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Does apple works support cut and paste? I was using the 30 day trial Microsft Word program that came with my Mac. since I am a recent switcher and i'm used to it to do my HW and when i wanted to print, it wouldn't allow it in the trial version. So I tried copying and pasting my work to apple works but apple works doesn't seem to support cut and paste? When i right click there is no cut and paste selections? Am I missing something? Or is it just that Apple works doesn't support it?
 

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haha...don't feel bad...the first time i used appleworks i had that problem too
...I also had a fun time changing the desktop background when i was used to right clicking and picking "set as background". no more of that! at least not when i tried.....unless I'M missing something
 

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haha...don't feel bad...the first time i used appleworks i had that problem too
...I also had a fun time changing the desktop background when i was used to right clicking and picking "set as background". no more of that! at least not when i tried.....unless I'M missing something
 

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A feature of the Mac that switchers find odd but can at times be really useful is dragging text blocks to another window.

Highlight text, click and hold and drag the block.
It can be really useful at times tho cut and paste is used most often.
I will drag text to the desktop when I want to save a chunk. The Mac creates a file for you that you can just click on to move it back into the clipboard memory.
Play a bit with it as it's one of the "under the hood" tricks (useful when you want to drag bookmark into place ).
The mechanism is at work in several parts of the OS for drag and drop functions.
ie dragging an unknown file on top of an application to see if it can open it ( useful with an image file and something like graphic converter )

Even long time Mac users miss some of the more subtle features that make the OS a pleasure and fun to use.

For isntance if you've downloaded several different images in different formats t your desktop or a folder you can gather them with click and hold and drag them on top of an application and open them all within that app (say Graphic converter ) instead of one at a time from within the application. Or stuffing files - just dragging them as a group onto Stuffit or various music format files into iTunes.
Dragging an image to the attachment window instead of a mailer instead of clicking through the add attachments.

Alternate and sometimes really useful ways of drag and drop that may be overlooked by switchers and many Mac users. :cool:

Here is a like you might like to explore why we've been fanatics for so long :D

http://developer.apple.com/documentation/UserExperience/Conceptual/OSXHIGuidelines/XHIGDragDrop/index.html
 

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What's odd is that all they need to do is continue using the keys they've always used (c / x / v), just use "command" instead of "control" - how hard is that?
You'd think those common shortcuts would come naturally to Windoze users, since they were copied from the Mac in the first place.

Cheers :-> Bill
 

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Apple invented cut and paste; the keys used were copied (kind of) by Microsot when it developed Windows. You can tell, too:

All the keys are right there, in a row, near your left hand.

X is for Cut, because it looks like a pair of scissors
C is for Copy, a natural
V is for Paste, because it looks like an insertion arrow, and again, because it's right there beside the other often-used keys.
Z is for Undo, because it's near the cut/copy keys and isn't likely to be the first letter of any other command.


Microsoft changed the helper key because the "Command" key didn't exist on the first IBM x86 keyboards; they added the "Windows" key later.

The other keys are the same because Word was a Mac-only application for 5 years and MS naturally decided to make the first Windows version identical; it was pretty much a straight port of the Mac version. It's also a natural they would carry it over to the OS once they decided to use it for Word for Windows.

Make use of the "control" key; whenver you're looking for a command.

Press Control and click your mouse somewhere, a menu of handy, appropirate commands appears.

In fact, as a former Windows user, most of the appropriate commands you're used to right-clicking for will be there. If you ever buy or plug in a 2-button mouse into your Mac, the very same commands will appear if you right-click.

Try it right now; press control, move the mouse all over and then mouse-click to see what comes up. The ehMac window, the desktop, a file, whatever.

Try this one if you use Safari:

Drag your mouse over this text right now to higlight it.

Control click with your mouse, select the command that isn't copy, and see what happens.

[ November 02, 2003, 03:24 AM: Message edited by: gordguide ]
 

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One challenge I have with recent Switchers is training them to stop using menus for copy / cut / paste....


Apart from the interminable struggle to teach people that the little key with the funky cloverleaf and apple symbols is the "command" key,... sheesh!

What's odd is that all they need to do is continue using the keys they've always used (c / x / v), just use "command" instead of "control" - how hard is that?

m
 
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