Canadian Mac Forums at ehMac banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,427 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A customer would like us to set up an ftp site to make it easier for them to send us files ( we are a commercial print shop) Just wondering if anyone here knows of a good free, or relatively inexpensive ftp program that works fine with mac and pc. I know very little about ftp so info about it would be appreciated as well.

thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,069 Posts
If you have a box with Mac OS X, there is the FTP server preinstalled, and there are tools out there to configure it. I know I have my FTP server enabled on My mac so I can transfer files from anywhere if need be. Though the server isn't configured properly as you can't restrict where a user goes.

Also, just yesterday I was looking for an FTP server program for the PC, and well needless to say, I couldn't get any of them to work, most were geared towards not hosting the server, but for server admin tasks.

For the Mac, there are also several programs that allow you to host a server in OS 9 and X, and in X, there are also all the UNIX FTP server applications.

Some apps I have found:
TFTP Server (allows you customize the built-in OS X FTP server)
A complete FTP package that is hosted off the UNIX kernel in OS X.


For OS 9:
Anonymous FTP I've tried it, and its good for one user logging in, but it seemed a little buggy when I tried it about 6 months back.

For both OS X/9:
Rumpus, costs money but is said to be an absolutely awesome FTP Server that will run in both OSes, along with many customizable actions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
I'm not sure if this is getting to messy, but...
You should really consider webDAV ( the thing iDisk is based on). If you want some help setting this up you
can contact me offline.

From http://www.webdav.org/other/faq.html

Why should I use DAV instead of FTP?

Since DAV works over HTTP, you get all the benefits of HTTP that FTP cannot provide. For example: strong authentication, encryption, proxy support, and caching. It is true that you can get some of this through SSH, but the HTTP infrastructure is much more widely deployed than SSH. Further, SSH does not have the wide complement of tools, development libraries, and applications that HTTP does.

DAV transfers (well, HTTP transfers) are also more efficient than FTP. You can pipeline multiple transfers through a single TCP connection, whereas FTP requires a new connection for each file transferred (plus the control connection).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,465 Posts
If you have a box with Mac OS X, there is the FTP server preinstalled, and there are tools out there to configure it. I know I have my FTP server enabled on My mac so I can transfer files from anywhere if need be. Though the server isn't configured properly as you can't restrict where a user goes.

Also, just yesterday I was looking for an FTP server program for the PC, and well needless to say, I couldn't get any of them to work, most were geared towards not hosting the server, but for server admin tasks.
OS X - If you're worried about security in this situation (and who wouldn't be?) why not just create a very restricted account for this single purpose? Boot into it before you leave home - a malicious user might be able to do a bit of petty damage, but it would be restricted to the single account.

Another very easy and secure way to transfer files is the iDisk feature of .Mac. You can access someone's Public folder from an OS 9 or OS X Mac, or from a Windows box by mapping a drive letter or using the Windows XP iDisk utility.

Windows: there's a perfectly good FTP server built into Windows 2000 Pro, although it's not installed by default. Just use the Add Software control panel and have your install CD handy. (Probably the same in XP Pro, but I'm just guessing.)

Cheers :-. Bill
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,427 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
where is the built in ftp on OSX chealion?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,069 Posts
wonderings - Open up System Preferences, click on the Sharing Preference Pane, check through the tabs and look for a button to start the FTP server (or just check the boxes beside anything that says FTP in the Services and Firewall tabs. Tada, FTP server is turned on. But from there you can't do much modification.

Gerbill - I know you can make another account, but the problem I was alluding to is that the user can go anywhere on the hard drive (except other user directories) and delete files so long as permissions allow it (and its most likely they do). Also, I have XP Pro on my Mom's computer, and I didn't know anything about an FTP server, I'll have to look into that, as its really fun to transfer files from one computer to another at a nice speed of 11 MB/s.

