Canadian Mac Forums at ehMac banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,798 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Mac Guru
Joined
·
14,627 Posts
I'm not sure how it offends Muslims. Isn't it Jews that were prosecuted, along with those sporting the incorrect eye and hair color?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Lars, it is because SOME Muslims were brainwashed (a tool employed by ALL organized religions, IMHO) at an early age into believing that the Holocaust did not really happen, or at least it wasn't anywhere near as horrific as it truly was. Therefore, it would "offend" select Muslims who believe so.

Which is nonsense, of course.

I am a lifetime devout atheist (I guess my parents brainwashed me that way - thankfully!) and although I am often amused and entertained by creationist theories, intelligent design, the great spaghetti monster, et al...I am never offended. So I don't get why these select Muslims would be offended by other opinions that may contradict theirs. That's just silly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I'm offended by them not teaching the holocaust.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
They should teach about the holocaust, but the wording in this article makes it difficult to tell how big the problem is.

It found some teachers are reluctant to cover the atrocity for fear of upsetting students whose beliefs include Holocaust denial.
It found some teachers are dropping courses covering the Holocaust at the earliest opportunity over fears Muslim pupils might express anti-Semitic and anti-Israel reactions in class.
It mentions one secondary school and "another department" where this has occurred. Why not give us statistics showing the percentage of schools that are failing to teach this.

If it is just some teachers in a couple of schools then I think they need to address this situation with them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,709 Posts
I'm offended by stories that teach people that problems are larger than they are, even if those are serious and important problems.

I expect this particular story to show up on snopes soon. Oh, wait, it's already there:

Urban Legends Reference Pages: Holocaust Teaching Ban in the UK
www.snopes.com said:

Status:
Multiple: All schools in the UK have stopped teaching about the Holocaust in their history classes: False.

One history department in a northern UK city stopped teaching about the Holocaust because it wished to avoid confronting anti-Semitic sentiment and Holocaust denial among some Muslim pupils: True.

Origins: This piece began circulating in e-mail in mid-April 2007. Its central claim, that schools in Britain no longer teach about The Holocaust for fear of offending Muslim students, isn't on the money: Even news articles that bear titles such as "Britain Schools Ignore the Holocaust" and "Schools Drop Holocaust Lessons" point out that only <U>one</U> history department in a northern UK school did that. In all the rest of the country's schools, information about the Holocaust was still being imparted to students.

Those news articles were a response to the <NOBR>March 2007</NOBR> release of the Historical Association's report titled <I>Teaching Emotive and Controversial History 3-19 (overview of its objectives and full report, a study funded by the UK's Department for Education and Skills to examine how educators in Britain were teaching sensitive and/or controversial aspects of history and to highlight what approaches had worked among those that had been tried.

(As for the reasons behind such a study, the report noted: "Teachers and schools avoid emotive and controversial history for a variety of reasons, some of which are well-intentioned. Some feel that certain issues are inappropriate for particular age groups or decide in advance that pupils lack the maturity to grasp them. Where teachers lack confidence in their subject knowledge or subject-specific pedagogy, this can also be a reason for avoiding certain content. Staff may wish to avoid causing offence or appearing insensitive to individuals or groups in their classes. In particular settings, teachers of history are unwilling to challenge highly contentious or charged versions of history in which pupils are steeped at home, in their community or in a place of worship. Some teachers also feel that the issues are best avoided in history, believing them to be taught elsewhere in the curriculum such as in citizenship or religious education.")

This study was an early step in the process of reworking national curriculum, not its final outcome. That is, it was a gathering and presentation of information rather than an assembly of recommendations meant to be implemented.

One history department looked at by the fact-finders was found to have cut information about the Holocaust from its lessons due to worries that Muslim pupils might express anti-Semitic reactions. Said the report: "For example, a history department in a northern city recently avoided selecting the Holocaust as a topic for GCSE coursework for fear of confronting anti-Semitic sentiment and Holocaust denial among some Muslim pupils. In another history department, the Holocaust was taught despite anti-Semitic sentiment among some pupils, but the same department deliberately avoided teaching the Crusades at Key Stage 3 because their balanced treatment of the topic would have directly challenged what was taught in some local mosques.")

There are no plans to stop teaching the Holocaust. Indeed, the education department's plan seems to be ensuring that it is taught everywhere. A spokesman for the Department of Education and Skills (DES) maintained that "The Adjegbo report on citizenship [a different report authored by Sir Keith Adjegbo and released in January 2007] said key British historical events must be taught" and that while "the national curriculum is a broad framework and there is scope for schools to make their own decisions, teaching elements including the Holocaust and key British events will be compulsory."

