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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When do you single click and when do you double click?

Just looking for a clear and concise answer to this basic question.
 

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This is how I look at it:

If it's a button; single-click (aka, "OK" button on a dialog box or something similar). Also, to select menu items or the menu itself, single-click as well. I see people double-click when selecting a menu option. :confused: No need for it! Single-click for dock items as well.

If it's a folder or application; double-click to open.
 

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If you are opening a file, opening a folder or launching an application in the finder it is a double click.

Just about anything else is a single click.

--PB
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Simple yes, but now lets mention the dock.
Applications and folders - all single click
Panther SideBar - single click
 

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According to Apple's Human Interface Guidelines:

From Page 74, RE: Double Clicking
Double-clicking involves a second click that follows immediately after the first click. If the two clicks are close enough to each other in terms of time (as set by the user in Keyboard & Mouse preferences) and location (usually within a couple of pixels), they constitute a double click. Double-clicking is most commonly used as a shortcut for other actions, such as pressing Command-O to open a document or dragging to select a word. Because not everyone is physically able to perform a double click, it should never be the only way to perform an action. Some applications support triple-clicking. For example, in a word processor, the first click sets the insertion point, the second click selects the whole word, and the third click selects the whole sentence or paragraph. Supporting more than three clicks is inadvisable.
And for single clicking (found on the bottom of page 73 and the top of page 74):
Clicking has two components: pushing down on the mouse button and releasing it without moving the mouse. (If the mouse moves between button down and button up, it’s dragging, not clicking.) The effect of a click should be immediate and obvious. If the function of the click is to cause an action (such as clicking a button), the selection is made when the button is pressed, and the action takes place when the button is released. For example, if a user presses down the mouse button while the pointer is over an onscreen button, thereby putting the button in a selected state, and then moves the pointer off the button before releasing the mouse button, the onscreen button is not clicked. If the user presses an onscreen button and rolls over another button before releasing the mouse, neither button is clicked.
The 10.3 MB document can be downloaded from the ADC site.

The search in Panther's Preview is the best.
(I've never read the document before, but now I guess is a good time to read now that I have it.)
 
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