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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Newish computer running el Capitan. Something I have done since the first version of Jaguar is maintain a small rtf file at root level. Essentially I just record any software or updates and the date installed. Occasionally useful when something creates an issue. Almost always iTunes or Adobe.

Anyways in el Capitan I cannot just write an addition to that file. I have to create a duplicate, write the changes, delete the original then move the duplicate to the root level. The last 2 steps require giving entering admin password, making for an additional 5 steps for what should be a very easy task.

I keep it root level for easy reading when booted from a different volume or if just using another user profile.

Any way to avoid the OS X 2-step and still keep this file at root level? The usual tricks don't work.
 

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The root directory is read-only locked for a few reasons - primarily to prevent malware installation, but also to limit user data to the appropriate folders. If you need to share a file between users it, should be stored in /Users/Shared.

You could force the permissions to be different on your file, but they would be reset in OS updates (and possibly restarts, not sure on that one). Either way, best practice is to not store anything in the root dir.
 

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Newish computer running el Capitan. Something I have done since the first version of Jaguar is maintain a small rtf file at root level. Essentially I just record any software or updates and the date installed. Occasionally useful when something creates an issue. Almost always iTunes or Adobe.

Anyways in el Capitan I cannot just write an addition to that file. I have to create a duplicate, write the changes, delete the original then move the duplicate to the root level. The last 2 steps require giving entering admin password, making for an additional 5 steps for what should be a very easy task.

I keep it root level for easy reading when booted from a different volume or if just using another user profile.

Any way to avoid the OS X 2-step and still keep this file at root level? The usual tricks don't work.
It's possible the routine maintenance scripts are setting the permissions of that file appropriately (for a file that is in root.) You might have more luck putting the file anywhere else but root, and then creating an alias or symlink to the file in root.

From terminal, it would be something like:

cd /; sudo ln -s ~/{the filename}

You'll be prompted for your password and then that should be the end of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's possible the routine maintenance scripts are setting the permissions of that file appropriately (for a file that is in root.) You might have more luck putting the file anywhere else but root, and then creating an alias or symlink to the file in root.

From terminal, it would be something like:

cd /; sudo ln -s ~/{the filename}

You'll be prompted for your password and then that should be the end of it.
Will have to test that one to make sure the link works within a disk image. This file is most important when examining an older disk image of the OS. Used to determine if the disk image was created before or after I installed an update or app which I suspect may be causing problems. I've only had to do a serious back track on two occasions, but I was very glad I had that reference when the occasion demanded it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Did a successful test of a file and alias link within a folder using a disc image created for the purpose. Thanks for the suggestion. Will do a full blown ASR disc image test as part of the next back-up

FWIW Found creating a disc image from a folder via Disc Utility somewhat less than intuitive. Disc image ended up within the folder I was imaging.:eek: Obviously much easier if using Super Duper to create an ASR disc image of the normal boot volume.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Stands for Apple System (or Software) Restore. An asr disk image is a disk image of the boot volume. Takes a while to build, but restoring the boot volume from a disk image can take as little as 5 minutes. Also nice in that you do not lose the previous system back-up every time you create a new one. Both Super Duper and CCC can create asr disk images instead of clones. If you are really patient you can create compressed disk images. I am not that patient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Found a good work around today. Put the .rtf file within a root level directory which I named notes. Now behaves as desired.
 

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Found a good work around today. Put the .rtf file within a root level directory which I named notes. Now behaves as desired.

Nice discovery, thanks.

I might get around to actually using El Cap'n one day with it's "new improvements and features"!! Yeah right. An excessive multi click Mac OS it seems.
 

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Anyways in el Capitan I cannot just write an addition to that file. I have to create a duplicate, write the changes, delete the original then move the duplicate to the root level. The last 2 steps require giving entering admin password, making for an additional 5 steps for what should be a very easy task.

eMacMan, I just tried doing this with El Cap'n on my old MBPro and adding additional comments to a TextEdit file on my Desktop and didn't have any such extra steps to do nor did I need to keep the file in the Root directory.

I just open the existing file, add a comment and save and close the file. Works just like it always has for me. I usually use command+s, then command+w, or click the red close button + click save button (or just hit the return key). Nice and simple.

I haven't tried using either of my Pages versions that used to have a stupid save duplicate mess. I hope things have improved for that confusing and stupid save method.





- Patrick
======
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
eMacMan, I just tried doing this with El Cap'n on my old MBPro and adding additional comments to a TextEdit file on my Desktop and didn't have any such extra steps to do nor did I need to keep the file in the Root directory.
There was never an issue with files on the desktop. It was when I saved to the root level of the volume. The reason for saving at root is this rtf file shows when updates and software were installed, when utilities were run, backups done....

Used exclusively for trouble shooting so having it filed on the Desktop or in the documents folder can make it hard to access if I am booted from a secondary volume.

The root location makes life much easier on the rare occasions I do need to trouble shoot. Thankfully the sub-directory solved the problem.
 

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There was never an issue with files on the desktop.

Sorry, I misunderstood your situation it seems.


The root location makes life much easier on the rare occasions I do need to trouble shoot.

I'll sure agree with that, and not always "rare occasions" as far as I'm concerned. ;)
 
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