Currently, according to a DES spokesman, "Teaching of the Holocaust is already compulsory in schools at Key Stage 3 (ages 11 to 14), and it will remain so in the new KS3 curriculum from September 2008." Schools in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland have different guidelines and curriculums; in those parts of the UK, according to the BBC, "Holocaust teaching is not compulsory but schools may teach it if they wish, and this has not changed recently."

The bottom line to all this fuss? Schools in the UK are indeed teaching about the Holocaust, something British journalists seemed to downplay in their rush to report that one department in one city was not. The e-mailed call to arms cited above was likely the result of a misreading of those already badly-presented news articles.
 

·
Canadian By Choice
Joined
·
117,692 Posts
Here is something I wrote for our Faculty's Newsletter, at the request of our Dean. I am the only Jewish person in the Faculty of Education at MUN.



A personal reflection upon the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz

The horror of Auschwitz is a stark challenge to many to try and understand not only how this overt act of genocide could have happened, but how we allow this sort of violence to continue to take place in various parts of our world even today. Let no one think that the Holocaust was a unique event in human history, in that while it exceeded other genocides (e.g., Bosnia, Rwanda, and Sudan) in the numbers of innocent persons murdered, it was not different in the basic intent underlying these crimes against humanity. I think that this is why it is important to take a moment and recall the reality that was Auschwitz to ensure that deep within our own humanity we do not forget the unforgettable. For in remembering, one is forced to integrate these many lives - these trapped souls - into one's consciousness. Auschwitz must become a place that reminds the world of not only “man’s inhumanity to man”, but also the dignity of people that makes each of us responsible for world peace. The philosopher George Santayana is quoted as stating that “The one who does not remember history is bound to live through it again”. To this end, we must all bear witness to what takes place within our world each day of our lives.

It is a custom in the Jewish religion to leave a pebble atop a gravestone when visiting a loved one's resting place. May this short passage serve as a pebble of remembrance for those who died in Auschwitz, as well as for those distant members of my own family who I never knew and who died in Dachau (dachau-39 - photo.net. “Never Again”. Shalom, Paix, Peace.

Dr. Marc Glassman
Professor
Faculty of Education
Memorial University of Newfoundland
 

·
Canadian By Choice
Joined
·
117,692 Posts
Thank you, Treena. I went to Dachau back in 1972, and left a small stone on the monument beneath the "Nie Wieder" (Never Again) sign. This is a Jewish custom to say that "I was here and I remembered". This is why we need to assure ourselves that we do not forget the unforgettable, and we can only do this through education of each generation. Paix, mes amis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,415 Posts
I went to Dachau back in 1972, and left a small stone on the monument beneath the "Nie Wieder" (Never Again) sign.
There are not enough pebbles in all the world to symbolize an appropriate remembrance for the atrocities and unnecessary deaths that have brought us all to this point in history. Nevertheless it is our duty and privilege as human beings to digest the horror of our history and metabolize it into creativity and energy that drives us into the future we can create. Let us all try to create a future with less horror and shame for our children.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
To this day I still can't watch Schindler's List, even the ads for it when it was in the theatres caused me to "choke" on my emotions. As for creating a future with less horror & shame we can only hope, but this century didn't get off to a good start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,798 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As long as people turn a blind eye to injustices, we will always have this problem. Being afraid to confront people also leads to problems. All too often we are afraid to "offend" someone, while they get away with murder (sometimes literally).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,702 Posts
This is why we need to assure ourselves that we do not forget the unforgettable, and we can only do this through education of each generation. Paix, mes amis.
I agree and +1 on your earlier post to this.

I would also add that I think we need to do more than just not forget what happened, but also to try to understand the negative aspects of human nature. I think our 'tribal' nature can manifest itself very negatively at times. If we understand and can identify it, I think it would help to prevent violence and mass murder in the future.
 

·
Canuck of Enlightenment
Joined
·
949 Posts
It is good that they are seperating church and state. I am just amazed that people could be so blind to history. Maybe, we are doomed to repeat it, if it is fogotten.

I think Darwin was wrong, we are not evolving only self destructing slowly. How stupid we have become. :mad:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,882 Posts

·
Canadian By Choice
Joined
·
117,692 Posts
"Let us all try to create a future with less horror and shame for our children." An excellent point in an excellent posting, bryanc. Paix, mon ami.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top