Canadian Mac Forums at ehMac banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Emails relating to B.C.'s Highway of Tears allegedly deleted

A former staffer at the B.C. Ministry of Transportation alleges that more than a dozen emails were deleted in November 2014 following a freedom of information request relating to the Highway of Tears, a stretch of road notorious for cases of missing and murdered women.

The NDP has made public a letter written by former executive assistant Tim Duncan to Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham. In the letter, Duncan says that when he protested an instruction to delete the emails, a ministerial assistant took hold of his keyboard and did it himself.

"When I hesitated, he took away my keyboard, deleted the emails and returned the keyboard, stating, 'It's done. Now you don't have to worry about it anymore,'" Duncan wrote in the letter.

When his concerns continued to be dismissed, Duncan writes, he was told, "It's like The West Wing. You do whatever it takes to win."

Duncan writes that he does not believe the incident was unusual.

"I want to stress that this is not an isolated incident. It is my belief that the abuse of the freedom of information process is widespread and most likely systemic within the [Premier Christy] Clark government. I would ask that you please look into this further."

* * *​

Jennifer Rice, the NDP member of the legislature for the North Coast, spoke to CBC's Daybreak North in February about a freedom of information request she made last November while looking for information surrounding meetings that were supposed to have taken place about Highway 16 (the Highway of Tears)

Rice had specifically requested "records related to meetings held by the ministry on this issue. The time frame for my request is May 15, 2014, to November 19, 2014."

The government, she said, asked for an extension on the request, twice, in order to transcribe written notes.

When the government eventually responded in November, Rice said, she was told, "No records exist. Case is closed."

"Are there records that have been hidden?" Rice asked. "Or are there no records?"​

(CBC)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42,442 Posts
So what was supposed to be in the e-mails and how was it supposed to turn the election?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
So what was supposed to be in the e-mails and how was it supposed to turn the election?
None of the various reports (TImes Colonist, Georgia Strait, etc.) are particularly revealing. This is the most I could dig up:

The complaint came from a former staffer in Transportation Minister Todd Stone's office, who said he was instructed to delete certain emails before they could be captured in a Freedom of Information request related to the Highway of Tears in northern B.C., where 18 women have gone missing or been murdered.

Tim Duncan, Stone's former executive assistant, accused his old ministry and government of widespread and systemic abuse of the FOI law.

In his letter, Duncan said he was asked to find records last November related to public consultations government held for possible solutions to the Highway of Tears.

But when he found records, he said another ministerial assistant came to his desk, took his keyboard, and deleted the emails, before telling him: "'It's done. Now you don't have to worry about it anymore.'"
The government's public consultation on possible solutions to the Highway of Tears has been criticized by the NDP in the past, because officials only met with only a small number of aboriginal women.

The government has also been accused of deliberately withholding records in other past cases. Denham said in a 2013 report that a culture of "oral government" exists where officials are encouraged not to write anything down so that it can't become a public record.
(VancouverSun)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42,442 Posts
Interesting. Thank you for illuminating. Certainly they need to turn over any records that might shed light on that problem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Like a lot of internet-active folks, I do my fair share of armchair quarterbacking / detective / whatever.

In November 2014, a friend of a friend went missing in Prince George. The circumstances surrounding her disappearance lead many to believe it was a crime of opportunity, and that she has become one more victim along the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highway_of_Tears_murders (the definition of which is Highway 16 from Prince Rupert to Prince George - why stop there, and not continue counting the cases of missing / murdered east to Edmonton?)

Today, RCMP in Luduc, just south of Edmonton, say they may be dealing with a serial killer after four women's bodies have been found in close proximity.

Missing women in Whitehouse, Red Deer, Calgary... it seems to be above and beyond what one would expect from normal crime rates / persons missing in non-criminal contexts.

The drive from Prince George to Edmonton is a paltry 7 hours.... and other cities with missing women in a similarly accessible distance... well within the operating range of a murderer, one would think?

There's a retired RCMP officer - Ray Michalko - who has been doing his own investigation in BC for the better part of 10 years, who has expressed frustration at the active-duty RCMP who have told him to back off.

One wonders what the hell is going on out there....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I'm sure there are programmer-types in here who could provide some insight. I'm just an academic, and database development in my mind isn't a huge deal - especially one that appears to be pretty straight forward. But... 5 years and $2.4-million, and still not built? Who is the contractor in charge of this project? :yikes:

RCMP database on missing persons is overdue, over budget

An RCMP database on missing persons and unidentified remains, touted by the Harper government in 2010 as "concrete action" for the problem of murdered and missing indigenous women, is still incomplete and far over budget five years after it was announced.

