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I was just wondering where is the best information on linking a couple of macs togetrher? Can anyone recommend a good book, web site, or other?
Thanx for responding,
Robert
 

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It mostly depends on which Macs; 2 similar machines (age & OS) is fairly simple.
If they both have firewire ports, a firewire cable is all you need.
If they are different hardware (say, a G4 and a 68030 Powerbook 180) then Ethernet works.
If they are similar, older computers, then use the Serial Ports (printer port) and use AppleTalk.

If you want to share printers, the net, etc., that can complicate things but in general use Ethernet.

Start by searching Help in the Finder. If that's not enough, post back with the hardware/OS of each machine and tell us what you want to do (share files, create a full blown permanent network, etc).
 

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the easiest way is to head on to your local electronics shop and you can usually pick up a really cheap router.

Some of my favourite ones are Dlink and Linksys, although support with linksys is terrible if you ever have to phone them and tell them you are using a Mac.

anyways, you could get a switch, but the nice thing about a router is it will look after all the networking for you with needs for IP addressing and stuff. All you do it plug your ethernet cables into the back of your mac, open up your TCP/IP in Mac OS 9 or your network settings and choose get your IP dynamically.

Once you go through a couple of simple steps on your router, you are off to the races.
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dthompson101:
the easiest way is to head on to your local electronics shop and you can usually pick up a really cheap router.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Do you think a router would have any advantage over an AirPort linkage without a hardware basestation? Future Shop is advertising a Netgear wireless router for $120 (although that price includes a mail-in rebate), and I'm tempted. I'm using the linkage to share files, connect the remote Mac to the internet and share a usb printer (but the latter doesn't seem to work).
 

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If you are going to go for any sort of wireless cheap network router, maybe you should look into the linksys wireless router. They are around the same price and they are very good.

I have used them for a while and they are very reliable. There is a problem with the AFP protocol when it comes to printing, but if you have an IP based printer or a Print Server (I think you can add USB printers via the cups interface) you should be okay.

To get your your cups printer interface, load up a web browser and type in: http://127.0.0.1:631

From there you can modify the printers in your system, and you may be able to get it to work over your wireless network.

Hope that helps
 

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dt101, I have a Q? for you (and oddly, I was just gonna post about this - know nothing):

My small office has one PC (that's all we need). Been thinking of buying a router so that I may bring my lap to work and deal with biz online as well. Now, a router will handle all of that? We can log on and off with the router all hooked up? Not versed in network language yet....

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dthompson101:
the easiest way is to head on to your local electronics shop and you can usually pick up a really cheap router.

Some of my favourite ones are Dlink and Linksys, although support with linksys is terrible if you ever have to phone them and tell them you are using a Mac.

anyways, you could get a switch, but the nice thing about a router is it will look after all the networking for you with needs for IP addressing and stuff. All you do it plug your ethernet cables into the back of your mac, open up your TCP/IP in Mac OS 9 or your network settings and choose get your IP dynamically.

Once you go through a couple of simple steps on your router, you are off to the races.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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Actually the router, once it's connected to your DSL High speed modem, Cable modem or whatever will stay connected forever if you choose to have it stay connected. There are no more problems with the connection manager applications that are used with the individual machines, that router will handle it all.

The router will look after everything for you and all you have to do is connect by launching a TCP/IP based application such as Netscape or your favourite mail client.

A router will handle up to 254 clients on your network simultaniously and will allow all of them to connect at the same time.

So the answer is yes, a router will let you get your biz completed on your laptop :)
 

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If all your macs are running the same OS (9 or 10) the Linksys router will work great because it has a built in switch. But if your machines are using both OS' you need at least two machines using the same OS to eneable the switch function, it works the same with windows machines.
 

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Um, that isn't how a switch works. It is platform independant. All a switch refers to last time I looked was that it is Full Duplex (as in any port can send and recieve data at the same time) and it supplys full bandwidth to each port (as opposed to a hub which shares bandwith among available ports).

A router is the best option, especially if you have a high speed net connection. If you want to go Wireless, don;t just look at Linksys, have a gander at D-Link and Netgear. Both of them make better hardware than Linksys and offer better support.

--PB
 

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A switch will work without regard of the OS's of the networked machines; set up each machine to get the IP address via DHCP.
Works in any OS; I've had various multiplatform setups, at times running OS7/ OS9/ OSX/ Win95/ Win98/ WinXP/ and 2.2x Linux/ all running via a Linksys with no problems beyond each OS's quirky setup dialogs, which you would have to go through anyway to connect hispeed internet, with or without a switch.

A hub is a different animal, but since a eNet switch is typically about $10 more than a similar hub, it's a no-brainer.

As for the poster's question, a router could be overkill. You need to buy 2 eNet cables and a router, but if all he wants is a simple 2-Mac file sharing system, he could do it with just one $5 eNet cable (for example).
 

