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Do you have a general emergency/contingency plan in place?

  • I/we have a general emergency situation plan in place and ready to go.

    Votes: 3 12.5%
  • I/we do not have a plan in place for a general emergency situation, but believe I/we should.

    Votes: 11 45.8%
  • No such plan in place. I/we do not believe that establishing one would be a meaningful effort.

    Votes: 6 25.0%
  • Other – Please elaborate if you will.

    Votes: 4 16.7%
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}<-('o')-
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
All the news and world events as of late has prompted me to wonder…what would I/we do if…

It is not inconceivable that we here in Canada (or elsewhere) could experience some sort of event that could cause a disruption in communications, travel, food and energy supplies, medical services, etc. and potentially require an evacuation or an extended shelter in place situation.

Other than having a family/home based plan established in the event of an emergency at home, we do not have a plan for a crisis with any larger of a scope.

In the event we need to evacuate quickly, we are not ready. We do not have our papers together in one file, we do not have a “grab-and-go” pack of basic personal items ready, etc.

Left over from our Houston/ hurricane season days, we do have a backpack ready packed with first aid and basic survival items. It is probably sorely in need of updating and replenishment.

I also haven’t given much thought to what electronic equipment I would pack..the lightest portable computer with appropriate cables and of course a back-up of all our important files. I don’t have something like this ready. In an emergency situation, I can’t count on having the time to make it happen either.

Some may believe this is a tin-foil toque mentality, but I believe that it would be prudent for me and mine to have an established plan in place for a general crisis situation.

I fully realize that no plan can cover every contingency, every scenario, disasters being unpredictable and all, but establishing general principles would go a long way in helping individuals think for themselves, as there is a high probability that we would not be all conveniently together at the time action needs to be taken.

We cannot count on being able to coordinate our actions and movement via standard communication means. We cannot count on using our usual transportation routes and methods. We cannot count on our own home to be the safest option for a shelter in place scenario. Okay, what are our next options?

I have no idea what my child’s school’s plan might be (assuming they have one) in the event of a general emergency. Would they require her to stay there? Would they allow her to leave? Maybe I should find out.
 

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Nowhere to hike to from Toronto, so it's pretty much limited to food, water, hand crank radio and some extra medical supplies. The roads out of here would be a solid parking lot.
 

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IAMSTIG
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I have a plan in place to cover the most likely crisis we'd face...a fire. All our important documents are in a fireproof safe and I have an off site backup of our data. The one crisis we're definitely not prepared for is a serious economic one though I guess we could pull our RRSPs etc.
 

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We're much better prepared if we can stay in the house. Plenty of food (not so much water, something that needs be addressed), wood burning stove in the absence of gas/electricity (cooking & heat, proven in a power outage last winter), propane BBQ, small genset, etc.

As far as having to leave home, I can live off the land if needed but the complications come in with the spice & chillens. Given a two minute exodus, not well prepared. Sure, we can probably get most of the papers/files out in the case of a fire, but that's about it. Given an hour, yeah, I can pull enough stuff together to form a short term survival pack (including tent, sleeping bags, first aid kit, food, water, white gas cookstove, etc) for all of us & get the majority of paper & electronic files out the door. While we have offsite backups, if we're in an emergency situation then there is a good chance they will be, too.

I do need to look into one of those hand crank radios...
 

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I have a plan in place to cover the most likely crisis we'd face...a fire. All our important documents are in a fireproof safe and I have an off site backup of our data. The one crisis we're definitely not prepared for is a serious economic one though I guess we could pull our RRSPs etc.
Here's the deal. If everyone had the same thought as you, the banks would collapse, period. A run on investments would gut the system, sure as shinola. And terribly quickly, too.

Mind you, we'd all be wanting the same thing - liquid cash on top of all the other survivalist gear like food and water, etc. So while I agree with your instincts, I can see how money might quickly become useless. Money is for civilized nations. When it's hard core survival, barter - and might - reign supreme.
 

