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wow. I never thought Videotron had reached that speed at my home office!

EDIT : Pretty consistent results with the test on Videotron's own site. (see below)
 

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What kind of connection is that, where do you work, and where can I apply? :D
The backbone of internet was a military conduit (the original "series of tubes"). Later, educational infrastructures were added, those for universities and some colleges. After that, the rabble.

We're hardwired into the internet here. I have to take off my 'virtual reality helmet' just to leave my desk. Presumably, there is human life outside the compound... I just don't get to see it. It's a 1000MB/sec. connection to the backbone core.

Seriously, the building I'm in has 4 fibe uplinks to the core, each like this, and there are scores more like it:
System: ____ - Backbone, Building Uplinks & Central Servers
Interface: 100BaseFX - Building Fibre Uplink
Max Speed: 1.0 Gbits/s
 

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Checked my Rogers connection today... not bad. Nowhere near HowEver's speed, but good for regular broadband.

 

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i love these tests. not to see if my connection is the best b/c it's usually just average (still good enough for me).

I love these tests b/c of the mindboggling results.

honestly - it took 63 ms for me to ping a server in ME (more than 300 miles away).

trying to comprehend that is almost like getting a brain freeze eating ice cream...

doh!
 

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i love these tests. not to see if my connection is the best b/c it's usually just average (still good enough for me).

I love these tests b/c of the mindboggling results.

honestly - it took 63 ms for me to ping a server in ME (more than 300 miles away).

trying to comprehend that is almost like getting a brain freeze eating ice cream...

doh!

The speed of light in a strand of fibre is approximately 200km/ms. 300 miles is 480km. 63ms is actually really bad. If I ping a node in Calgary (~3,500 km driving distance) I get a round trip time of around 55ms. So based on 200km/ms and since we know that the fibre routes are not linear, this is about what we'd expect, given the 10ms it takes to get from my home connection to the ISP peering point. :)
 
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