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The following is from www.macminute.com

Oh my God!!!

Microsoft is acquiring some assets of Connectix, including Virtual PC, the popular emulation software that allows Windows to run on a Mac, reports c|net. "Representatives of the Redmond, Wash.-based software giant said Virtual PC for the Mac will continue to be sold and that Microsoft plans to continue developing the software, which has more than 1 million active users. A Microsoft executive said the company did not purchase the software to kill it, nor does Microsoft plan to stop developing its native Macintosh software, such as the Mac OS X version of Office." Microsoft, which plans to announce the deal on Thursday, declined to comment on financial terms. Some Connectix employees will join Microsoft, although no details were provided. The company will also gain control of an unreleased server virtualization product that Connectix is developing.
 

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VertiGoGo wrote:
Microsoft is acquiring some assets of Connectix, including Virtual PC, the popular emulation software that allows Windows to run on a Mac, reports c|net.

You might be interested in this thread, then (which has been discussing this very topic).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
And here is the message I received earlier today, straight from the horse"s mouth:

Dear Valued Connectix Customer,

We at Connectix would like to thank you for your ongoing
support and continued use of Connectix' award-winning
products. Today we would like you to be among the first
to learn the exciting news pertaining to Connectix
technology and what it means for you now and in the future.

We are announcing today that Microsoft Corporation has
acquired the virtual machine solutions of Connectix
Corporation including Virtual PC for Mac, Virtual PC for
Windows and Virtual Server. We at Connectix are very
excited about this venture, as it will greatly benefit
existing Connectix customers as well as future users of
virtual machine technology.

This acquisition opens the door to a tremendous number of
opportunities for advances in virtual machine technology
by way of improved research, development, professional
support and services. Connectix looks forward to
integrating with Microsoft to provide a seamless transition
of technology for our customers in the near term, and to
make next generation virtual machine solutions available to
you and your business in the future.

Microsoft will continue to develop existing virtual machine
technology from Connectix and, over the next six months,
will integrate these new technology developments into the
Windows and Mac product portfolios. During the six-month
transition, Connectix will continue to sell and support
Virtual PC for Windows, Virtual PC for Macintosh and Virtual
PC for OS/2 through the current Connectix distribution
channel. You can be assured that Microsoft is committed to
continuing customer support for you, our existing Connectix
customers, and will assume the customer support function at
the end of the six-month transition period.

We at Connectix realize you may have questions or concerns
regarding this acquisition and what it means for you now
and in the future. Please do not respond directly to this
email. For additional information, including a detailed
FAQ and the official Press Release, please visit:
http://www.connectix.com/acquisition/

We thank you for your continued support and are excited
about what this acquisition means to our customers and
partners, further extending the power of virtual machine
technology to users worldwide.

Sincerely,

The Connectix Team
 

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Connectix is actually questioning it's very existance at this point; they only have Ram Doubler and Double Talk, neither of which are OSX compatible or even have an earthly use in an OSX enviornment.

All of the tech staff are gone to Microsoft; the only people left at Connectix are Sales staff.

"The Microsoft deal has created a significant change in our product roadmap, and so we are going to have to do an evaluation and reset. We don't have any firm plans, but closing the company and starting a new venture is also possible," [said CEO and President Roy McDonald in an eWeek interview, Wednesday].
 

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translation for those of your that are not familiary with 'corp-speak' of the CEO's comments.

"I just made a bundle of cash in the M$ deal and I now have a real estate agent looking for my retirement property in the Caribbean. I have to stay on and look somewhat sad since most of our clients will be screwed along with employees."
 

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Connectix has a long sordid history of selling out to other companies... case in point being their Virtual Playstation software being sold to Sony.

However, I wouldn't mourn the "loss" of Virtual PC. I don't think it's really going anywhere, as M$ probably sees it as another way to sell more copies of Windoze to users who ortherwise wouldn't. I have 4 copies of Windoze (NT, 2000, 95, 98), all bought because of Virtual PC. Why would M$ kill it?

Besides, Connectix doesn't have the greatest record when it comes to customer service, as I remember having some trouble with my VPC upgrade to version 5, two measly months after I bought version 4.0, which really sucked.

Connectix filled a void with VPC. It was a good product (although dog-slow in OSX)... however they aren't the only fish in the sea. Other products will fill that void if VPC is killed, such as SoftWindows (remember them?), or some other clever start-up. Heck, Orange Micro might even start selling PC compatibility cards again!