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Hmmmm..... I wonder if I could connect one mac to another via AirPort, Ethernet, and now FireWire to get blazing fast speed! :D
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by haiggy:
Hmmmm..... I wonder if I could connect one mac to another via AirPort, Ethernet, and now FireWire to get blazing fast speed! :D<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You could connect one Mac to another via Airport. If you have the snow base stations (v2) then you can connect one via the 100 base-T ethernet, use the router on the airport to share the internet connection and if both machines are using OSX, then set up another range of IP's

Ie. the router gives out IP's of 10.0.1.X to your 2 workstations for internet access (which your ethernet adapters would use)

your firewire ports would use another range on a seperate subnet mask such as: 192.168.1.X to distinguish each other between the 2 subnets. This way when you choose "connect to server" you will be accessing your Mac via Firewire @400mbs instead of the measly 10mbs that you get from airport wireless LAN configs.

If you have ever played with IP failover on any sort of Operating System, this is basically how they are set up, except that there are 2 ethernet adapers in each machine as opposed to one ethernet adapter and one firewire adapter.

What you want to do should work fine for you
 

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So how about this than:

I was about to go out and get a Router yesterday - and then upon further research saw that Linksys basically does not actively support Macs. Not that it matters as it's a setup issue. But I'm now looking @ the SMC Barricade ($89.99) and the Asanté (3000 series) models. The linksys I was looking @ is $129.99. Any recs out there?
 

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Well, while Linksys does not support Macs as such, the interface is all web based so it does not matter what OS you are using to configure it.

The SMC as far as I am concerned are trash. I have had nothing but problems with their lower end gear.
Asante however is a solid provider for Mac gear and equipment and I have never had a problem with their stuff from the low end to the high end managed switches.

Their DSL routers as far as I am concerned are second to none for basic useage.

Also, it appears that IP over firewire will allow you to share your internet connection. This is nice so now you really only need your one mac connected to the internet via your DSL/Cable high speed modem and your firewire can share you internet connection to your other workstation. It might save you some money doing it that way.

Just be forwarned that Apple sill not support and problems that you incurr with your firewire IP extension since it is still a preview release. If you have problems with it, you are on your own.

Also, IP over Firewire does not currently support AppleTalk, so you will have to plug the IP in manually in the connect to servr dialoge. Not a big deal for the speed gains you are going to get. 4X faster than 100mb Ethernet.

If you plan on a router, I would suggest either the Linksys or Asante. Just personal preference I guess.

Netscreen and Sonicwalls are your ultimate power as they are your firewall based systems, however you can't get them from future shops or best buy and you pay up words of $2000 + for the type that you want.
 

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Although Linksys doesn't support Macs, it's more an issue with them not having any Mac trained staffers. For the most part, it's a non-issue; any problems I had were always on the PC.

Linksys does issue firmware updates that run on Mac OS, so there's no problem there either.

Strangely enough, when I set up my Linksys with a Mac and a PC, only the Mac could access the webpage setup dialog. The PC insisted on displaying a blank page.

I don't have experience with the other routers, so I can't offer any advice with regard to how they compare. My Linksys router works flawlessly, though. I have used it to network a PC & Mac with a shared ethernet printer without any problems that could be attributed to the router itself. Since I had the Mac, I never bothered to troubleshoot the inability of the PC to display the setup & configuration screen.
 

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if you are worried about Linksys and how well it worked with the Mac. You should not be. Its practically plug-in and play. I don't have experiences with wireless so I cannot compare wireless to wired.

I bought mine (BEFSR41) on Monday and had to get two ethernet cables for the Macs to share the internet. I followed the instructions in setting up the hardware and I was ready to go within 5 minutes. So what there no Mac support, you don't really need it unless you want to play around with the internal settings.
 

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Well, you seem to have the setup that I will be mirroring so I'd love to ask you a few more Q? Hit me with an email when you have a few moments. Linksys it seems to be - as I've not really sen any of the Asanté sold around my way...

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by gordguide:
Although Linksys doesn't support Macs, it's more an issue with them not having any Mac trained staffers. For the most part, it's a non-issue; any problems I had were always on the PC.

Linksys does issue firmware updates that run on Mac OS, so there's no problem there either.

Strangely enough, when I set up my Linksys with a Mac and a PC, only the Mac could access the webpage setup dialog. The PC insisted on displaying a blank page.

I don't have experience with the other routers, so I can't offer any advice with regard to how they compare. My Linksys router works flawlessly, though. I have used it to network a PC & Mac with a shared ethernet printer without any problems that could be attributed to the router itself. Since I had the Mac, I never bothered to troubleshoot the inability of the PC to display the setup & configuration screen.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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•MACMAN• wrote:
"With all this talk of speed and using Firewire to network, I'm surprised no one's mentioned Gigabit ethernet. In theory shouldn't that be 1000 Mbps, or 2.5X faster than firewire?"

It is, but I've found that it's rare that I can saturate a 100Mbps network (especially if I'm moving files around). A 11Mbps wireless link is a different story, though (but it's so much more convenient) :D

"Of course it might get a little pricey if you need to connect to or share an internet service. I hear Gigabit routers and switches are still pretty lofty in the cost department."

After I got my PowerBook (which has a gigabit ethernet port), I looked at the cost of moving one or two of my machines up to gigabit ethernet, and, well, it wasn't cheap. Gigabit NICs are $200+, and the switches are priced to match. I think I'll stick with my 100Mbps network for now.
 
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