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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thanks, Reboot. I had never heard of CrashPlan or iDrive so I had to look them up. CrashPlan is more expensive but also unlimited. You're right: plugging in that disk has good intentions. And what if the disk dies. Do you think either of these are worth it for just a private individual, non-work related?

I live in Thailand with no medical insurance; not available after 70. Guess you might say I'm no good as disaster planning, eh...
 

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......People will not remember to plug in an external drive to back up. I see it over and over. .....
THIS. For years I was (and sadly, continue to be) the tech support dude for a colleague who is a very good academic, but the classic absent-minded professor. He would travel the world, with laptop bag slung over his shoulder, unzipped, and only once in some four decades did he have a laptop snatched (and even then, it was while brunching somewhere and someone slid his laptop bag from under his chair). Still, he was accident-prone. A glass of wine into his keyboard while on an international flight to deliver a keynote presentation (and of course, no backup to memory stick nor cloud). Liquid-related damage was the most frequent cause of laptop death. He averaged a year per laptop before some disaster struck. And I was the guy who had to save his bacon. Twice I had him purchase an external usb-powered backup drive. Either he'd forget it; or the cable to connect it; or he'd forget he had it; or it was left behind in one of his offices around the world.

Eventually I realized there was no way to change his behaviour. Old dog, new tricks.

So I convinced him to shell out some bucks, and we purchased the one solution that saved him from future disasters. Something that you can't get anymore, in one of Apple's brilliant (insert sarcastic emoji here) product cancellation decisions (2018): The Airport Time Capsule. (cue harps and angels singing from on high).

While it didn't serve to back him up when he was out of the house travelling, it more than saved his bacon since he was frequently enough at home (and by this point, emeritus professor and worked mostly from home). Every keystroke instantly went over the wifi to his TimeCapsule router / back-up system with Time Machine. He didn't have to touch it, nor think about it. It was invisible. it was magic. And it still is - it's still ticking along in his house, covering his ass on a daily basis. The WiFi speed isn't so important to his needs, and he has no great interest in the "latest and greatest" tech. It just works.

Now that much of what we do is covered with iCloud Drive / Backup, working from Dropbox, Google Drive, etc., the need for this is somewhat reduced - but it's nice to know that backup is always ready and waiting for when disaster strikes...

For those wondering what can provide that functionality today, there doesn't appear to be anything quite as 'magical' to fill the void...



 

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When it comes to backing up a laptop I recommend that my customers use something like crash plan, iDrive, etc. People will not remember to plug in an external drive to back up. I see it over and over.
Maybe you should teach them and/or point out some of the features of Apple's OS such as Calendars and appointments and Reminders etc. Then you wouldn't have to see it happening all the time or "over and over"... 😏


- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Mark, this is a seriously great story. I fit the MO, though I've only ever had one (fatal) keyboard spill (my toddler). I've never owned a Time Capsule but sure can see the advantages.

Patrick's suggestion of using Reminders is a good one for backup. There are a lot of crannies in my Mac I've never explored.

We probably only need monthly rather than hourly or even weekly. CCC or SuperDuper! are gold standard...if the disk itself doesn't die.

It's unfortunate to know I may be visiting this condition again!
 

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Is it possible to attach a usb drive to a router and use it with time machine?
According to this Google Search, connecting to a USB port on a router should be possible but I would be surprised if it would work with Time Machine:

Is it possible to attach a usb drive to a router Mac
Routers that support this feature are generally designed with Windows-based networking in mind. Fortunately, Apple's Mac OS X operating system supports networking with Windows networks. You can access the USB drive connected to the router by mounting it as a network volume with the Mac OS X Finder application.


- Patrick
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