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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering purchasing a Samsung T7 500gb ssd to back up my iMac's 500gb ssd. I already have a 500gb hd type running with Time Machine. Is the S T7 a good buy, and to also install CCC?
The reason I want an additional back up is due to the number of hydro bumps we are subjected to thoughout the year. These bumps knock out all our electronic appliances and I am afraid that one day they may damage a circuit board.

Thanks,
Sonny
 

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My question is why spend on an SSD for TM ...bigger rotational makes more sense for TM
Your iMac power supply is pretty robust. Get a filtering UPS if concerned.
 

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MacDoc is right. The SSD's advantage is incremental speed, which is unnecessary for backup. A 1 TB spin drive costs less than $50.
 

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5400 is fine - more reliable.
 

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MacDoc is right. The SSD's advantage is incremental speed, which is unnecessary for backup. A 1 TB spin drive costs less than $50.

I was also just thinking and wondering if the continual updating and various linking that Time machine does could be detrimental to the way that SSD drives work with all the rewriting going on. My understanding is that solid state drives don't work that well when that happens and could possibly shorten their read-write lifespan.

Just a thought and wondering...

BTW: I've never recall reading that 5400 RPM HDDs are "more reliable". I've always put my faith into Enterprise drives such as the 7200 RPM Western Digital Black spinner hard drives. Fast quiet and cool running and reasonably priced and come with a longer warranty than most average drives.


- Patrick
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Thanks to all who replied. Not sure what size I need for an iMac though. So far I read reviews on APC 600VA and 650VA and with some bad reviews on both. Anyway something to consider.
Most sites that sell such equipment have estimator applications along with suggestions which will provide you with some alternative models to suit your situation.

Tripp Lite makes some excellent stabilizers and automatic backup power supplies. I am a bit surprised that the APC models have poor reviews. Maybe that is just for those particular models or the reviewers were having a bad day???

Also, Costco used to carry some small UPS power supplies/ power stabilizers at a very reasonable price.


- Patrick
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Thanks to all who replied. Not sure what size I need for an iMac though.
Ideally the same size as your iMac drive and have two ...one for TM and one for a CCC clone.

For less money - buy a single drive twice the size of the drive and split into two....one for TM and one for a CCC clone.
 

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Thanks to all who replied. Not sure what size I need for an iMac though. So far I read reviews on APC 600VA and 650VA and with some bad reviews on both. Anyway something to consider.
Ideally the same size as your iMac drive
I'm not sure if the OP (sch) was asking about the required size of a backup hard drive or an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)... ???


- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ideally the same size as your iMac drive and have two ...one for TM and one for a CCC clone.

For less money - buy a single drive twice the size of the drive and split into two....one for TM and one for a CCC clone.
Sorry for the inadequate explanation. I was referring to the size of the UPS.
Also, I already have a 500g hard disk TM backup. I was considering a backup to the backup, hence the 500g Samsung ssd which I understand are more reliable than a HD. This exercise is mainly because my wife has a lot of photos and files and she would be VERY upset if she lost them.
With regards to the reviews in Amazon re the 600VA and 650VA there were 5% who gave negative reviews of both units.
I agree that some reviewers might have had a bad day.
Anyway still undecided.
 

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I already have a 500g hard disk TM backup. I was considering a backup to the backup, hence the 500g Samsung ssd which I understand are more reliable than a HD.
Just consider that a single backup of user data is the absolute minimum you can have, and you may find that the reliability how solid state drive is not as good as many make them out to be.

Regardless of Drive Type, not forgetting that rotating HDDs usually give you an indication of impending failure, SSDs seem to just suddenly die when they quit working, so you may want to consider creating and using a bootable clone that you should be able to do with Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC) or SuperDuper (SD) that would complement your Time Machine backup.

Regardless of which backup method you use, it is a good idea to occasionally check it to make sure it is working properly.

If the data you want to protect is very valuable, it is often suggested to keep a backup copy off property in case your normal backup may get destroyed with fire, theft or whatever.

PS: If you are in an area with goofy unstable power, I would lean towards using a rotary HDD drive, and add it to the power stabilizer you are going to purchase.


- Patrick
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A slow rotating rotational is very reliable long term. Your money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just consider that a single backup of user data is the absolute minimum you can have, and you may find that the reliability how solid state drive is not as good as many make them out to be.

