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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I would like some advice on which software should i use with my microtek IIHR to scan family pictures (300) so i can archive them on a cd-rom. I currently have os 9.1 and photshop 5.5. I want to know in jpeg format which is the correct settings to use when acquiring from the scanner. maybe another software would be faster and less heavy since i run a 200 mhz processor.(pm4400) all this in freeware ? is this possible ?

I tried vue scan but it seems to be very long and timely to use it, like the microtek driver with photoshop is quite heavy.

I just want help on the scanning part ,
am i making any sense since this is not a job for me just clean fun archiving family pictures for later use in 3004 or in case of lost of pics.

thanks in advance
 

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What resolution are you scanning these pisctures at? I would use 300 dpi maximum. Whenever I scan photos I just use the Photoshop plug-in that came with my scanner. Once the image is loaded into Photoshop I save it as a TIFF. Stay away from JPG as the compression it uses is not lossless and you will see image degradation start to appear after several open/save cycles.

Scanning photos takes much time and patience. I once had to scan, colour-correct, and touch up over a hundred photos and it took the better part of a week to do the job properly. Obviously I wasn't at the computer for five days solid but usually a good 4 to 6 hours a day. I've not tried any other scanning software, I've always used the Photoshop plug-in. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful.
 

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You should consider getting them put on a PhotoCD as you will get excellent results from a very expensive system with no hassle to you VS marginal results and much hair tearing.

If there are lots of pictures don't be afraid to haggle. :cool:

http://www.torontoimageworks.com/digital/scans.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Outcast you say ; degradation start to appear after several open/save cycles.

I did not know that you could get degradation in digital format...
all my hdd pics are in jpg, should i convert them all ? My database is like over 1K pics.

to MacDoc;
Please no commercial scanning services.
I have lots of pictures (300+) to do now.
thanks

I can do it myself, just need some advice from someone that did lots of pics and found a way to get it done easier and faster. I do not want to edit them just archive them on hard disk or cd-rom.

Which media will last longer and safer ?


This is a great place to get advice , i am glad i found and signed up here .
 

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Pete
Commercial services thrive on quantity - don't dismiss it until you've checked it.
It's not easy to get a quality scan and no desktop scanner other than perhaps the $600 and excellent Epson 3200 will do a really good job, and then you need to know how to get the best as well.
A yes jpegs are lossy, you need a no loss compression scheme if you want full preservation.

With commercial scans you also get multiple sizes so the quality is preserved but you have smaller images for online use etc.
Do take the time to check it out. We've advised this to others and they've been grateful. Those photos are precious if not priceless.

Sometimes DIY is not the best or the least expensive method.

Optical media is fine we recommend a double copy - one to store and one to use and burn them slowly. :cool:
 

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I have a Microtek Scanmaker 3 Plus that I used to use with the
ScanWizard plug-in for PhotoShop or GraphicConverter,
There isn't really a fast way of doing it :(

I replaced my Microtek recently with a Canon Lide 80 USB,
I haven't hooked it up yet...But it's next on my list.

You can still get the ScanWizard plug-in from the Microtek web
site for OS 9xx for free in the support section.

Microtek software link

Save your pictures as TIFF's btw and then burn them to CD's.

Good luck.

Dave :cool:
 

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Stay away from JPG as the compression it uses is not lossless and you will see image degradation start to appear after several open/save cycles.
Not exactly. You can open and close (and save) a JPEG any number of times without degradation. The degradation happens when you change the file, then re-save. This forces your editing program to re-apply the compression algorithm, which will indeed degrade the image after a few cycles.

It is a good idea to use a lossless compression format to store a file (TIFF or native Photoshop, for example) but JPEGs have their place when you need small file size. The secret is to archive the image in the lossless format until you actually require a compressed version, for e-mail or a Web site, for example. Then, make a copy of the master archive and do your editing and JPEG compressing on the copy.

