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National Post readers across Atlantic Canada will now have to travel to Halifax if they want to buy an actual print copy of the national newspaper.

Following an annual business review of the paper, Post management decided to limit sales to only one Atlantic Canadian market — the metropolitan area of Halifax — as of the end of July. (Source)
I'll take this as one hopeful sign that Conservative support is evaporating in the east. Not that they've done themselves any favours by abrogating the Atlantic Accords vis-a-vis offshore oil & gas, among other things.

Couldn't happer to a "nicer" paper....
 

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I'll take this as one hopeful sign that Conservative support is evaporating in the east. Not that they've done themselves any favours by abrogating the Atlantic Accords vis-a-vis offshore oil & gas, among other things.

Couldn't happer to a "nicer" paper....
It always surprises me to see some say that the media is biased towards the Liberals when the National Pest is clearly the information arm of the Connies...
 

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I think you misunderstand the National Post business model--all of its content will still be available to other newspapers in the chain--just not under the National Post banner.

But the idea that "Neo-Conservatism is in decline" because the National Post decides not to publish its national edition--the analysis is painfully flawed. It would be like me declaring that "Socialism is dying a little bit at a time as the Toronto Star's circulation drops"--as it continues to do, by the way.
 

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To draw any "political allegiance declining" conclusions from the drop in circulation of any given newspaper is folly. Newspaper circulation is falling right across the country and has been for many years.

It is not due to any perceived party support, but rather the result of younger people being weaned on computers and not print versions of newspapers.

Combine that with the growing adult and senior audience getting their news via multi media and you have all the reasons required to understand newspaper circulation drops.

It has nothing to do with party support or affiliation.
 

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Don't get me started on the CBC. At least the NP doesn't exist on the taxpayer dime.:rolleyes:
if private media like the National Pest actually reported the news instead of constantly trying to spin it, we wouldn't need the CBC

but as long as Gobal/Canwest et al keep trying to feed us the right wing bull$hit, the CBC will live on, as long as Harpo doesn't get a majority, which, by the lack of takers of my bet (Fink-Nottle excepted), seems to have no chance of happening anytime before our sun goes nova
 

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Calling either the National Post or the Globe and Mail a national paper is something of a joke, though in the Post's case it goes beyond joke into sublimely ridiculous.

With this move, the Post barely exists east of Ottawa, in Ontario it has negligible numbers outside of the Golden Horseshoe (where it is solidly based in Toronto), and the numbers don't improve until one hits Alberta.

But even there, it is losing its edge in the one city -- Edmonton -- that it outsells the Globe.

Its weekday circulation barely hovers above 200,000 (a drop of more than 10 per cent in six months) and without Atlantic Canada sales will likely slip below that benchmark.

Within Canwest there's discussion on whether focusing solutions on the money-losing Post is hurting its other profitable major papers, like Vancouver and Ottawa, which are also suffering circulation losses. In fact of Canada's 16 largest newspapers (more than 100,000 weekday circulation), eight are showing circulation drops and seven of those, the bottom seven, are Canwest.

It's easy to say the company has to rework itself -- principally by culling The National Post or trimming it back to a financial daily. In its previous life as The Financial Post, it was profitable. People inside and outside the industry have been saying it for several years.

But when or whether the Aspers are going to take that step is anyone's guess.
 

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The individual profitability of one aspect of a media conglomerate isn't necessarily very telling. Operating something at a loss can be a successful strategy if it feeds into something else, or prevents a competitor from entering the field. I don't think the Apers need marketing and financial advice from the rank-and-file.
 

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The individual profitability of one aspect of a media conglomerate isn't necessarily very telling. Operating something at a loss can be a successful strategy if it feeds into something else, or prevents a competitor from entering the field. I don't think the Apers need marketing and financial advice from the rank-and-file.
you mean like when the Pest was given away for free in Toronto?
 

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It's actually a cost-saving move. To get the actual paper here to St.John's costs more than they make on the sale of each paper. As well, the Globe and Mail outsells the Post by 10-1 here in the St.John's area. So, for me, it is no great loss. Now, take away the G&M and that would be a great loss.
 

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I think you misunderstand the National Post business model--all of its content will still be available to other newspapers in the chain--just not under the National Post banner.
You'd think that a newspaper that is known for giving political advice and pontificating would be able to figure out a way to increase its readership...

Or maybe the decline is it part because of the comical editorials they have that even the nutbars have had enough...

Or maybe the shoddy reporting...
 

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You'd think that a newspaper that is known for giving political advice and pontificating would be able to figure out a way to increase its readership...

Or maybe the decline is it part because of the comical editorials they have that even the nutbars have had enough...

Or maybe the shoddy reporting...
they tried giving it away for free in Toronto and even that didn't seem to help
sort of getting the clap for free
:D
 

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It's actually a cost-saving move.
True, but beyond the dollars and cents of the move there are hidden costs, such as the loss in circulation which may affect ad rates, and the absolute loss of the "national" moniker. Instead of indicating prestige, it is as I said in my previous post -- ridiculous.

Long past time to rethink and rework the concept, but the Asper kids aren't anywhere near as bright as their father.
 

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Must be a virus going around



The conservative movement that for a generation has been the source of the Republican Party's strength is in the dumps

Illustration by Kevin Kallaugher

THIRTY years ago Eric Hobsbawm, the dean of Marxist historians, chose as his subject, for the Marx memorial lecture, “The forward march of labour halted?” Things turned out even worse, for his side, than he had expected, thanks in part to the rise of a very American brand of conservatism. But are we now witnessing Mr Hobsbawm's revenge: the forward march of American conservatism halted?

The right has dominated American politics since at least 1980. The Republicans' electoral successes have been striking: five out of seven presidential elections since 1980 and a dramatic seizure of the House in 1994 after 40 years of Democratic rule. Even more striking has been the right's success in making the political weather.

The Republican Party is only the most visible part of the American right. The right's hidden strength lies in its conservative base. America is almost unique in possessing a vibrant conservative movement. Every state boasts organisations fighting in favour of guns and against taxes and abortion. The Christian right can call upon megachurches and Evangelical colleges. Conservatives have also created a formidable counter-establishment of think-tanks and pressure groups.

And many Americans who are not members of the movement happily embrace the label “conservative”. They think of themselves as God-fearing patriots who dislike big government and are tough on crime and national security. In 2004 roughly a third of the voters identified themselves as conservatives; just over 20% identified themselves as “liberal” (as American left-wingers are somewhat strangely called). Conservatives have driven the policy debate on everything from crime to welfare to foreign policy.

Yet today this mighty movement is in deep trouble. Veteran activists are sunk in gloom (“I've never seen conservatives so downright fed up,” says Richard Viguerie, a conservative stalwart). And the other side is cock-a-hoop. Stanley Greenberg, a Democratic pollster, describes the shift from conservatism as “breathtaking”.

...................

The Republicans have failed the most important test of any political movement—wielding power successfully. They have botched a war. They have splurged on spending. And they have alienated a huge section of the population.
The American right | Under the weather | Economist.com

Good riddance.......




a guess the "market ruled" on the Pest. ;) ...and the neo cons.
 
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