Regardless of Drive Type, not forgetting that rotating HDDs usually give you an indication of impending failure, SSDs seem to just suddenly die when they quit working, so you may want to consider creating and using a bootable clone that you should be able to do with Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC) or SuperDuper (SD) that would complement your Time Machine backup.

Regardless of which backup method you use, it is a good idea to occasionally check it to make sure it is working properly.

If the data you want to protect is very valuable, it is often suggested to keep a backup copy off property in case your normal backup may get destroyed with fire, theft or whatever.

PS: If you are in an area with goofy unstable power, I would lean towards using a rotary HDD drive, and add it to the power stabilizer you are going to purchase.


- Patrick
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Thanks Patrick for your suggestions. I'm leaning towards the Samsung SSD for a number of reasons. First of all I want something my wife can deal with (thinking ahead here), and secondly with a new SSD I can install CCC as you suggested. This way I'll have a HDD and a SSD (one of each is better than two the same). And thirdly, an UPS's battery would need replacing periodically.

We bought a refurbished iMac (8megs ram, 500 SSD- Catalina) almost two years ago, and it has worked well. The old iMac (2009) still works, but not used, and has survived all the power failures and hydro bumps so I expect the new one will as well. I had installed a surge protector on the incoming hydro feed and hopefully it will do its job. And of course, there are the power bars with surge protection.

We could use some of Tropical Australia's weather here now instead of all this rain.

Thanks to all,





Thanks to all
 

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Thanks Patrick for your suggestions. I'm leaning towards the Samsung SSD for a number of reasons.
Just to add to your choices, you might want to look into the OWC SSDs and some of their advantages such as not needing to enable TRIM or Wear leveling with some of their drives:


- Patrick
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OP I still maintain an SSD for your use is a waste of money but up to you and Samsung has issues.
Better Toshiba or WD.
 

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Thanks Patrick for your suggestions. I'm leaning towards the Samsung SSD for a number of reasons. First of all I want something my wife can deal with (thinking ahead here), and secondly with a new SSD I can install CCC as you suggested. This way I'll have a HDD and a SSD (one of each is better than two the same). And thirdly, an UPS's battery would need replacing periodically.

We bought a refurbished iMac (8megs ram, 500 SSD- Catalina) almost two years ago, and it has worked well. The old iMac (2009) still works, but not used, and has survived all the power failures and hydro bumps so I expect the new one will as well. I had installed a surge protector on the incoming hydro feed and hopefully it will do its job. And of course, there are the power bars with surge protection.

We could use some of Tropical Australia's weather here now instead of all this rain.

Thanks to all,





Thanks to all
If you are going to go past Catalina keep in mind bootable back ups are a thing of the past from Big Sur on for now. It doesn’t look like they ever will be possible.

I’m not happy about it. You can back up your data partition and restore all your third-party apps and your files, but you would have to reinstall the system and then migrate. For troubleshooting purposes unfortunately it’s going to be impossible as of now to create a bootable back up. If your having a hard drive problem for example and want to boot from an external back up that will not be possible.

Bootable back ups with Big Sur and beyond.
 

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If you are going to go past Catalina keep in mind bootable back ups are a thing of the past from Big Sur on for now. It doesn’t look like they ever will be possible.
It seems that that is no longer true and the problems have been overcome, at least with using the latest version of Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC):
Yes, you can have bootable backups on macOS Big Sur
Mike's picture by Mike | November 3, 2020



- Patrick
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personally I have a local backup and then use a cloud backup service as a backup in case the house was ever completely destroyed. Price is minimal and never needing to worry about a hard driving failing on the cloud end is nice. I use Backblaze. I have my MacBook Pro backup to this at home and my iMac at work uses this. It is nice as you don't pay more if you have more files. At work I have 2 external drives plus the internal 1 TB drive. All 3 get backed up to the cloud a well as the time machine. I have had a time machine hard drive go in the last 4 years, not a huge deal unless I needed anything backup on it, but because I have the cloud backup that is not an issue and the time machine back-up is more for ease of use getting a backup should I delete something I should not have.

www.backblaze.com
Not affiliated with the website, just a user of their service.
 

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It seems that that is no longer true and the problems have been overcome, at least with using the latest version of Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC):
Yes, you can have bootable backups on macOS Big Sur
Mike's picture by Mike | November 3, 2020



- Patrick
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The article you posted was from a year ago. The one I posted was from a week or so ago. I’ll have to check more into it but I would probably go with the more recent version.
 
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