ehMac banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My current router a TP-Link is beginning to fail, getting more frequent random dropped internet connections. Have checked with my ISP & confirmed our computers are OK, just the router as the only culprit.

I have a list of features that I feel I need, and the Synology rt1900ac looks like it might be a good choice

Possible to access router & attached storage remotely from iPad ( Mac OS stuff -not critical)
Dual Band WiFi - we also have an Apple Time Capsule connected - extends WiFi.
Latest Wireless network standard (802.11ac) - I noticed some of the cheaper routers are N standard only)
Web base operating system software ("Sinology Router Manager”) looks good - I have not tested this, but
it appears to be something I can easily use. - from my iMac.
Management software looks like something I can understand & use
Ability to connect a USB 3.0 drive (My Book existing 4tb) - use as NAS - I’m considering moving my
iTunes video library [2.5TB] to a NAS, from my iMac, currently on an external G-Technology drive which is giving me problems.
Work with Time Machine - as an alternative option
Work as iTunes server for family network - important consideration. I understand that Synology has
good iTunes compatible software.

Anyone have any experience with this router?
Any suggestions will be appreciated
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
86,945 Posts
Just a question, but why is your ISP not providing you with a router? What am I missing? I use Telus and they supply the router at no cost, most recently an upgraded one with faster download speeds. (Same with Shaw when I was on cable.) I then simply connect the router to my Apple Extreme in bridge mode via ethernet to extend the signal.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,076 Posts
Just a question, but why is your ISP not providing you with a router? What am I missing? I use Telus and they supply the router at no cost, most recently an upgraded one with faster download speeds. (Same with Shaw when I was on cable.) I then simply connect the router to my Apple Extreme in bridge mode via ethernet to extend the signal.
ISP routers are garbage. They're combination devices that don't do anything well, but unfortunately we're stuck with them for the modem component. At least on most of them, you can bridge them and use a proper router.

OP - the Synology router looks great, though I haven't used it myself. If I were choosing between consumer routers, I'd likely go for that or a high-end Asus running Tomato.

I use pfSense for my network, though it's a bit more advanced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the quick replies

Sinc - I had expected my ISP (Vianet) would offer a new router - the previous ISP owners (Zing) supplied my original unit & even replaced it when it failed. However that policy changed with the takeover, and since the only other supplier charges twice the going rate - I'm on my own when it comes to buying routers.

JC - I agree, most of the basic routers appear to be quite cheap, semi disposable junk. This in part why I though of going with a unit which provides more than the minimium functions/features, albeit at a higher cost. I though that perhaps a company like Synology which has a good rep with NAS equipment, would produce a more durable box with reliable software.

I'm still looking at the options, but leaning towards the Synology unit.

Thanks for your input.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top