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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi: I have a 2012 MacBook Pro with 16 gigs of RAM and a brand new 2 TB HD. I inadvertently did not turn off 'FieVault' when I installed the new drive. It has been in the encryption stage now for 2 days with no end in sight. Is there a way to stop this process? It says I have another day to wait, but it has been saying 1 day left in the process for the last 2 days. I have left it sitting plugged in and running since it began, in hopes of speeding up the process.
 

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What OS are you on?

Encrypting a 2TB drive will take a very long time, as HDDs are extremely slow for that kind of work. It's also possible the process is just stuck. If you restart the computer, it should clear up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you! I am on El Capitan. It is now saying '22 hours left' so I suppose it is doing its thing! Thanks!
 

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Thank you! I am on El Capitan. It is now saying '22 hours left' so I suppose it is doing its thing! Thanks!
I wouldn't be surprised if it went from 22 hours to 2 at some random point. It would take a very long time to encrypt large files, and the estimate is based on current progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you. It looks as though you are indeed correct, this AM it indicates that there are only 9 hours to go! Now, when complete, will I be able to turn this firevault application off?
 

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Thank you. It looks as though you are indeed correct, this AM it indicates that there are only 9 hours to go! Now, when complete, will I be able to turn this firevault application off?
yes, you can turn it off as well.. but i believe it may run through the same process again.
i never use it as it causes more harm than benefit.
 

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yes, you can turn it off as well.. but i believe it may run through the same process again.
i never use it as it causes more harm than benefit.
The only time one should even consider using FileVault is when:
Preventing others from accessing your data is more important, than being able to access that data yourself.
 

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I had a friend who asked me to update her MBP. She had Fire Vault turned on. Took me 24 hours to decode the damn thing so I could back it up in a reasonable time with only 130GB of data. Anyone who thinks they need that much security has some serious issues. Apple ought to scrap that ability altogether for 99.9% of users and make it a downloadable only option.
 

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From the Mac Help regarding FileVault.

WARNING: Don’t forget your recovery key. If you turn on FileVault and then forget your login password and can’t reset it, and you also forget your recovery key, you won’t be able to log in and your files and settings will be lost forever.

FileVault encryption can’t be used with some highly partitioned disk configurations, such as RAID disk sets.

Important: After you turn on FileVault and the encryption begins, you can’t turn off FileVault until the initial encryption is complete. Encryption can take a long time, depending on the amount of data stored on your computer, but you can continue to use your computer as you normally do. Once the encryption process is complete, you can turn off FileVault.
 

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The only time one should even consider using FileVault is when:
Preventing others from accessing your data is more important, than being able to access that data yourself.
This makes no sense. Unless you're prone to forgetting the password you need to enter every single time you boot up or wake from sleep, no one is locking themselves out.

..."Anyone who thinks they need that much security has some serious issues. Apple ought to scrap that ability altogether for 99.9% of users and make it a downloadable only option."

A lot of bad misinformation about FV going on here. Considering every single web site I have login credentials with is auto-filled and auto-saved, not to mention huge amounts of personal data, banking data and a host of other private data is on my MBP; if I were to lose it, or it gets stolen, it's nice to know you aren't ever getting into my drive or my data without the password.

Any non-FV protected Mac can have its data stolen in literally minutes no matter how complex your user password is -- because the password is irrelevant without FV enabled.

It has little to do with "serious security" as much as it has to do with protecting yourself and your identity from theft.
 

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Now, when complete, will I be able to turn this firevault application off?

Yes, but as mentioned, guess how long it's going to take to un-encrypt the drive. :D

Which makes one ask why it was turned on in the fist place if you didn't fall into Apples trap of enabling it as a almost hidden option!!!

Completely unnecessary for an average Mac user, but also depends what info one has stored on their Mac.
 

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file vault - corrupts files each time it vaults and unvaults.
speaking by experience. - all i can say is unless you are a field agent for the CIA or FBI - really dont need or use it.. it is more harmful than good.
 

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This makes no sense. Unless you're prone to forgetting the password you need to enter every single time you boot up or wake from sleep, no one is locking themselves out.

..."Anyone who thinks they need that much security has some serious issues. Apple ought to scrap that ability altogether for 99.9% of users and make it a downloadable only option."

A lot of bad misinformation about FV going on here. Considering every single web site I have login credentials with is auto-filled and auto-saved, not to mention huge amounts of personal data, banking data and a host of other private data is on my MBP; if I were to lose it, or it gets stolen, it's nice to know you aren't ever getting into my drive or my data without the password.

Any non-FV protected Mac can have its data stolen in literally minutes no matter how complex your user password is -- because the password is irrelevant without FV enabled.

It has little to do with "serious security" as much as it has to do with protecting yourself and your identity from theft.
Critical data can easily be stored and encrypted on a read write encrypted disk image. Moreover the insanity of encrypting everything to protect a handful of critical files is mind boggling. My first encounter with File Vault was back in Panther Days when I had to inform someone who had lost track of their password (possibly it was corrupt) that without that password their data was toast.

Adding a second password does protect against password corruption but someone who loses track of a password they use every day is even more likely to lose the back-up password they never use.
 

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Moreover the insanity of encrypting everything to protect a handful of critical files is mind boggling.

An excellent summary understatement I must say!!!

PS: We keep virtually not much more personal info or data on our home used Macs or iDevices than anyone could find in some 'phone directory lookup or search.
 

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Things like banking statements and household budget stuff is kept locked down. That and an ever growing list of passwords.

Of course if you maintain a large collection of incriminating eMails, like Podesta or Anthony Wiener, then you would probably consider FileVault safer than the risk of having the FBI seize your computer and leaking your eMails to Congress and the rest of the world.
 

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