And as for the WebDAV, suggestion, I never thought of it, but yes that will work very nicely, although it may be more to your benefit to set up a server to host your WebDAV files instead of depending on .Mac. I don't know how to do this, but it is possible.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,465 Posts
Gerbill - I know you can make another account, but the problem I was alluding to is that the user can go anywhere on the hard drive (except other user directories) and delete files so long as permissions allow it (and its most likely they do). Also, I have XP Pro on my Mom's computer, and I didn't know anything about an FTP server, I'll have to look into that, as its really fun to transfer files from one computer to another at a nice speed of 11 MB/s.
You should really explore the functionality of OS X user accounts. You can easily make an account that's locked up tight as a drum, even for a user accessing your Mac locally. Want to restrict a user to using Safari to browse the Web and NOTHING ELSE? Piece of cake. On a Unix box, you can only do what the permissions pertaining to the particular account you are signed into allow you to. Try it - make up a restricted account, log into it, and see what you can do, outside of the parameters you set. You'll find that it's "nada."

Assuming XP Pro has the same functionality as 2000 Pro in this regard, you need to open the Add Software control panel, choose Add Windows Software from the left hand pane, and look at the Internet stuff-there are some dependencies that require you to install other stuff besides the FTP server. If you're an old hand at configuring Windows, it shouldn't take more than an hour to get up and running with your FTP server :->


Cheers :-> Bill
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,069 Posts
Gerbill - Thanks. I think I shall have to explore the Accounts Preference Pane more thoroughly, I've never gone to the depth you've suggested. But it still doesn't limit a user from changing directories and browsing around. The usual idea is to have such a user only access a folder and only that folder.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,465 Posts
Gerbill - Thanks. I think I shall have to explore the Accounts Preference Pane more thoroughly, I've never gone to the depth you've suggested. But it still doesn't limit a user from changing directories and browsing around. The usual idea is to have such a user only access a folder and only that folder.
Sorry to belabour the point, but you CAN set up a user account in such a way that it limits precisely that. For example, suppose that I want a young and irresponsible family member to be able to log onto my G4 and run a couple of video games and nothing else whatsoever. To do this, I create a new account (the Accounts pane in System prefs). Give it a name and a password. Then, select the new account and click the Capabilities button. Click Simple Finder and specify that this account is only allowed to run Cro-Mag Rally and Bugdom. I Log out of my admin account and into the new one. I see a very small dock with an Applications folder containing aliases of the two games. There is also a Documents folder and a Shared folder I have already emptyied out as a precaution. The Apple menu contains only two items - Sleep and Log Out.

Now, I defy you to do anything when logged into this account except play those two games. You have absolutely no access to your own files, let alone anyone else's, except for the Documents folder in the Dock.

Try it, you'll likely find it useful at some point.

Cheers :-> Bill
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,069 Posts
What about using that account to log in through ftp? I know that works for the actual computer, but when you use the terminal (by logging in through SSH) or an FTP client, does the same thing apply? Or is that I'm just a little thick on this subject?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,465 Posts
What about using that account to log in through ftp? I know that works for the actual computer, but when you use the terminal (by logging in through SSH) or an FTP client, does the same thing apply? Or is that I'm just a little thick on this subject?
Beats me. I never tried it. My point is that you have very fine control over what a non-admin user is or is not allowed to do. Unix was built as a multi-user OS, and OS X has that heritage. I only have access to one computer at the moment, so I can't experiment.

Cheers :-> Bill
 

·
Lifetime membership
Joined
·
9,265 Posts
Is it an FTP client you want?
Or FTP hosting software?

You can setup your own hosting on your computer, But
I'd check to see with your provider if it's okay first.

If it's client software you want for the file transfers...Then
here's a few that I'd recomend.

These aren't freeware...But they are good Shareware,
I'm not sure what a Window's equivalent would be though.

Fetch 4.0.3
OS 7 or higher
Or
OSX 10. or higher:

http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/1126

http://fetchsoftworks.com/

TransmitX 2.5.1
OSX 10.1 or higher:

http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/16683

Dave :cool:

[ September 12, 2003, 08:01 PM: Message edited by: dolawren ]
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top