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The resident teen saved up to buy one of the Nikon Coolpix optical zoom cameras that CubaMark was mentioning in another thread..http://www.ehmac.ca/photography-focus/92977-high-optical-zoom-cameras.html Her goal was to take decent pictures with it while on a school trip to Ecuador/Galapagos.

Today she texted me from the Galapagos. A "rogue" wave had drenched her new camera and she needed to know what to do. I suggested that she shake as much water out as she can, wipe the outside, remove the battery and the SD card and do not turn it on until it is thoroughly dry. Unfortunately, she's in a fairly remote area and there is no camera shop to rush it in to.

Some locals have given her a sack of rice to bury it in and use as a desiccant (it's very humid there and simple air drying may not be efficient).

Anyone have any better suggestions to help save this camera? The teen is very sad.
I'm guessing this new camera is now a paperweight.
 

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I was thinking rice as I was reading your post. Short of a "real" desiccant, it will work as good as anything.

Good luck.
 

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CIO of CYA
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Salt water or fresh water rogue wave?
 

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Salt water or fresh water rogue wave?
The worst. A dastardly salty rogue.

Another challenge will be how to tell when it's as dry as it is ever going to be. Of course she wants to turn it on ASAP so (in the unlikely event it has survived) she can continue to take pictures.
 

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The worst. A dastardly salty rogue.

Another challenge will be how to tell when it's as dry as it is ever going to be. Of course she wants to turn it on ASAP so (in the unlikely event it has survived) she can continue to take pictures.
Sorry to hear of her misadventure. Hard on any one and even tougher at that age.

I know some credit cards include purchase insurance that may or may not cover this sort of thing.

Sadly the longer she waits the better the odds of recovery.


Edit: I may well be in error, but it seems to me that simply air drying the camera would cause the salt to plate out where as using a desiccant (even rice) might well absorb some of the salt as well as the water??? Also wonder if minute rice might prove to be a better desiccant than regular rice as it is almost designed to absorb water quickly??? Please note that these are just thought not tried and tested theories.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry to hear of her misadventure. Hard on any one and even tougher at that age.

I know some credit cards include purchase insurance that may or may not cover this sort of thing.

Sadly the longer she waits the better the odds of recovery.


Edit: I may well be in error, but it seems to me that simply air drying the camera would cause the salt to plate out where as using a desiccant (even rice) might well absorb some of the salt as well as the water??? Also wonder if minute rice might prove to be a better desiccant than regular rice as it is almost designed to absorb water quickly??? Please note that these are just thought not tried and tested theories.
Thanks eMacMan,

Would you believe she turned it on today, claiming it was "totally dry" and would you believe it didn't it work? Yep, and yep.

Poor girl is distraught, but nuttin I can do about it right now. Naturally, they had many animal encounters today - prime camera time. At least the iPhone with its camera still works.
 

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Indigent Academic
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I suspect the prognosis here is not good. In the case on salt water, the object needs to be thoroughly rinsed (after the battery is removed) in fresh water or, even better, distilled water. A desicant will remove water but it won't remove all the salt. Salt is murder on fine electronics.
 

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White vinegar diluted with water?

I suspect the prognosis here is not good. In the case on salt water, the object needs to be thoroughly rinsed (after the battery is removed) in fresh water or, even better, distilled water. A desicant will remove water but it won't remove all the salt. Salt is murder on fine electronics.
I know it used to remove salt from batteries but electronics gizmos?? Did a great job removing salt from my car mats.
Also on one of my sea-kayaking ocean trips years ago the salt air alone corroded my digital/film camera. The camera itself did not touch water or got splashed on. The camera worked okay for a while then the digital display went bonkers when I got home. Canon repair guy said the whole circuit board was corroded, cost $230, yikes! Garbage it was!
 

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Vinegar = acetic ACID...... :eek: Not good for electronics.

OK for car mats!
 

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she might try cleaning the battery contacts, both on the camera and the battery itself. a Q tip and maybe a drop of rubbing alcohol or hydrogen peroxide maybe. just a drop.
 

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White vinegar is only 5% acetic acid...

Vinegar = acetic ACID...... :eek: Not good for electronics.

OK for car mats!
and even less when diluted of course. I only heard scuba divers use it to clean camera batteries at contact points. But having said that don't use any vinegar since I have NO knowledge of electronics.
 
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