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I have an old iMac G3 that had OS9 and Tiger (10.4.11) on it. I had to repartition the HD and in removing the second partition and expanding the first to take up the whole drive, I lost the "blessed" OS9.2.2. The iMac still runs classic, but if you go to the Startup Disk preferences, OS 9 on that disk is shown and if you choose it, it stall because it can't find a startup disk and worse, if you restart it with the options key, OSX bootup option is no longer shown. To remedy this problem I want to either reinstall OS9 without partitioning or reformatting the HD, or if this isn't possible, to set it in a way so that Classic still works but the option to boot from OS9 no longer shows from Startup Disk. (I will be selling this Mac and I don't want an inexperienced user to run into the same problem I did.) I actually have an OS9 install disk (9.2.1) - can I just reinstall OS9 onto my HD with this disk in a way that doesn't remove OSX?
 

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Normally on those generation Macs, both System 9.x and OS X were installed and lived together on the same top and first partition.

If the OS 9's "System Folder" still exists, it may only need to be 're-blessed' to work properly, but as "Classic Mode" runs, it may just be the way you're trying to boot into the Classic System 9.x. and no re-install of System 9.x will be required.

For some info see: Is there a way to get OS 9.X onto a G3 iMac with OS X? - Macintosh Garden etc. with a Google search on 'Installing OS9 on a G3 iMac running Tiger' or maybe better to try 'Installing System 9 on a G3 iMac running Tiger'.
 

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I always found it preferable to run OS 9 and OSX on separate partitions if it was required to boot from 9. Saved me a lot of headaches over the 5 years I needed to run both OSs.

To boot into OS 9 the drive must have OS 9 drivers installed. As well as the OS 9 system folder being properly blessed. I honestly cannot remember if the OS 9 drivers were installed at the root level or on the individual partition. I suspect the former.

There is a way to bless the OS9 system folder via Terminal. I will try to look that up sometime later today.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
....

If the OS 9's "System Folder" still exists, it may only need to be 're-blessed' to work properly ....
That's what I wondered about as well. Question is how to do so.

For some info see: Is there a way to get OS 9.X onto a G3 iMac with OS X? - Macintosh Garden etc. with a Google search on 'Installing OS9 on a G3 iMac running Tiger' or maybe better to try 'Installing System 9 on a G3 iMac running Tiger'.
Thanks, pm-r. This posting seems to imply that I can install OS9 onto the HD with X already on it without destroying X. I might try that, but I would stop if I saw an error message about destroying data.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I
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To boot into OS 9 the drive must have OS 9 drivers installed. As well as the OS 9 system folder being properly blessed. I honestly cannot remember if the OS 9 drivers were installed at the root level or on the individual partition. I suspect the former.

There is a way to bless the OS9 system folder via Terminal. I will try to look that up sometime later today.
Thanks, eMacMan. I did find an article that suggested trying to start the Mac from the System 9 disk, run Drive Setup, and if the option, Update Driver is shown, that may do it. I'll try that tonight. But even if that works, would it bless the system folder?

If you find a way to bless the folder with a Terminal command, please post. :)

The other thought I had was what if I simply threw away the System file inside the OS9 System Folder? Would this stop the OS9 boot option from showing but still permit Classic to run? That would be better than reformatting the drive.
 

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Try Mac OS: Reblessing Old System Folder After Clean Install

As I recall, you can bless an OS9 "System Folder" by moving it and/or the "Finder" as well to the Desktop, do Get Info on both and move them back to where they were.

I don't know if the old "System Picker" is still available or whether it worked with System 9, and maybe System 8.x was the last supported Mac OS. Classic only also I believe.
 

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Yup. Re-blessed is almost exactly the same as Pre-blessed except that Pre-blessed has an additional p at the beginning.
 

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Thanks, eMacMan. I did find an article that suggested trying to start the Mac from the System 9 disk, run Drive Setup, and if the option, Update Driver is shown, that may do it. I'll try that tonight. But even if that works, would it bless the system folder?

If you find a way to bless the folder with a Terminal command, please post. :)

The other thought I had was what if I simply threw away the System file inside the OS9 System Folder? Would this stop the OS9 boot option from showing but still permit Classic to run? That would be better than reformatting the drive.
So far I am striking out. Probably somewhere in my old archives. If you are very comfortable with Unix you can check out the manual file for the bless command. That command line is:
man bless
 

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Discussion Starter #10
MacOSX, or at least Tiger, is surprisingly resistant to OS9. I tried installing OS 9.2.1 on a separate partition I created on the internal drive. It installed all right, but when I tried to boot it up, I got a question mark in the folder, indicating that it couldn't find a system. It seems like once you mess with partitions with a tool other than Apple's Disk Utility (which wouldn't change partitions without destroying what's in them), that it's almost impossible to install OS 9. I did the partitioning with Drive Genius, which did warn me that once I did that, I would not be able to boot in OS9. It turns out that they were right, even after reinstalling the system. I even tried copying a system folder from the CD installer to the system with no luck.
 

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I've found Tiger and OS9 work well together.
When you partition a drive in OSX using Disk Utility, you will need to mark the little checkbox to add OS9 drivers. If you didn't check that little box, then you won't be able to boot into OS9 from that partition. You may not even be able to see the partition in OS9, but I'm not sure of that. The Disk Utility in Tiger definitely does have this feature, but I'm not sure if it's still available in newer versions of OSX.