Buck up. It's only software. Mac developers are like hydra - kill one and two others take their place.

-SJ.
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SpanishJoe:
Connectix has a long sordid history of selling out to other companies... case in point being their Virtual Playstation software being sold to Sony.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Don't forget the "used-to-be-Mac-compatible" QuickCam line of mini video cameras.

Regardless, VPC will go on. Why would Microsoft give up a chance to sell us Mac users a Windows license. It's not like they'd get more money if we bought PCs.
 

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At the risk of sounding like a Microsoft apologist, count me in as someone who thinks this could be a good deal. Some have contended that this could signal the end of the VPC ability as we know it. While Microsoft's behaviour in the past certainly supports this theory, I just don't think that they would stand to benefit much from adopting a "buy it to kill it" strategy as far as VPC is concerned. In fact, that's an image they can no longer afford to perpetuate.

Rather, I think this development suggests a couple of encouraging things: that Microsoft is still investing in the Mac Business Unit; and that they've got something up their sleeve as far as interoperability is concerned.

Give it time and let's see what they have in mind for VPC. Could be interesting.
 

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"... I don't think it's really going anywhere, as M$ probably sees it as another way to sell more copies of Windoze to users who ortherwise wouldn't. ..."

Microsoft was not interested in Virtual PC, per se. As a standalone product for "client" computers, it's really nothing to get excited over, especially since MS made more money from VPC than Connectix did (even if every copy didn't come with a licensed version of Windows, MS's profits per OS are higher than Connectix's per VirtualPC engine). 'Why buy the cow when you get the milk for free?', or more precisely, 'why buy the cow when you you can get paid for the air it breathes?'

However, Connectix had been working on products, based on VPC, that directly attacked MS's business model. I mean right to the core. In other words, I'm sure the offer was more than generous.

Connectix's Virtual Server, in Beta today, was the real plum. Since it's based on VPC, of course MS had to get the 'whole cow'.

"... But Microsoft's biggest marketing emphasis surrounding the announcement has involved the Virtual Server product, which gives the company an exit strategy for its numerous enterprise customers running applications on Windows NT 4.0 Server and helps Microsoft compete with data-center veterans such as Sun and IBM's Unix group, which offer virtualization software on their platforms. ..."
-ENT News

Although I at first believed that this would mean the end of Linux on VPC, I am now coming around to the opposite view. MS can offer an enterprise-level product, which will run Linux, on a Windows Server-class OS. Think about it ... not only can MS SELL the Linux virtual machine for more-or-less what they get for an OS (something Linux vendors can't do) they can have that VM run on top of a paid, licensed copy of Windows.

Obviously, someone like RedHat should have bought Connectix. MS is going to control enterprise user's Linux OS, much like they control the web with IE.
 

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by Lisa Schmeiser, Senior Associate Editor, Macworld
([email protected])


VirtualPC, Real Microsoft: Mac users were abuzz last week
following Microsoft's planned purchase of Connectix's software
program Virtual PC. The software, which lets Mac users emulate
the Windows environment on the Macs and thus run Windows-only
programs, has been one of the ways in which Mac users avoided
compulsory coversion to a different platform. Now, with the
company behind the dominant PC platform owning the software, what
does that mean for Virtual PC or the Mac community at large?
According to Microsoft, it only means good things: Tim McDonough,
a Microsoft Macintosh Business Unit (MacBU) director, said, "this
is just a great way that we saw to expand our Mac commitment to
our Mac customers." Others don't see it that way: industry
analysts have suggested that Microsoft's motives for purchasing
the software include maintaining the Mac OS as a guard against
antitrust allegations or avoiding the issue of having to develop
applications that work on the Mac. Apple is steering clear of
commenting on any but the brightest of motives. Ron Okamoto,
Apple's vice president of Worldwide Developer Relations, repeats
Microsoft's assertion that its purchase supports Macs by saying,
"Adding Virtual PC to its product portfolio is yet another
example of Microsoft's continued commitment to the Mac platform.
For years, Virtual PC has helped people who want to own a Mac but
need to run legacy PC applications. We're glad to see Virtual PC
go into such good hands." Time will tell if Virtual PC will
continue to bridge the gap between the Mac and legacy
applications, or if it's going to become the alternative to Mac
versions of future software as well.
 
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