ehMac banner

1 - 20 of 283 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I poked around for an appropriate place to post this video, and finding none, decided a new thread could be useful to contain all Earth-Moon and nearby space related stuff.

Yesterday SpaceX successfully launched their Dragon capsule on another resupply mission to the ISS (the livestreaming of the launch was very well done - lots of live cameras from the booster and 2nd stage, to the point where you could see the Dragon capsule separate and deploy her solar array).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_s_ZxVsCvQ

While that was happening, SpaceX also made it's second attempt to do a controlled landing of the Falcon stage 1 onto an unmanned floating platform offshore.

Oh. So. Close!

+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,373 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42,287 Posts
I think we're getting into that Wild, Wild West of Outer Space shortly with tones of private interests heading out. Waiting for the Google Mars Mission...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,393 Posts
Thanks to your earlier post and NSA link yesterday CM, and it's bookmarked!!, I was able to watch the launch live. But missed the recovery footage that has to be like finding a marble or postage stamp in the middle of the Canadian hayfields to land on. Quite amazing and still an accomplishment deserving a lot of praise.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42,287 Posts
Agreed, pm-r, I really appreciate your space updates, CubaMark.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #7

A Canadian company best known for building tiny objects suitable for outer space has just earned a US patent on something distinctly grander: a 12-mile-high inflatable space elevator held up not by cables but by pressurized segments, reports fastcoexist.com. That's more than 20 times taller than the world’s current tallest building, the nearly 3,000-foot-tall Burj Khalifa tower in Dubai. So why a space elevator? Because rockets (and, presumably, the space tourists inside them) require less force to launch when starting that much closer to the destination. "Landing at 12 miles above sea level will make space flight more like taking a passenger jet," says Thoth Technology CEO Caroline Roberts in a press release.

The inventor says astronauts would reach the top via electrical elevator, from where rockets can launch in a single stage to orbit as well as return to refuel. If this seems far-fetched, it's actually less ambitious than Obayashi Corporation's hope to build a space elevator a quarter of the way to the moon by 2050, reports CNET. Even so, Thoth's ambition still requires building just beyond what is known as the "Armstrong Limit," or "the point at which atmospheric pressure is so low that your bodily fluids would boil off without a protective suit," reports Global Construction Review. The idea is gaining so much traction that Seattle is actually hosting a Space Elevator Conference later this month. (Obayashi plans to construct its space elevator not from Earth but from, well, space.)​

(CNet via Newser)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Those of you with an interest in spaceflight may find this interesting.



On November 13, 2015, something is going to smack into the Ocean *really close* to Sri Lanka.

Most likely, it's a spent third-stage booster that someone on earth sent up there....

No, it's not Snoopy!

Here's a good read: WT1190F FAQs

And more from Universe Today

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'm surprised this isn't bigger news. NASA has eliminated Boeing and Lockheed-Martin —two industry heavyweights— from the competition for a contract to supply ISS cargo run services, leaving three relative newcomers in the running:


NASA Cuts Boeing From Competition To Deliver International Space Station Cargo

Boeing Company is one of the five companies initially competing for the CRS-2. Boeing's submission included the use of its modified CST-100 Starliner unmanned spacecraft to transport NASA astronauts back and forth the ISS. The news came as another blow to Boeing who also lost in the Pentagon's Long Range Strike Bomber competition, which is believed to be an $80 billion contract.

"We received a letter from NASA and are out of CRS-2. I don't think we'll know the 'why' until our debrief with NASA," wrote Boeing spokeswoman Kelly Kaplan in an email statement.

Industry rumors have been circulating that the submission from Lockheed Martin Space Systems was quietly eliminated. This leaves three companies – Sierra Nevada Corporation, SpaceX and Orbital ATK – in the running for the two remaining contracts that will complete the U.S. spacecraft which will resupply the ISS from 2018 to 2024. Orbital and SpaceX won the original CRS contracts in 2008.​

(TechTimes)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,393 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
China wants to share its new space station with the world



China is launching a rival to the International Space Station (ISS) – and it wants to share its new toy.

