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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all
just wanting to know if there is a hardrive partitioniong tool that is made for mac? in windows there are a number of them(partition magic being the one i use). i know you can partition the hardrive during the OS install but is there one available for after installing?
thanks!
chris

PS-are there any stores that sell kids games for mac? i have a 6 year old who loves powerpuffgirls etc
 

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The only way to parition a hard drive on the Mac side is to reformat the entire disk. You can not split the HD without reinstalling the OS and erasing the disk.
 

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I'm not sure by what you mean "after the install"

There are a number of partition utilities out there, LaCie's Silverlining and FWB come to mind right away.

But when you partitian, you are going to lose your data. I don't think (but I stand to be corrected) that you can partitian an existing drive and keep your data.

Better to reformat your drive, then run the utility to do the partitian.
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Britnell:
I don't think (but I stand to be corrected) that you can partitian an existing drive and keep your data. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nope, you can't keep your data, no matter how big of a pain it is.
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by moonsocket:
so...how big of a partiton should i make for the os?
i want to put the os on one partition and all my apps on the bigger partition so if i have to reinsatll the os i wont lose anything
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you've got a 20 GB HD or bigger, make the Mac OS X parition at least 6 GB big -- so it can use Virtual Memory if needed from that drive, plus, each release of OS X is way bigger than the last. Install 9.2.2 on the OS X parition before OS X, so Classic mode can be used. Install OS 9 or Mac OS X on the other partiton as well so you have a backup bootable drive.
 

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Depending which OS you are using and the size of the hard drive, you can make the partition as big or small as you wish, bit if you give it a gig, you should have lots to spare. I would also recommend having a copy of the final System Folder, as well as a copy of Norton Utilitiesor Disk Warrior on both partitions. That way, if troubles crop up on either partition, you can boot off the one partition to repair the other. As well, if you update the back-up copy of the System Folder occasionally, you will have a good working copy that you can easily fall back on and replicate if the main System Folder ever becomes corrupt
 

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Lars has just made a good point as I was typing the last response. If you will be running OSX and might need Virtual Memory, you will need a larger partition. By the way, do you have a CD burner? You could copy the contents and then justrecopy back onto the reformatted hard drive partitions
 

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I believe Silverlining used to let you resize partitions while keeping your data. I think I remember it letting you increase partition size, but if you tried to shrink one, it gave you many warnings and didn't guarantee you would keep your data.

Does LaCie still make Silverlining?
 

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Podboy, with OSX, would it work OK to install a System Folder on each partition and then just update the "readable" file on the second partition when the main System Folder is complete? Likewise, in case of corruption of the main System, would it work to trash that folder and copy over the backup, leaving the invisible files alone? Or do the invisible files get trashed with the folder? I don't work in X, so I haven't played with this scenario yet.
 

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WARNING ! WARNING !
DANGER LUKE/LUCY ROBINSON !

Peter Scharman:
If you are indeed talking about OS X, then you would have problems backing up the system folder. OS X places invisible files on the root level of the hard drive; just open "Terminal" and type "cd /", then "ls". It'll show you all the things your mac doesn't want you to see, including mach.sym, mach_kernel, dev, etc, and all the other lovely Unix directories and files. You'd have to copy ALL of the system stuff on the root level for it to work properly.

On the other hand, if you were talking about OS 9....umm....nevermind, I guess....

Podboy
 
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