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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Something very exciting is happening in my household. We are finally getting high speed internet access via adsl. :D Goodbye to the painfully slow modem.

As I have been a modem user all my computer life, this raises some questions for me. I was told I will need to purchase a hub and extra ethernet cable in order to connect 2 computers (both Macs). Are these cross platform compatible? or do I need to buy Mac specific ethernet cable? Whitehorse has no Mac specific retailer so that leads me to my next question.

Can anyone recommend a mail order/internet retailer for Mac products (other than Macwarehouse). It is not easy being a Mac user in the Yukon.

Because of the new connection, I now wonder about firewall protection. I am not sure what it is, how it works, or what is available.

I am also wondering about virus protection. I have been using the internet for a number of years and never had virus protection. I know there are lots of viruses, but not many Mac specific. I am interested in your though's on this and what others are using.

I really value this communities knowledge and opinions and look forward to some on this subject.
Although I may not participate as much as others, I am regularly reading and keeping in touch (this has been my browser's home page for awhile). Mac lovers are grossly out numbered here in the Yukon so I rely on this community for safety in numbers.
Thanks
 

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I don't believe there is any platform specific ethernet cable. I've picked up ethernet cable all over the place. If you have a Business Depot or Basics Office Products, they should have it. Pretty well any computer store should have ethernet cable too.

I would recommend getting Norton SystemWorks. It includes Norton Anti-Virus as well as Norton Utilities. I use it to maintain and protect my computers. Norton also regularly posts virus updates you'll be able to download to keep your computer protected. Norton also has a firewall software solution, but I've never used it so I really can't comment on that particular product, but check out their website: www.symantec.com Symantec
 

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Hey Kirtland, congrats on the move to broadband. Jealousy! Jealousy!

Here's the deal on sharing your signal with other household Macs:

You'll need:

1/ ADSL modem
2/ Router with multiple ports (one per computer. I think a five-port is the smallest available, which will more than take care of your needs)
3/ Ethernet cable to string 'em all to the router.

If you just connect a hub to your adsl modem, you'll find that one or both of the Macs will have difficulty accessing the internet. The adsl modem provides an IP address for one computer... basically, first come first serve. In order to share your IP address, you need the Router to act as a "front end" to the modem. The router provides the Macs with individual addresses, then translates the input/output with the internet.

MacAddict http://www.macaddict.com magazine had a very good "How-To" on the subject about a year ago... you might be able to find it in their online archive.

Ethernet cable is Ethernet cable, no "Mac-specific" flavour out there. Someone once wrote that you should only buy "Category 5" ethernet cable, but I haven't seen anything other than Cat-5...

Re: Virus threats. Well.... I have Virex installed, just because it came with my .Mac membership and I thought "better safe than sorry". However... just read a few days ago how there are NO viruses (virii) out there for OS X (with the exception of Microsoft Word Macro Viruses). Basically, if you use Microsoft products, it's best to have an anti-virus package.

You might want to consider picking up .Mac since you'll have broadband and can take advantage of the iDisk, Backup, iCal, etc. via your broadband connection. If you're thinking of shelling out $$ anyway for an anti-virus package, a few more bucks for .Mac would seem to make sense.

On the issue of firewalls, I'll leave more knowledgeable community members to answer you.

As for mailorder, MacWarehouse is the big one with a shop in Canada, at Canadian prices. You might also want to check out Apple's Canada store: http://www.apple.com/canadastore

Good luck!
M.
 

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May I respectfully disagree with Coyote on SystemWorks. We had to pull it off of our Quicksilver PowerMacs only a day after installing. I've seen other posts in user forum areas as well that indicate issues with that product. There was also, I believe, a caution that advised purchasers to use only the latest version certified for OS X.. something to do with disk directory structures.

We do keep SystemWorks around, but just use the CD for Disk Doctor fixes and such, but we definitely will not be using any of its "resident" programs, like "FileSaver", which seemed to give a performance hit.

I'm a big fan of Disk Warrior, though. Solid and does the job. Also has a nice defrag utility.

My $0.02,
Mark
 

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I believe all routers come with built in firewalls.... if not, they should! So if you are going to pick up a Router you got yourself a firewall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all for the speedy reply and info. I have ordered an Asante router; I will support companies that make an effort to be "Mac friendly." It looks like most do come with a firewall.
Looking forward to retiring my modem.
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Mississauga:
Asanté, the "Mac friendliest" router... and easy to set up.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yep! Check out my signature. I give'em infinity stars, plus one. :D
 

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[enter geek]

Routers dont come with firewalls, they are firewalls. They use a process called Network Address Translation (NAT) that shields your IP from the Wide Area Network (WAN), otherwise known in this exercise as the internet.

There are 1 port routers to be had, but are more designed to get existing Local Area Networks (LAN) online. Since from your descrpition you don't have a LAN, then you don't need to worry. 4 port routers are the next size up. They havfe 4 ports and an uplink port (usually).

Pretty much all routers can be used by a Mac these days, as they are administered either by web browser or telnet. The question is whether the company that makes your router will support it being used with a Mac.

Asante is one of the best, but Netgear and Proxim (which is what I think Farallon changed their name to) are also good.

Yes, all ethernet cables are cross platform.

[exit geek]

--PB
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Not only is Asante Mac friendly but I got in on a $20US manufacturers rebate. Even friendlier!
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kirtland:
Not only is Asante Mac friendly but I got in on a $20US manufacturers rebate. Even friendlier!
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Gee! That's even friendlier than mine was! Good deal.

Once you're up and running with your ADSL, it'll be like owning a new computer.
 

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just to clear things up, a router is not a firewall. Many routers simply route information between networks, and can allow unfettered access to either network if so configured.

However most routers that home users or small offices would purchase act as a firewall, and as such are the ideal solution for home broadband users.

James
 

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Definitely watch out with Norton Systemworks... it's a good and bad thing. It protects your system from viruses and can fix file management problems, but it also sometimes causes a few problems. Many people including me have had problems with Norton Anti-virus's autoprotect... it's caused a few kernel panics. If you install Norton Anti-virus, disable autoprotect.

The Retrospect Express backup software included with it is very good though. I've had no problems with it. Make sure you get the update. Backups are always good.

You could cover yourself off with a new .Mac account which apparently provides backup and anti-virus software.

Looks like you got all the network help you need.
 

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Kirtland, I envy you with adsl in the Yukon. I live just outside the Nation's Capitol and still have to struggle with a 56k Modem.
No cable either. Thank God for satellite. At least tv is good.
Cheers,
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Kirtland, I envy you with adsl in the Yukon. I live just outside the Nation's Capitol and still have to struggle with a 56k Modem. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Gotta love the Yukon. Aside from the beautiful land we are surrounded by and live on, the Yukon Government has a program called Connect Yukon. They work with Northwestel to provide ADSL throughout the territory. All communities between Whitehorse and Dawson City have high speed connections. Towns with as few as 200-300 people have ADSL! Its kind of ironic that the outlying communities got connected before the outskirts of Whitehorse. Oh well, by this time next week, I'll be connected with high speed.
Cheers
 

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WOW! I'm impressed with the Yukon's progressive attitude to getting everyone connected... kinda puts Ontario to shame. I know of areas immediately outside Toronto that continue to suffer with poor dial-up services.

I hope you'll become the Yukon ambassador for ehMac, and especially for the Mac platform! ;) Sounds like you need to recruit a few more locals and push for the "switch".

Cheers!
 
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