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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I have an early 2008 15-inch MacBook Pro that I dug out of my closet and replaced the screen.
The screen on the original one was damaged physically by a candle sitting behind the laptop - it wan't noticed until it ruined the screen.

So...
That MNp was running 10.6.8 when the screen was damaged.
Replaced the screen and everything seemed fine
Put it away for a few months, just dug it out again and...
1. When I booted up on the internal original 200 GB hard drive, I get to the Apple logo, the spinning wheel for a while and then the spinning wheel stops and it just sits there
2. Tried booting in recovery mode - same thing
3. Tried booting in safe mode - same thing
4. Got a FW back-up drive which had 4 back ups on it - all show up when I start with the option key
5. Tried booting with one of the back ups and end up with a weird flashing screen, mostly black and white
6. Tried booting up with a different back up on the FW external and the MBp boots all the way.
The back up the MBp booted with was 10.11.5. Seem to run OK with it.
Ran Disk Utility on the internal HD and the four back ups on the external FW drive - they all checked OK.
However the MBp seems to run quite hot - CPU temp went up to 91 degrees and then settled at 86 degrees.
Both fans are running at about 2000 rpm

7. Shut down the MBp and tried booting it up on the internal HD. Booted up fine this time, so maybe disk utility fixed something.
But when on 10.6.8 I get the occasional flicker on the screen.
Went to the dashboard to check the CPU temperature - sitting at 86 degrees.
Then could not go from dashboard back to desktop by hitting the escape key - looks like the keyboard was locked up. Mouse cursor still worked fine, but clicking with the mouse did not. Had to shut down via the power button.
Then MBp won't start until it cools off a bit.

Two questions....
1. Is 91 or 86 degree CPU temperature OK for that model? The bottom of the case gets hotter than I would like. The MBp is sitting on a glass and wood table
2. I thought there was an Apple hardware test on could run, but where do I find that?
 

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Two questions....
1. Is 91 or 86 degree CPU temperature OK for that model? The bottom of the case gets hotter than I would like. The MBp is sitting on a glass and wood table
2. I thought there was an Apple hardware test on could run, but where do I find that?

What are you using for temperature sensing and I assume it is set to show degrees in Celsius???

80 C – 90C is not overly hot according to Apple and many of their laptop models run hot, especially on the bottom.

Using "Macs Fan Control.app" you could boost the fan speed if you like. I have used it with all our Macs as I feel Apple's temp settings are much too high. Our iMac's run in the 50C ±10C range.

As for running the Apple hardware test, the method will be depend on what OS X version you are using and the name also changes to Apple Diagnostic Test or some such name. You will need to Google the method for what you have or running.

Or just use these:
How to use Apple Hardware Test on your Mac
https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201257
and/or
How to use Apple Diagnostics on your Mac
https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT202731





- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm using istat pro to check the temperature....and my hand:)
And yes it's in degrees C

Just looked at the CPU temp on my Mini - it sits at 49 degrees C

Right now the Mac won't even start - once it cools down enough I'm pretty sure it will.
I can then run the H/W test and maybe boost the fan speed to see if that helps.

Considering this MacBook pro is 10 years old, not much point spending any money on it.
 

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Considering this MacBook pro is 10 years old, not much point spending any money on it.

Well, at least it's a year younger than my 2007 15 inch MacBook Pro that still gets used occasionally and suits my usage just fine.

Sort of like my old Samsung flip cell phone. ;-) :D





- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Patrick -

So much for trying out the hardware test and fan controls you suggested.
Haven't been able to restar the MacBook pro

The light on the front edge comes on - if I have an external FW drive plugged in, it gets power - but otherwise nothing.

Then I read on line that the 2008 model which I have will not boot up unless one has the 85 watt power supply connected.
I don't really buy that since the MacBook pro will obviously just run on the battery alone - but the power supply I used was a 60 watt one.
Battery is fully charged based on the battery lights, all 5 come on.

