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Q1) Am I the only one just-a-little-more-than-miffed that we have not seen any G5 speedbump yet?

Q2) is a Dual 2.0 GHz an "overclocked Dual 1.8" or is the latter an underclocked 2.0? They cannot be different motherboards right... And if so, could a hardware hacker tweek one or the other?

Q3) How may of us expect the present 1.6GHz (with the slower SDRAM and non PCI-X) to disappear in place of a single CPU 2.0 with the PC3200 SDRAM and PCI-X?
 

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IBM is known to have higher-clocked chips in production, but are keeping quiet about G5 announcements, as is usual when a supplier has an agreement with Apple to take early production.

There are manufacturing and supply issues to be worked out, but it's inevitable. Curiosity and impatience are very understandable, but won't speed any of this up.

February is traditionally a good month for Apple announcements, though.

My totally uninformed guess, based on past Apple practice, is to keep the general architecture of the entry-level machine as is; it's about cost and shaving 60 or 120 bucks from manufacturing cost is a big deal with this model. If the differences in price become trivial there will be hardware upgrades, but not till then.

I don't think it likely that Apple would have gone to the trouble of engineering a specific motherboard for the entryG5 if they didn't expect to recover those costs with a reasonably long (in "computer years") production timeframe.
 

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All G5s have DDR ram! I am getting fed up with people bad mouthing the G5 1.6, the only big difference is the speed of the DDR ram, and the lack of PCI-x, which I have yet to see utilized.
 

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Q1) I'm another one patiently waiting for the new speed-bumped G5's to come out.

Q2) It could be neither. The chips in them could easily be 1.8 or 2.0 G5 chips. Why do people always think Apple is overclocking or underclocking their CPUs? Last time people thought they were overclocking the G4 to get the 1.42 GHz G4 because Motorola's web page was old. As far as we know IBM is producing G5's at various speeds from 1.6 Ghz to 2.x Ghz. Apple would only be overclocking or underclocking the chip if they couldn't get a chip at the proper speed from IBM. Besides overclocking or underclocking is actually somewhat of a grey area, because chips are rated based on testing and meeting requirements at various temperatures.

There are not different motherboards for the dual 1.8 and dual 2.0 because the motherboard allows for different front-side bus frequency's (the bus must be half the speed of the G5 - I have seen rumors that the bus/chip speed ratio on future G5s could be 1:3 or 1:4 possibly). Allowing for different front-side bus frequencies allows for G5's of different frequencies. The bus frequency of the motherboard is set I believe by a couple of resistors on the current motherboard.
 

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All G5s have DDR ram! I am getting fed up with people bad mouthing the G5 1.6, the only big difference is the speed of the DDR ram, and the lack of PCI-x, which I have yet to see utilized.
Nah, there's nothing wrong with it. Like Gordguide side it's a lower end Tower. I also like to think of it as a transition Tower since it has PCI slots; to allow users to transition to a G5 without worrying about if a PCI card will work in a PCI-X slot.
 

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Is this another "I read the rumour and expected it to be true" thing? The current lineup of G5's are pretty damn fast even compared to what Intel is offering.

You should probably stop reading the rumour sites because obviously you can't discern the difference between a rumour and a press release :confused:
 

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Reality is that the 1.6, 1.8 and 2 ghz die comes off of the same wafer. Given the simutanious release of all three processers it is highly unlikely that IBM is utilising 3 differents fabricating processes.
Chips are tested to specific standards and speeds. Meaning the 1.6 needs to meet a lower testing standard than the 1.8 or the 2 and so on. Some chips from a specific portion of the wafer may only test to 1.6. IBM will no exactly which wafer locations test to what speed after prototype production. Often. all chips on a wafer will test to the highest standard, but for marketing purposes are put into different configurations on the actual motherboard.
Contrary to popular belief, once a process is stable, speed bumps can only come through more advanced testing or a change in process.
That Said, a major speed bump won't be realised until the new process (.9 nanometer) finds its way into Apples production. That won't happen until Apple exhausts the 1.3 nanometer chips IBM or Apple are sitting on.
The .9 chips are ready to go so it won't be long.
 

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That Said, a major speed bump won't be realised until the new process (.9 nanometer) finds its way into Apples production. That won't happen until Apple exhausts the 1.3 nanometer chips IBM or Apple are sitting on.
The .9 chips are ready to go so it won't be long.
The new 90 nanometer chips are already in the G5 X-serves according to Apple's literature on the G5 X-serves.
 

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Apple must be sitting on some PowerMacs. I've heard some resellers in the States have them on sale. A definate sign!
 

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Yes, my guess is Apple is clearing out the channels of the current inventory this week and maybe the next week or two.
 
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