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Beaugeste
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1,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a warning, and wondering if anyone else has had this happen..

Last night after closing my browser, a window appeared on my screen, saying Bell was doing a short survey of it's services and would I be interested in filling it out.
I know Bell is concerned about losing customers who are going wireless or" cutting the cable" and they call me every few months asking if I'm happy with their service, so I clicked OK.
The questions were few and basic, then, as a reward, I was offered the choice of some gifts. Rubbish stuff but suspiciously also an iPod, of which they were out of stock.
At the bottom, raving comments from satisfied respondents who had received the gifts.
@#$#[email protected]%!!
I closed the window and at that hour could contact Bell but this morning they confirmed that they have had a number of complaints about these fake surveys.

I'm guessing the damage would have been done if I had clicked further for the gifts, or maybe given information. So far, no sign that I opened myself up to potential harm by filing in the survey...
 

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Premium Member
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42,496 Posts
Anyone can tell which service provider you're using for Internet services. I always get fake surveys from Rogers. I imagine no great harm is done unless you pay for the shipping required to receive these great gifts.
 

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Premium Member
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17,783 Posts
As a matter of policy I close out any surveys, even/especially if it requires a force quit of the browser.

Should mention a telephone corollary. Have heard that some telephone scammers will ask an innocent question, easily answered with a yes or a no. Try to avoid the simple answer, especially a yes, can be manipulated to make it appear you agreed to purchase a product or service.

I usually reply with the question: "Who's calling?"
 

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Premium Member
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42,496 Posts
It's just a popup window.
 

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Premium Member
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1,524 Posts
Well, even just a popup window needs a source and with some data and instructions to actually work and display.
Whatever sites you were visiting sold that popup as an ad. The site provided your IP (and ISP data) to them.
 
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