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I have largely stayed away from the command line @ much as possible, but i've been recently drawn into it purely due to work - and it's not that bad. ANYHOW, here's my q?:

I went to install Sass (for all you web devs), and as easy as it is, here's what took place.



1st, I didn't have write permissions - whatever - I'm the admin on this lap and...
2nd, that warning was enough go me to abort mission.

Clearly, I saw the red flag and this is what I've always feared from using the command line. Does anyone have some wisdom for me on this one??

Thx.
 

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Enter your password and get on with it.

Just because you're an admin on the system doesn't mean you have write access to all the directories; you'll have to authenticate as root (via sudo) to modify those files/directories.
 

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I have largely stayed away from the command line @ much as possible, but i've been recently drawn into it purely due to work - and it's not that bad. ANYHOW, here's my q?:

I went to install Sass (for all you web devs), and as easy as it is, here's what took place.



1st, I didn't have write permissions - whatever - I'm the admin on this lap and...
2nd, that warning was enough go me to abort mission.

Clearly, I saw the red flag and this is what I've always feared from using the command line. Does anyone have some wisdom for me on this one??

Thx.
You should be fine; as an admin, you have permissions to execute as an administrator but those permissions aren't active until you use sudo. It's similar to how some applications prompt you for a password when you try to install or delete an application from /Applications

That said, you could always cp that 2.0.0 directory to 2.0.0.backup, and then proceed. Better safe than sorry.
 
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