'T MOVE ... at all. Seriously. If you're going for that nice shallow DOF stuff you have to use a large aperture and if you do you get a very very small target of focus. Depending on how extreme you go it might be an inch or two so if you lean forward or backward while talking == out of focus.

Also things to consider for this, make sure the camera has controllable audio levels and is not an auto-level setup (like all the Canon's are to date) otherwise on-board recording won't be an option for you. I personally use an external recorder (Zoom h4n) and then sync it up in post (using PluralEyes which is amazing).

My honest advice is if you're just going to use it to shoot video for podcast stuff get a cheap dedicated 720p video recorder or some sort and record the audio separately. You may not get the nice shallow DOF from it but I bet it will work well, be reliable, focus as expected, etc. A lot less re-takes after the fact. One of the HUGE disadvantages of shooting on the DSLR is the difficulty to preview full-sized and in real-time to make sure your focus is crisp. What looks good on the 3" LCD may not look so good once you get it up to 720p or 1080p. You can, of course, add on loops to view it in more detail, external monitors to view live video, etc ... or you can just get something that does auto-focus and not worry about it. If you get to the point where you've got a lot of viewers and can warrant having a crew then go with a DSLR but until then I would honestly "keep it simple".

Lastly, yes that it the worst "article" ever ... it's not even really an article. At least it says "edited by" and not "written by" ... I don't think you can claim much credit for writing a single paragraph.
 

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Seriously. If you're going for that nice shallow DOF stuff you have to use a large aperture and if you do you get a very very small target of focus. Depending on how extreme you go it might be an inch or two so if you lean forward or backward while talking == out of focus.
Sorry, but I think anyone who is buying a camera for the shallow DoF knows what shallow DoF means. That's why they are buying it. And if they don't want a shallow DoF, then they will change the aperture or use a different lens.

Your post seems like a blanket statement about DoF on dSLRs and it's misleading. You can easily get a nice wide DoF with dSLRs, just as you can with video cameras.


Also things to consider for this, make sure the camera has controllable audio levels and is not an auto-level setup (like all the Canon's are to date).
The Canon 60D has manual audio control. And I'm sure this is coming to other models (both Nikon and Canon) in the future, and possible to older models via firmware update.


One of the HUGE disadvantages of shooting on the DSLR is the difficulty to preview full-sized and in real-time to make sure your focus is crisp.
The 60D allows you to zoom into any section of your video and check focus. Its screen is also huge and has a lot of pixels. I have used the Canon 50mm f/1.8 with my 60D. I have not used the zoom feature to check focus, and I haven't had any focus issues using just the LCD - even when shooting at 1.8.

Yes, for the typical video camera user, a dSLR is not the right fit. Full-time autofocus is important for most consumers taking video of their vacations and such. But for people who are serious about video, dSLRs offer so much and they are just as valid a choice as a dedicated video camera at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sorry, but I think anyone who is buying a camera for the shallow DoF knows what shallow DoF means. That's why they are buying it.
:) ;)

Back in the film days in the early 90's, I owned a Canon A2 and a 2nd Canon EOS Elan II, and had some serious hardware to go along with it, everything from a beautiful Manfroto tripod, to some nice 2.8 lenses. I've shot about a dozen weddings, worked at a camera store for 3 years selling cameras and took 3 years of photography classes while taking graphic design. :)

It floors me what you get for how little you have to spend on DSLR cameras these days. I've got the itch to start shooting SLR again.

For videos, DSLR is perfect for me. I can't tell you how many high profile video podcasters are using them now. The lenses you can use with them let in so much light, for indoor podcasts where you aren't really following any action, they work amazing. The video quality is awesome.

Having autofocus in not an issue. When shooting myself, I'll have pre-focus. Any other times, I'll have someone else to shoot.

For now, I'm just using my tiny little Canon SD780 that shoots in HD.

This is the exact camera I am using:

 
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Yes, for the typical video camera user, a dSLR is not the right fit. Full-time autofocus is important for most consumers taking video of their vacations and such. But for people who are serious about video, dSLRs offer so much and they are just as valid a choice as a dedicated video camera at this point.
I'm not sure they are "just as valid" ... they have their uses but they have some serious issues that camcorders (or any CCD type video capture device) doesn't. I really depends on your usage. CMOS video cameras, at this point, have some serious moire issues, rolling shutter problem and other issues related to the way they capture (like no proper downsampling of pixels, etc).

I stand by the points I made, but I do agree, the sallow DOF is not a problem if you're not going to be using them like that ... but also consider that CMOS requires more light to get good quality than CCD does so unless you're shooting outdoors or lighting your subjects you may have to use high ISO and large apertures to get what you want.

Anyway it seems that ehmax is familiar with the issues, I just wanted to make sure that he was familiar with them before jumping in.
 

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There is a lot happening in the digital world these days. I've used Canon equipment all my life, I have a DSLR and a bunch of nice lenses but I bought my husband a Sony NEX-3 this year. It shoots HD video, RAW and has a APS-C sensor (crop camera size). With the latest firmware upgrade, it not only autofocuses with its own lenses but also with Sony DSLR lenses attached with an adapter. The reason I purchased this one was for portability - get SLR quality in a small package (since no mirror).

It isn't going to allow you to attach the types of lenses Canon and Nikon use (or actually you can, but it's defeating the purpose of portability) but that isn't really the idea and its own lenses are more than adequate.

Just thought I'd add this as a possible consideration.
 

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Actual Hollywood director friend of mine shoots commercials on the Canon. So apparently it IS good enough for broadcast work.

That said, there's a lot of factors to weigh into a camera purchase. There are literally tonnes of cameras (DSLR and video) that can shoot decent HD, but how many of them have real quality sound, eh? That's right, not many.

Several folks I know "in that biz" have taken to shooting video with the DSLR and recording the audio with a field recorder like the Zoom H4 and then using the amazing DualEyes to marry em back up. Works a treat and I'm looking forward to trying that myself before long.
 

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I just follow Nikon since all my lenses are Nikkor. The only models that auto-focus in HD video mode are the D3100 and the D7000. I have a D5000 but it doesn't auto-focus which is a pain in video mode cause the live video is to small to tell if you are in focus or not.

We have a new Nikon D3100 at work and it's a great little cheap starter camera, comes with a lot of bells and whistles for the price point.
 
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