The national database, plagued by technical problems, won't be fully in place until late 2016 – more than three years after it was supposed to be helping police across Canada solve crimes.

The initial $1.6-million budget for the project has swollen to at least $2.4 million, drawing scarce resources away from other important RCMP initiatives.

CBC News uncovered details of the botched IT project through a document obtained under the Access to Information Act.

"Due to the delays, it will take another year and will cost approximately double the original estimate," says a June 28, 2015, internal evaluation of the project.

* * *​

The database was a key element of a $10-million initiative announced by the minister for the Status of Women, Rona Ambrose, in Vancouver on Oct. 29, 2010, as the Harper government faced pressure to call an inquiry into more than 1,000 murdered and missing indigenous women and girls.

* * *​

The RCMP created a slimmer version of the database in 2014 without much of the system's intended functionality, with software updates planned this fall and next year, Staff-Sgt. Julie Gagnon told CBC News.

* * *​

An internal lessons-learned document says the database project was beset with problems, including delays in getting a basic security clearance for the contractor. The RCMP itself provides security clearances for the government.​

(CBC)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,273 Posts
Sounds like the same idiots who designed Obamacare...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Sounds like the same idiots who designed Obamacare...
1/ Obamacare is not a database of missing people

2/ Obamacare is an American issue, not a Canadian issue.

3/ Why did you feel that you just had to come in and dump an irrelevant post in a thread dealing with an unrelated, serious, topic?

:mad:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,273 Posts
Let's take a closer look at this, shall we?

First off, here is a quote from your OP:

5 years and $2.4-million, and still not built?
This clearly shows your indignation at:
a) A rather lengthy time-line and
b) A rather expensive database.

The Obamacare website took 4 years to build & cost $1.7 billion. The similarities are eerie:

a) A rather lengthy time-line and
b) A rather expensive database.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I really wonder - in your offline life - how people can stand to be around you.

:yawn: :yikes:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,273 Posts
That's it? That's your response?

You know you've hit the nail on the head when all they got is ad hominem.

Funny, I've shown a number of my friends our online exchanges & they all just shake their heads & ask why I bother...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Oh, for the love of whatever magical sky creature you believe in, would you please just go away?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,388 Posts
That's it? That's your response?

You know you've hit the nail on the head when all they got is ad hominem.

Funny, I've shown a number of my friends our online exchanges & they all just shake their heads & ask why I bother...
So! why do you bother?

What is your prime motivations?

Where do you think this conversation will take you?

When will you feel satisfied?

Who is your intended audience?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,273 Posts
<sniff>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,374 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,388 Posts
Gee! Here I thought you were desperately looking for attention. :ptptptptp I guess you're just enamoured with CubaMark.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Well, I guess it's official...

Alberta RCMP offer $100,000 reward for serial killer

Police in Alberta have released a profile of a man they believe has killed several prostitutes in Edmonton, and are offering a reward of $100,000 for information leading to his arrest and conviction.

Along with at least eight deaths that the RCMP are calling confirmed homicides, they're also investigating the suspicious deaths of two other sex-trade workers since 1998.

The bodies of 20 women have been found in rural areas around Alberta's capital since 1983. Four were discovered in the first seven months of 2003 alone.

* * *

A profile prepared by the RCMP's Behavioural Sciences Branch suggests the killer:

Drives a reliable, high-mileage truck, van or sport utility vehicle, and is comfortable driving in rural areas.
Likes to hunt, fish, camp or participate in other outdoor activities.
Has a past or present connection to the area south of Edmonton, including Leduc, Camrose and New Sarepta.
May clean his vehicle at odd times of the day.
"The public should not be discouraged from calling if the person that they suspect does not possess all of these traits," said a police news release about the profile. "We still want your calls.

"The offender is someone's neighbour, friend, brother or son."

Police have also identified three separate killing grounds around the Edmonton area that are being used for the murders.

One is the Sherwood Park area, where four bodies have been found since January 2003.​
(CBC)​
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
86,945 Posts
One has to wonder why you chose this thread to post this story?

It has ziltch to do with the highway of tears, rather it is a rural Edmonton issue and involves women in the sex trade disappearing from the streets of Edmonton.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
As I noted in my post #5 above, pure armchair speculation, it just seems odd that Route 16 from Prince Rupert through Prince George is identified as the hot zone for murders, when Edmonton - a few hours further along - has its own share of unsolved murders.

But sure, I'm not familiar with the area and just see it as an interesting coincidence.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,744 Posts
Perhaps it is related or perhaps not, but I must say that profile would fit at least half of the male population in any rural community close to Edmonton or elsewhere in Alberta.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top