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Relatively easy to plan if the roof stays over your head. Something else altogether if your home is destroyed especially during a harsh winter like we have been having.

Simplest kit I can think of would be a good hunting knife, a bowstring, arrowheads, some binder twine, cold weather gear, some sort of water bottle, and matches.

Open to other extremely lightweight ideas.

Obviously those in densely populated areas would have different ideas.
 

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Canadian By Choice
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116,988 Posts
Ice storms, blizzards and hurricanes, which have caused power to be out for up to four days, and in the case of a blizzard, blocking movement too far from the house, has gotten me into this frame of mind for preparedness. My wife laughs at me, but then is grateful when we are ready for this sort of event. Luckily, each time these events happen, neighbors pull together.
 

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My plan is to either be friends with those with a contingency plan, or failing that, be stronger and faster than those with a contingency plan.

;-)
 

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Canadian By Choice
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My plan is to either be friends with those with a contingency plan, or failing that, be stronger and faster than those with a contingency plan.

;-)
Very wise, hayesk, although there should be no need of being "stronger or faster", in that those with a plan usually share ............. to those who are kind and helpful and in need. Paix, mon ami.
 

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Gotcha.

Yeah, it's always good to have savings, investments, etc. - particularly if one loses one's job.
 

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Tritium Glow
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I voted 'other' for the simple reason that yes, we're prepared for some minor short term annoyances such as power outages, fire, etc. but nothing in terms of a major catastrophe.

Living in the GTA it would be impossible to get out quickly or immediately. The only thing we could do is hunker down and wait out whatever it may be. I do however have what could be called an 'urban' survival kit. ;)
 

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People tend to put off these things. During the cold war, I was with the RCAF in Europe (62-67) and we were all advised to have food, water and med supplies at home because if the balloon went up, our families had to fend for themselves on the economy if we were called into the base. I don't know of anybody that really did it though. We were stationed 15 minutes flying time from the Communist states but human nature being what it is, we figured it wouldn't happen on our watch. Dumb I guess but that's the way life is.
 

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We have a 6 person tent and food supplies and cooking/heating fuel for two weeks (just in case the house becomes uninhabitable). Water might be more of an issue - we have a few gallons. Water tank is strapped securely to the house frame, so as long as the house doesn't collapse we should be able to use that for a short term water supply. Otherwise we'll have to find a creek for water, or wait for rain.

Living outside of Vancouver we know that if (when) the Big One comes we'll be on our own for days if not weeks. Being rural we're used to helping our neighbours, so if we need help, we know our neighbours will probably help, and of course if the positions are reversed we'd be helping them to the best of our abilities.

One of our local food producers (Holy Crap™) states that they will stockpile enough of their product to feed everyone up here for a certain period of time. Our local elementary school has the mobile hospital stored in kiosks out back of the school.

A friend of mine has been evacuated twice due to forest fires - try to learn from her experience and know what is truly valuable.

(One of my habits is never letting the car gas tank get less than half full. Just in case.)

Contemplating getting a generator, but we do have lots of fire wood. If we survive the initial calamity (ie: house doesn't collapse during the shaking or explose from gas leaks from broken gas lines) we should be okay.
 

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The only emergency I've ever really contemplated the survival plan for is a full-scale zombie attack.

I'm pretty sure that plan, if modified slightly, would cover most any crisis.
 

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It occurs to me that a couple of proven fish lures, line and a fillet knife should also be considered essential. Had not thought of them as I am not a fisherman.
 

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I chose other, because although I don't have something prepared per say, nor a plan, but I have trained myself and thrive when the basic luxuries we in Canada call the bare necessities are not present, through moments of severe poverty to ruffing it in the wilderness, and have it in the back of my mind what I need to grab, which would take me a maximum of 5 minutes to complete. I'm already an extremely light packer, so taking too much is literally not an issue. I have to say, for moments like this, in the long run, I don't envy the rich.
 
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