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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're going to have a baby in March. I suggested that if it's a boy, we could call him Jobs -- as in Jobs Rogers.

For some reason, my wife didn't take me seriously. She didn't like Woz Rogers either ...
 

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mrogers wrote:
We're going to have a baby in March. I suggested that if it's a boy, we could call him Jobs -- as in Jobs Rogers.

For some reason, my wife didn't take me seriously. She didn't like Woz Rogers either ...


Why not call him Mister? I'm sure you've never heard that suggestion before!
 

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I don't think naming your baby Woz or Jobs is all that great... It would be a mouthful and Woz and Jobs as a first name IMHO, I think if you really want to do it, I'd use Steve for a first name...
 

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As an educator, and a father, remember that this child has to live with this name for the rest of his life. Being a baby boomer, I had friends in the 60s who named their children Moonbeam, Starlight, Foz, Muffin, Stoned, et al. Think long and hard on a name that will have this boy or girl wanting to talk to you when they are a teenager.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My first name is Mark. Since the boy would be a newer, more up-to-date version of myself, I could call him iMark.

(Don't worry, folks, I'm just kidding. The child will get a nice, normal name.)
 

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My first name is Marc.......my evil twin brother was named Cram (Marc spelled backwards). Would you believe that I had more people misspell my first name (e.g., Mark) rather than questioning my brother's name. Go figure!
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by macnutt:
Call him "Susan"....he'll learn how to fight at a very early age. ;)<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, if it must be like that, then it ought to be "Lisa".

At least it's congruent with AppleFanaticism[tm]

:D

My other suggestions:

Manzana = Apple [in Spanish]
Maçã = Apple [in Portuguese]
Afal = Apple [in Welsh]

Of course, it'd be nice if our Western culture allowed the child
to choose their own name upon reaching adulthood, like some
cultures do.

Then one does not have to be stuck with
"Dalailama" for the rest of their life.
[yes, I know someone like that.
]

Whatever you do, don't name the kid "Ted"! :D

G/<

P.S.> You can always encode "Jobs" into Latin =
Operae. Or Opus.. then he can be "Opie". :D
 

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In an earlier reply to this thread, Dr. G mentioned that some people he knew had been named "Moonbeam" "Starlight" "Foz" "Muffin" and "Stoned".

I think a LOT of them must have moved to Salt Spring! We also have a "Moonchild" a "Rainbowsong" and lots of dogs called "Toke" around these parts.
 

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It's not always so bad having an unusual name for a child; the trick is to make sure that when you name the child that one or more of their middle names are more "common".

That way, if when they grow up and are in a more creative or artistic field, they can choose to go with the more unusual name, however, if they are in a more traditional field (such as banking or business) they can use the more common name in order to ensure acceptability. The idea is to give them a range of choices amongst their names, so that they can choose amongst them based upon their future life and occupation, if necessary, (without having to go through a legal name change.)

I have both kinds of names myself, but choose to keep using my own given name of "Capucine" as it was different and unusual -- just like me, and I always liked to be recognized as different than others, since I generally was, even at a very early age.

In my culture, it is generally thought of as unwise to pick a child's name *before* they are born, as you haven't "met" them yet to discover their personality and character. In fact, my parents waited several weeks to name me...

I was the last of 3 children and a difficult pregnancy and birth. When I was born, unlike my bald siblings, I actually had hair, except it was only on the sides. My mother had hand-sewn me a little brown robe with a hood and waist tie. Apparently they saw me in that robe and discovered that I looked exactly like a miniature "Capucin" monk (the ones founded by St. Francis of Assissi), but since I was female, they choose the french method of feminizing by adding an "e", hence "Capucine". The name also is the name of a pretty little flower in French, called a "nastursium" in English.


My oldest sister is called "Rhenore", as she was the first child and joint creation of "Rheal" and "Nora"; therefore her name reflected the union of both... Of course, since she was such a beautiful girl growing up, many French boys used to call her "renard" or "fox" since it sounds a bit similar when pronouced with a French accent.

A name can greatly influence how a child feels about themselves growing up; are they just another "plain Jane" or another child who has just inherited the "family name" in the long line of ancestors -- and all the associated "baggage" that can come with it. (John Smith the 6th)

Names often have strong connotations associated with them, that parents might not realize. After all, if you mention a name like "Agnes", most people tend to visualize somebody's aging Aunt... Therefore, the child or person can end up being "pre-judged" by people based on their name, before the other person has ever met or gotten to know them. I always found that by having an unusual name that people generally judged me on my own merit and were more open-minded about me, since they did not have any naming standards upon which to pre-judge me (prejudice)...

Personally, I know that I have a bad prejudice against the name "Gloria", as all the ones I have met and gotten to know in my life have been absolute b*tches; without exception. Everytime I met one, I purposely kept trying to be super open-minded about her, that she would *not* be like the others -- but once I got to know her, she was unfortunatly from the same mold...

Anybody else have repeated bad experiences with a particular name or names?
 

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Why do it at fifteen?

Wait until 19 (age of majority in Canada) and the kid can do whatever the hell he/she wants.

The young adult can then choose to have a ceremony or not. to leave home or not, etc.

A true marking of the passage from childhood into the realm of adulthood.

What better way to acknowledge your child becoming an adult than by asking them; "What do you want?"
 

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You could use numbers, they seem to be gaining popularity as names.
Such as 729 or 3.14159 if you used that you could call them Pi for short.
or if its a girl you could name her 99 after the Get Smart spy chick- Barbara Feldon.
 
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