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In general, I've found that VPNs can slow down speed a little at times, but not perceptibly. Some streaming services, like Amazon Prime, won't connect under VPN because the IP Address is blocked — you have to pause VPN when watching. Only other thing to remember is that if you select a connection point in another country, let's say Germany, Google localizes to that city and country. My VPN allows me to connect to a server in Toronto.
 

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I agree, your place, your internet service, should be your rules.

That said, you can safely ignore any service provider notices you might receive in Canada. No one has ever been prosecuted or suffered for such downloads in Canada, which are not illegal. There are unscrupulous entities claiming to represent intellectual property owners who can compel your service provider to notify you--but that's it. The service providers do this reluctantly, and they don't care what you do so long as you pay your monthly fees. This is absolutely not a concern of any police force in Canada.
Ack never saw this.

This is absolutely not the case.

Do not ignore those warning and continue to download. That is not sound advice.
Get some vpn software etc. if you have to continue torrenting.

You are correct law enforcement does/has not been involved. However this is a civil matter. And unfortunately there have been prosecutions or rather threats of prosecution. Many of the studios have setup with Canadian law firms. Our ISPs (except Teksavvy which fought it) happily turn over client and IP data to these firms. They do pursue individuals but offer 1 time settlements. You don't hear about it because the amounts are trivial (relatively).

This is the case with illegal downloading, satellite service pirating, etc.
 
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I believe my friend agreed to settle for $300. Again, this was not for downloading the content, but for sharing it through the torrent after the download was complete.
 

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Really?


>1. WHAT IS TEKSAVVY DOING TO PROTECT ITS CUSTOMERS’ PERSONAL INFORMATION?
Subscriber information, individually-issued Internet Protocol addresses, and the link between them, are all personal information. Our users have a strong privacy interest in it. That privacy interest is protected by federal privacy legislation, and by the values of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms TekSavvy has always fought for our users’ rights. We take that privacy interest very seriously.
We will not provide your personal information to any copyright claimant unless we are ordered to do so by a court. And we will take every opportunity to make sure that our accountholders receive notice when a court is asked to disclose their personal information.



Ack never saw this.

This is absolutely not the case.

Do not ignore those warning and continue to download. That is not sound advice.
Get some vpn software etc. if you have to continue torrenting.

You are correct law enforcement does/has not been involved. However this is a civil matter. And unfortunately there have been prosecutions or rather threats of prosecution. Many of the studios have setup with Canadian law firms. Our ISPs (except Teksavvy which fought it) happily turn over client and IP data to these firms. They do pursue individuals but offer 1 time settlements. You don't hear about it because the amounts are trivial (relatively).

This is the case with illegal downloading, satellite service pirating, etc.
 

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Really?


>1. WHAT IS TEKSAVVY DOING TO PROTECT ITS CUSTOMERS’ PERSONAL INFORMATION?
Subscriber information, individually-issued Internet Protocol addresses, and the link between them, are all personal information. Our users have a strong privacy interest in it. That privacy interest is protected by federal privacy legislation, and by the values of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms TekSavvy has always fought for our users’ rights. We take that privacy interest very seriously.
We will not provide your personal information to any copyright claimant unless we are ordered to do so by a court. And we will take every opportunity to make sure that our accountholders receive notice when a court is asked to disclose their personal information.
Please read my unedited post. I specifically named Teksavvy as the sole ISP that was NOT turning over customer data.
 

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Please read my unedited post. I specifically named Teksavvy as the sole ISP that was NOT turning over customer data.
unless we are ordered to do so by a court.
So not quite as black and white a statement. I remember getting a warning many years ago that my IP had been identified as using torrents to share copyrighted materials. That is all that happened. I got nervous, so I stopped what I was doing.
 

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Ugh, right you are.

Rogers also does not turn over customer data, sending a letter similar to Teksavvy's: "we won't identify you, but we have to send you this stupid letter."

Almost all of the requests for customer data come from troll companies that are hoping to scare people into settling matters quietly. These people are basically self-identifying out of misplaced fear.

Please read my unedited post. I specifically named Teksavvy as the sole ISP that was NOT turning over customer data.
 

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Ugh, right you are.

Rogers also does not turn over customer data, sending a letter similar to Teksavvy's: "we won't identify you, but we have to send you this stupid letter."

Almost all of the requests for customer data come from troll companies that are hoping to scare people into settling matters quietly. These people are basically self-identifying out of misplaced fear.
As I pointed out though, my ISP threatened to cancel my service over a "port-sniffing virus" they could not name. That was clearly the activity of my torrent program. Once I turned it off for a few weeks, they said the "virus" was gone.
 

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Ugh, right you are.

Rogers also does not turn over customer data, sending a letter similar to Teksavvy's: "we won't identify you, but we have to send you this stupid letter."

Almost all of the requests for customer data come from troll companies that are hoping to scare people into settling matters quietly. These people are basically self-identifying out of misplaced fear.
This is simply not the case. Teksavvy fought the release of customer data in court. They had a partial win. Bell, Rogers, Telus, etc. did not even fight it. They absolutely turn over customer data to any law firm that wants to launch a suit.

3400 Canadians were sued over Game of Thrones downloading by a Toronto law firm.

Your advice here to ignore those warnings is, respectfully, not good.

As I mentioned, if someone has to download or cannot stop users on their network downloading then they should use a VPN. That product exists for a reason.
 

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Rogers' message:

"...we will not tell the sender who you are unless we are compelled to do so by a court order."
 

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I believe that this has less to do with privacy and more to do with Rogers' having to do work on behalf of these legal firms for which it is not compensated -- just my opinion.
 

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3400 people may have been sued for various things, including Game of Thrones, but was anyone sued successfully?

That is, did a court order anyone to pay the trolls?


This is simply not the case. Teksavvy fought the release of customer data in court. They had a partial win. Bell, Rogers, Telus, etc. did not even fight it. They absolutely turn over customer data to any law firm that wants to launch a suit.

3400 Canadians were sued over Game of Thrones downloading by a Toronto law firm.

Your advice here to ignore those warnings is, respectfully, not good.

As I mentioned, if someone has to download or cannot stop users on their network downloading then they should use a VPN. That product exists for a reason.
 

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3400 people may have been sued for various things, including Game of Thrones, but was anyone sued successfully?

That is, did a court order anyone to pay the trolls?
Unknown, although the law firm claimed that some of its cases were being heard by a federal judge in court.

As I suspected, Rogers has nothing against disclosing the identity of its customers associated with an IP address under a court order — they just want the rights holder to compensate them for doing it:

 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
WOW, lots of good feedback here. i did a simple thing that i should of done in the first place. since my father is not tech savy, i went to the firewall setting and blocked Transmission from getting any network communication. will soon get a VPN service soon.
 

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3400 people may have been sued for various things, including Game of Thrones, but was anyone sued successfully?

That is, did a court order anyone to pay the trolls?
Have people settled? Yes.

Do they have to go to trial for you to consider it real? Lawyers are involved, customer information provided, that law (whether we agree or not) was broken.

Handing out advice that ignoring copyright infringement notices and continuing to download is not helpful or prudent.

That's pretty much all I have to add to this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
And response from your father yet?
i told him the reason why i did it. so his yaaaa yaaaaa, is now Damn. So until he changes his attitude about torrent downloads as he was downloading lots of movies which is called for me "pirating".
 

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Lots of free movies of YouTube — just not the latest Spiderman entry you would otherwise pay $14 to see.
 
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