Then I tried the "10 second fix":
I found a way to always make it boot.
- Unplug the battery.
- Unplug the magsafe power cable.
- Hold down the powerbutton for about 10 sec and continue to do that.
- While still holding the powerbutton down, insert the magsafe power cable and hold it for another 10 sec.
- Release the powerbutton after those 10 sec and make a "normal" press as if you would normally
turn on your computer.

If that doesn't work then try to remove one RAM memory and switch places and do the method that I told you.
Doing that I can now hear the fans spin but still nothing else.

Unless somebody has some other words of wisdom, I'm going to get an 85 watt power supply - charge up the battery using that (maybe the battery voltage needs to be just a bit higher which is perhaps what the 85 watt supply will give me) and try again.
 

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Doing that I can now hear the fans spin but still nothing else.

Unless somebody has some other words of wisdom, I'm going to get an 85 watt power supply - charge up the battery using that (maybe the battery voltage needs to be just a bit higher which is perhaps what the 85 watt supply will give me) and try again.

That "10 second fix" you tried is actually officially know as an SMC Reset

Neither of those two pieces of software would contain anything to prevent your MacBook Pro from booting. That Mac has got some serious hardware problems and may not even be worth considering spending any more time trying to fix it.

But I may be misunderstanding something, but I seem to be getting mixed messages as to whether it's actually booting up and running properly or not, and that seems to be dependent on the OS X version being used.





- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That "10 second fix" you tried is actually officially know as an SMC Reset

Neither of those two pieces of software would contain anything to prevent your MacBook Pro from booting. That Mac has got some serious hardware problems and may not even be worth considering spending any more time trying to fix it.

But I may be misunderstanding something, but I seem to be getting mixed messages as to whether it's actually booting up and running properly or not, and that seems to be dependent on the OS X version being used.

- Patrick
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I thought there was a hardware problem as well (and maybe there is), but a few days ago it started fine on the 10.11 FW backup, I then ran disk utility on 10.6.8 on the internal drive and after that it also started on the internal which it didn't start on before - stopped part way through the boot up.

So yes, it's confusing - this Mac goes from booting partially on the internal drive (10.6.8) to booting completely on an extaernal back-up (10.11.5) to now not starting at all.

SMC reset for that MBp model as described by Apple is a bit simpler than the "10 second solution"

Shut down your Mac.
Remove the battery.
Press and hold the power button for 5 seconds.
Reinstall the battery.
Press the power button again to turn on your Mac.
It's not really clear if the power adapter should be plugged in during that procedure or not.
In the description I posted, plugging in the power adapter while holding down the power button was part of the procedure - nothing like that with the Apple procedure that I just quoted.

BTW - Is there a "button battery" in those 2008 MacBook pros?
I have to check that.
 

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BTW - Is there a "button battery" in those 2008 MacBook pros?
I have to check that.

If it's a Late 2008 MBPro model = YES
https://www.thebookyard.com/product.php?cPath=39_118_149&products_id=15890

I was going to mention there's a way to test it using the Date&Time pref pane, and removing all power source for a few minutes or so with the Auto set time disabled, but the Mac has to be able to boot to perform that.

It's not really clear if the power adapter should be plugged in during that procedure or not.
The main idea is to remove ALL power sources to allow ALL circuits and capacitors to drain. So I would say no power supply should be connected.





- Patrick
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The MBp is an early 2008 (post 1), the model is A1260

And it also has a PRAM battery
https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/MacBoo...+A1226+and+A1260+PRAM+Battery+Replacement/671

But to replace it one has to really dig back into the Mac - Apple sure doesn't make that easy.
I suppose they didn't expect too many people still wanted to use a 10 year old laptop.


To save all that work and cost, use the "test date" without any power available with the "auto set date" disabled, and if the date and time survives after being left without ANY power (battery included) for several minutes, then the PRAM battery is still good and functioning properly.



- Patrick
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