The other thing I would be suspicious about is the OS9 version you're using. If it's an OS9 version that was intended to be used in "Classic" mode in OSX, then it might not have everything required to actually boot into OS9 after installation. I can't confirm this, but I definitely know there no problem installing a regular OS9 boot disk that was NOT included as part of an OSX package.

OS9 is also extremely portable. Just copy and paste to another drive. OSX is the fussy one.

Here's what I would do. Clone your existing OSX onto a different drive, and then make sure that clone can boot properly on your machine. Once you have that assurance, then you can partition the original drive using Disk Utility in Tiger from the cloned drive. I'd go with 3 or 4 partitions personally. An OS9 system usually needs less than 1 Gig, so 2 to 4 Gigs should be plenty for any OS9 boot partition. I always like to have 1 backup partition for each operating system so that you can boot into your backup if something starts going on the fritz on your primary OS partition. This means that if you're using both OS9 and OSX, you would need at least 4 partitions. That might be overkill, but that's what I like to do.

When you partition the original drive using Tiger, make sure all the partitions have the OS9 drivers. It won't hurt anything even if that partition is only being used for OSX.
 

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If you want to bless the OS9 system, then go to the OS9 "System" folder, and then click on the file within that also has the name "System". You'll either get an error message or it will open it as a list of contents. Just trying to open that file will usually result in the System folder being blessed (if you do it while booted in OS9 from another drive). It might also work if you do the same steps in OSX, but I can't remember if that works too.

You can also select a startup disk using the Startup Disk preference in the Tiger System Preferences. You can access System Preferences in the Dock. If there is a blessed OS9 system folder, it should show up in the list of available startup disks. If there isn't an OS9 system disk in the list, then try the steps above.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You can also select a startup disk using the Startup Disk preference in the Tiger System Preferences. You can access System Preferences in the Dock. If there is a blessed OS9 system folder, it should show up in the list of available startup disks. If there isn't an OS9 system disk in the list, then try the steps above.
Unfortunately, seeing that disk in Tiger as a startup disk doesn't necessarily mean it is blessed. What happens to me on my iMac G3 is I see the OS9 startup disk, but when trying to start up from it, I get the flashing question mark in the system folder.

I think that the key is using Disk Utility to generate your partitions, not any other program.
 

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Bottom basic Mac "System" OS 9 and previous rule is if the "System Folder" folder has a genetic folder icon, it's not blessed, and even if it is, the procedure to boot into Classic on supported Macs can vary.

But if as you said in your first post, " (I will be selling this Mac and I don't want an inexperienced user to run into the same problem I did.) I actually have an OS9 install disk (9.2.1) ..." why don't you just "nuke and pave" it's HD, and maybe even do an erase and new partition and do a zero out option and use the original OS install disks to get it to it's original state, and sell it complete with all the Apple OS install disks included.

End of your problem IMO and it just might work properly for the new user. ;)

PS: The "Blessed" System Folder folder on such a Mac should look something like this shot with 9.2.x installed:
 

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... I had to repartition the HD and in removing the second partition and expanding the first to take up the whole drive, I lost the "blessed" OS9.2.2....
Did you really remove only the second partition? From what I recall, reformatting with the OS9 drivers checkbox selected would cause multiple extra partitions to be created. They were typically very small, but contained the drivers necessary to boot into OS 9 (as opposed to running in Classic mode).

For this reason, I don't think "blessing" the System Folder will be sufficient, and I would imagine it would take a fair bit of tinkering to figure out how to manually recreate those partitions and their contents without affecting the current OS X installation. Reformatting and starting over would probably be more straightforward.
 

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Did you really remove only the second partition? From what I recall, reformatting with the OS9 drivers checkbox selected would cause multiple extra partitions to be created. They were typically very small, but contained the drivers necessary to boot into OS 9 (as opposed to running in Classic mode).

For this reason, I don't think "blessing" the System Folder will be sufficient, and I would imagine it would take a fair bit of tinkering to figure out how to manually recreate those partitions and their contents without affecting the current OS X installation. Reformatting and starting over would probably be more straightforward.
Agreed!
 

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Did you really remove only the second partition? From what I recall, reformatting with the OS9 drivers checkbox selected would cause multiple extra partitions to be created. They were typically very small, but contained the drivers necessary to boot into OS 9 (as opposed to running in Classic mode).

For this reason, I don't think "blessing" the System Folder will be sufficient, and I would imagine it would take a fair bit of tinkering to figure out how to manually recreate those partitions and their contents without affecting the current OS X installation. Reformatting and starting over would probably be more straightforward.

I'd say you are correct, no OS9 drivers = no Classic boot.

And as the OP mentioned, Drive Genius was used to create the partition and it sure doesn't have an option to install the OS9 drivers, but then again if the original partition was left intact and had the original OS9 drivers tiny partition, then they should possibly still be intact.
 

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You should be able to partition the drive while booted from the OS9 installer disk. This would guarantee that the OS9 drivers get installed.

If I remember correctly, you use Drive Setup in OS9. The downside with the OS9 utility is that it might not recognize some non-Apple drives.
 

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There should be a way of installing OS9 without partitioning or screwing up the rest of the computer. I've done that before on a G4 and it worked fine.
 

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There is a way but why bother with all the variations and methods?

As I suggested in my post #14, just do a complete "nuke and pave" and use the original install disks to at least get that Mac ready for sale as the OP was intending.

Just a few hours and it could have been ready to boot and sell days ago, and with everything working.

Any other OS update/upgrades should be left to the new user, their choice, and just as if they had purchased it brand new some years ago. And not even with any user setup, just leave that for them to do.
 
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