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In Canada? A very long time... The licensing deals are going to be much more difficult here than in the USA and they are the hold up there too.


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I believe the percentage of cord cutters is greater in the US mainly because the networks, with the exception of NBC (Comcast) are independent of the content providers. This they are more interested in doing a deal with Apple to deliver their programming and they provide much of their content online.

In Canada, we have Bell who owns CTV and TSN, Shaw who owns Global, and Rogers who owns all of their stations including the most popular sports channels. The 'content providers' also own the majority of the 'content'. Why would they want to share any of that revenue with Apple?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
hope for the best.

I act. think if Cook can neg. American TV he'll just do the same time here..
But that is then.. ..and this is now
 

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The content providers stall at their own peril. There are a lot of ways to get TV shows on demand without paying for them. People will pay for the service if it's convenient and cost effective. Gouge them, and they'll still watch what they want, you just won't get any money from them.

Content blocking on iOS makes this easier than ever before. You can get just the shows with no ads, no popups, no unexpected switch to the app store, etc.
 

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I would be very happy to pay for a true "a la carte" TV solution -- charge me (let's say) $5 month for each channel I actually want, or let's say $3 per month for the less-popular channels and $6 for the more popular ones, and maybe $10 for the "premium" ones. That would work fine for me, but instead I (used to) pay $50-60 a month for maybe two channels I watched regularly, and wished my system would *allow* me to watch two others that aren't available. So I cut the cable cord.

I miss almost nothing. Some shows I like are available by podcast, some can be seen on services like Netflix or iTunes, shows I want to watch more than once I can buy a DVD or BR box set. I miss Global iPlayer. I miss Turner Classic Movies (for the love of all that's holy, TCM, make a subscription app!). That's seriously about it -- for saving $50 a month, I'll live without TCM.
 

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With a truly á la carte system many channels would go straight down the toilet. Not that that would be such a bad thing... Too many channels depend on "bundling" for their survival!!
 

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We'll likely end up with just a handful of Netflix like services and channels as we know them today will fade away.

People talk a lot about cord cutters, but they forget about a bigger group called cord nevers. Cord nevers would be younger people who never even bother with a cable subscription. I'm in college and the only service I pay for is Netflix, and I also watch a lot of YouTube. Many college and uni students are exactly the same, many don't even bother owning a TV set and just use their computer/phone/tablet to watch content.
 

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We'll likely end up with just a handful of Netflix like services and channels as we know them today will fade away.
That's probably a good thing. Consolidated on demand content is a significantly better experience than broadcast TV. What we really need is a Netflix for live sports (instead of each league having its own app). I pay for the UFC one, but it's not cost effective to subscribe to all of them. Once there is one subscription for all the major sports, it's over for broadcast TV.

People talk a lot about cord cutters, but they forget about a bigger group called cord nevers. Cord nevers would be younger people who never even bother with a cable subscription. I'm in college and the only service I pay for is Netflix, and I also watch a lot of YouTube. Many college and uni students are exactly the same, many don't even bother owning a TV set and just use their computer/phone/tablet to watch content.
My son is that way. Early 20s, on his own, never had a land line and doesn't understand what they were even for, has never had cable and doesn't get why anyone would do that either.
 

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I'm in the same boat, have never had cable or a land line, and didn't buy my first TV till I was 31, my parents were visiting and going stir crazy... lol

I'm a strong proponent of the various subscription services. Personally I'm mostly Netflix, though I tried the free trial of Shomi, I ended up cancelling it as it doesn't have quite enough content I'm interested in for the price... yet, but I suspect that given another 6-12 months it will.

We'll likely end up with just a handful of Netflix like services and channels as we know them today will fade away.

People talk a lot about cord cutters, but they forget about a bigger group called cord nevers. Cord nevers would be younger people who never even bother with a cable subscription. I'm in college and the only service I pay for is Netflix, and I also watch a lot of YouTube. Many college and uni students are exactly the same, many don't even bother owning a TV set and just use their computer/phone/tablet to watch content.
 
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