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WOW!:clap:
 

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Saw a link to it on a photo forum earlier today. Coolest thing I have seen in ages.

Dig the music as well; will probably buy the Jan Jelinek album on iTMS this week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Saw a link to it on a photo forum earlier today. Coolest thing I have seen in ages.

Dig the music as well; will probably buy the Jan Jelinek album on iTMS this week.
Nice. Funny, but I might have mentioned this before, wonder why we don't have dedicated LEGAL music thread here.

But ya, I love the soundtrack as well - very apt w/ visuals.

You actually might like this as well - This video is totally unrelated to this thread but... it's a cool little vid. Fan video for this producer called Kuedo.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D93uYqM-iGU

Enjoy.
 

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Caught that fly-over on one of the science forums - fantastic, fragile....the only one we've got.
 

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German film editor Michael Koenig posted the video on Vimeo this past weekend. When the mainstream media caught on two days later the video became viral.

A few people who saw the video in the first day or two asked what camera the International Space Station (ISS) astronauts used to capture the images. Koenig didn't know but a fellow left a comment saying that it was a special low-light 4K camera made by the Japanese broadcaster NHK. Koenig has since removed this reference because it is incorrect. Someone else commented about the error, and I emailed him directly to give the correct information.

All the nighttime images in the time-lapse video were taken with a Nikon D3S DSLR, with many images shot with the Nikon 17-35mm lens at 20mm, f/2.8, ISO 12800. D3S has the best low noise high ISO DSLR imaging sensor on the market.

I believe Koenig actually downloaded all the still images to compile the time-lapse video. Notice that there are different video segments in the time-lapse movie. NASA had in fact created the same segments and posted them as separate videos. You can find them here. However, the NASA version is only 840x559 pixels whereas the version that Koenig posted is 1280x720 pixels.

In the Koenig video, the opening sequence shows the ISS passes from southwestern U.S. to over the lower Great Lakes. Here's an image from this sequence. The 1st image is the thumbnail image on the NASA Earth obs. website with minimal or no processing other than converting the original RAW file to a JPEG. Photo ID ISS029-E-12620.

The 2nd larger image is an enhanced version. I applied Fill Light to significantly brighten the image. Wide areas were under clouds. There was a bright cluster of lightning flashes near New York City.

The distinctive thin bright arc just above the Earth's limb is the airglow layer.

There is an upward glow to the right of the rightmost edge of the aurora. This may be zodiacal light.

A crewmember of ISS Expedition 29 took the image on Sept. 29 at 04:07:32 EDT (080732 GMT).

Image specs:
Nikon D3S, Nikon 17-35mm lens @ 20mm, f/2.8, ISO 12800, auto white balance, exposure time: 1.3 sec.

The original JPEG measures 4256x2832 pixels.

Koenig writes on the Vimeo page that he intends to upload the full HD video. That would be one heck of a download to view it.
 

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