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Discussion Starter #1
I'm having some fun playing Bell, Telus (yeah, I know...same as Bell) and Rogers against each other, as our contracts are up for renewal.

What we want is a simple bundle, which of course none of them offer: home internet, and three cell phones on a shared data plan (we have wifi essentially everywhere, so we don't need their overpriced data plans for our iPhones). We explicitly don't want to pay for any hone TV, home land line, or unnecessary texting, caller ID, voice mail, emails or any other rubbish.

I'm having some fun externalizing years of frustration with Rogers on some undeserving minion expressing myself (thank you Monty Python... the phrase "festering heap of parrot droppings" would never of occurred to me independently) with regard to their various "packages".

So my question for you all is what sort of rate would you consider to be the maximum reasonable amount to pay in Atlantic Canada for home internet (high bandwidth; Netflix is our sole source of TV and my son plays a lot of video games; blackOps, League of Ledgends, etc.) and three cell phones?
 

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Do you heave any Bell resellers in the Maritime's?

Something like TekSavvy here?
 

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My experience with Rogers is that no matter what Internet contract I select, they move the ball in the middle of it. I've moved up into one of their highest Internet tiers to avoid overage charges, and they compensated by doubling the price on overages. Rogers is the Devil.
 

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And don't look for relief from the CRTC, because the government is in business with them all.

Friends, it's all about the tax on your bill.
 

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And don't look for relief from the CRTC, because the government is in business with them all.

Friends, it's all about the tax on your bill.
That's not exactly true. They recently gave some relief to consumers. Maximum 2 yr contracts for cell phones, much easier and fair cancellation terms, etc.

What I wish they'd do is make contracts illegal right across the board. I've never had or needed a contract for my home phone, internet, or cable tv... why do I need one for a cell phone? The provider will try to say that it's to pay the phone off over the terms of the contract, but you still pay the same rate if you pay full price up front for the phone.
 

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peek-a-boo
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And don't look for relief from the CRTC, because the government is in business with them all.

Friends, it's all about the tax on your bill.
Government isn't really the problem. This government, despite their obvious huge warts has done some things to open the market to others. I'll give them a C for effort.

But the trouble is, like most industries, since government is a problem for major corporations greed runs, they simply try to get 'their own' into government to remove the roadblocks.
 

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I wonder if Verizon is able to get in, if competition will heat up. I have noticed it getting better *ever so slightly* over the last few years aside from the recent CRTC decisions. (Which I think only serve to clarify ie $99 is a subsidized price & when you terminate your contract you pay off the balance of that)

I'm actually quite happy with my Koodoo plan right now. Best value I've had in a long time.
 

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peek-a-boo
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we renewed ours recently, for less than the previous contracts we got unlimited local and unlimited canada wide calling plus 8 gigs data to share. The unlimited calling canada wide is fantastic, sure beats the 350 minutes I had before.
 

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And don't look for relief from the CRTC, because the government is in business with them all.

Friends, it's all about the tax on your bill.
Absolutely. The government has done nothing but occasionally give consumers a tiny break as a proxy for letting the companies go into all out war with each other. It's funny, because some consumers have come to see this as a normal business model. In what other business do you see the government deciding who can or can't compete with the established companies?
 

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The government has done nothing but occasionally give consumers a tiny break, as a proxy for letting the companies go into all out war with each other.
You see it. Pearls before swine.

They own the airwaves, is the ownership of the air far behind?
 
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