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I should get my copy of Panther next week, so now seems a good time to check on the above:

My innocent self says; "hey Apple has had a lot of time to look at this; Panther should just be an upgrade".

Now as we know, computing is an art, not a science, especially when it comes to installs and upgrades. Now given that 10.2.8 DID screw up my battery, I am not inclined to believe everything that comes out of California. So should I clean install or not? and WHY?

If I do a clean install, then HOW? I have zillions of prefs and no intention to backup up each and every one of them by hand.

PS: Dear Santa, I have been a good boy; I have used Cocktail regularly and Disk Warrior occasionally. Please let me have a good Christmas with a shiny new iPod and an operating system that doesn't drive me nuts... :confused:
 

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I've done a ton of OS installs. WIndoze, Linux, Unix, Mac.

I always always always start with a clean disk. Short of the updates that come via Software Update, I trust upgrades about as far as I could comfortably spit a rat!

My modus operandi with my Macs have been making use of an external fireware HD. I clone the contents of my laptop (the whole enchilada) onto the external drive. Wipe the laptop drive clean. Then install.

When it makes sense, I'll go grab certain files off of the backup to reset preferences, restore mail messages, etc. Everything else is setup by hand. I don't consider it an inconvenience.

It's like moving into a new home. You have your way you like things setup, but you might discover a new way to do something you hadn't seen before.
 

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I agree that starting with a clean disk is best, but I was too lazy and didn't have another hard drive to save old stuff in.

So I used "archive & install" in panther and it works great. It basically makes a folder on your system called "previous systems" right next to the "System" and "System Folder". It saves all your preferences and even another copy of applications and important stuff in there.

But if your comp is running well now with Jag you shouldn't have a problem. The theory is that if something should mess up or your preferences are screwed you should be able to manually grab them from this folder. I have yet to need anything from in there and have erased most of it.

So you should be good with the "Archive & Install" option when installing.
 

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Call me crazy, but I have always upgraded Macs; right back to System7. The archive and install option in OSX is a great safeguard for the skittish.

Windows? Well the installs are a little flaky at the best of times, but usually work fine. I've had about the same number of problems doing either, so I can't even recommend one over the other.

Linux? I only did clean installs, but I didn't have a lot of files to back up in the first place, and my partitions were generous by Linux standards. Don't use it now.

I've long been in the habit of having a separate partition for documents and the OS/Applications, so that may be a factor. I still have docs (on my current Documents partition) that I've created with every version of the OS right back to System6.0.8.

My philosophy has always been make sure you Docs are safe (backed up) and don't worry about the rest. You can reinstall applications if you need to.
 
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