The China Manned Space Agency and the UN Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) have announced a partnership that will let UN member states conduct experiments on and even send astronauts to the Chinese space station, due to start operating in the 2020s.

The UN and China say they are keen to get more nations involved in space activities. “This is an exciting opportunity to further build the space capacity of developing countries and increase understanding of the benefits space can bring to humankind,” said UNOOSA director Simonetta Di Pippo.

China is excluded from the ISS because of a US government ban on its participation. It’s not clear if the other ISS partners – Russia, Japan, Canada and the member countries of the European Space Agency – will have access to China’s station.

Later this year China will launch space lab Tiangong-2 to practise the skills needed to build the station.​

(New Scientist)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42,287 Posts
It's fairly easy to make a generous offer for a station that hasn't been built or launched yet!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
It's fairly easy to make a generous offer for a station that hasn't been built or launched yet!
Well.... actually....

The Tiangong project has been underway for some time now, with Tiangong 1, the first test module still in orbit despite having been scheduled for de-orbit in 2013.

The recent announcement that China is looking for partners (since they're banned from ISS partnerships) is a step toward cooperation and shared costs that will enable them to move fairly quickly.

At least the Chinese can get themselves into orbit, unlike some other folks we could mention.... :lmao:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,326 Posts
Space travel will shortly become the purview of nations not responsible to an electorate. Kinda like hosting the Olympics has become.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42,287 Posts
Space travel will shortly become the purview of nations not responsible to an electorate. Kinda like hosting the Olympics has become.
Or companies. I'm counting on the Google manned mission to Mars.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
New NASA network poised to bring internet to entire solar system



NASA has made significant progress toward establishing a more reliable, and potentially solar-system-spanning communication system with the installation of a new breed of data network aboard the International Space Station (ISS). As its name suggests, the Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) service allows for the storage of partial pieces of information in the nodes along a communication path, which will allow for faster and more stable transmissions.

The system has been integrated with the ISS's Telescience Resource Kit and represents over 10 years of work from NASA and its partners as part of the agency's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. AES seeks to develop technologies that could be instrumental in the future exploration of our solar system.

The more traditional internet protocol system previously used by astronauts aboard the station required each node of a network to be available at the same time in order for data to be transferred. For astronauts communicating from the ISS, these nodes are often satellites, which can be unavailable for any number of reasons, leading to significant disruptions in communications.

The DTN's ability to store and send partial bundles of information as and when a node becomes available has the potential to significantly reduce communication latency, allowing for a greater level of data availability and superior bandwidth utilization​

(Gizmag)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,945 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
The Dutch Are Going To The Moon With The Chinese

One of the defining characteristics of the New Space era is partnerships. Whether it is between the private and public sector, different space agencies, or different institutions across the world, collaboration has become the cornerstone to success. Consider the recent agreement between the Netherlands Space Office (NSO) and the Chinese National Space Agency (CNSA) that was announced earlier this week.

In an agreement made possible by the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed in 2015 between the Netherlands and China, a Dutch-built radio antenna will travel to the Moon aboard the Chinese Chang’e 4 satellite, which is scheduled to launch in 2018. Once the lunar exploration mission reaches the Moon, it will deposit the radio antenna on the far side, where it will begin to provide scientists with fascinating new views of the Universe.

The radio antenna itself is also the result of collaboration, between scientists from Radboud University, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON) and the small satellite company Innovative Solutions in Space (ISIS). After years of research and development, these three organizations have produced an instrument which they hope will usher in a new era of radio astronomy.

* * *​

very little is known about this part of the electromagnetic spectrum. As a result, the Dutch radio antenna could be the first to provide information on the development of the earliest structures in the Universe. It is also the first instrument to be sent into space as part of a Chinese space mission.​

(Universe Today)
 
1 - 20 of 283 Posts
Top