Cheers :-> Bill
 

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If you want to make actual archive quality scans, you should bring your FILM to a proper photo lab. They usually charge about $6 a roll for 300 dpi scans, which is good enough for 4x6 prints, and a fee for the cd, but since you're doing a lot, they may allow you to provide your own cds, especially if you've built up a relationship over the years with your photo lab.

Why should you send it out instead of doing it yourself?

1) Your time is better spent spending it with your friends and family instead of your computer.

2) As much as you say you won't be editing, You will be. Ever heard of dust and scratches? Colour correction?

3) You're new at this (otherwise you wouldn't be asking here) and it will take up every last spare moment you have for a long time.

4) They know what their doing, and have better equipment then you.

5) If you're scanning from prints, you're archiving a lower quality picture, It has already been blown up about 400x from the original, yes this means your little 4x6 or 5x7s are already blow ups. In the scanning world, we would call this interpolation, and we know it's very bad to have to use this function. A hi rez scan will be sharper than your blowups from a photolab is what I'm trying to say.

So, unless you really want to work on your green tan, I would advise you not to tackle this yourself.
One time I scanned some film for a client of mine who called the day that I was suppose to deliver their film, about 5 rolls of film (12 frames/roll) that they wanted so they could view on screen, so I scanned it with my new Epson 2450 flatbed. No correction, not hi rez, no editing, all jpg. This took me about 8 hours to do, and the results looked like crap, and was just good enough, but barely presentable.

So if you actually want to archive your photos, send them out, get it done right. Otherwise, be prepared to cancel your plans on the weekends for the next 4 months if you're lucky. But of course if you're worth less than $6 a day, by all means, DIY

Best media to use is several copies on cds (one you use, the other you put away), HDDs tend to die. Keep original scans, and leave them as is (after touch ups) and lock them. Any major alterations should be saved as another file. Never save as jpg unless you don't want to keep it. Use TIFF.

vince
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I understand that i should use photoshop plug -in that i have with the microtek scanner and acquire one by one each picture.

BUT

I was wondering since someone pointed out that i am not a pro at this and yes , they are right. This is a project to archive my personal family pictures in case of fire or water damage or God forbid...

so what i am seeking is a software that could act like a photocopier interface , it would put my pictures on the flatbed and it would scan only till the end of pic, then auto-save in TIFF then wait for 3-4 sec so i can take it off and put my next pic, place it correctly on the flatbed then it starts automatically and we begin again with a new picture. example of setting the photocopier to 99 and changing the document on every pass of the light of the scanner. Is this too much to ask about a sotware? is it hard to write something like that in apple script maybe? or does it exist in some other form or not ? ( maybe in windows world...) sorry all; i will wash my mouth after saying the bad word starting with W. please no response on that kind of system in this discussion, i am truly mac since 1984.


Again, any advice is still appreciated...please , NO commercial services. i wish to accomplish this family project myself for two reasons, price and x rated materiel of me ! hahaha would not want anyone to dye , get blinded or fall in love after seeing those negatives. hahahaha

seriously i have lots more pictures belonging to gran-parents to do too, so after 2000-3000 pics i will give you all a post report of the task.
 

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macdoc...

What's your opinion...

I bought an Epson 3170. It scans my 2-1/4 negs and transparencies, as well as my 35mm everything. I have used every possible venue with the scanner and am knocked out with the performance(s). The reason I mention the 3170 model, is it has the same resolution capabilities as the 3200 (can't do 4 X 5, but I don't neeed it) but costs considerably less.

It comes with less software than the 3200, but is shipped with Adobe Photoshop Elements. Perfect for the serious photographer (and pro) person looking for topnotch scans comparable to more expensive film scanners.(re: Nikon; Canon, etc.)

I have also cleaned up old family photos of my parents taken 70 to 80 years ago. The results are astonishing. A credit to the Epson scanner and Adobe software.

I'm definitely hooked on the 3170, and recommend it as well as the 3200.

But the 3170 requires less investment.
 

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The truth will out.
There are several software for scanners that will scan multiples at the same time and dissect them into individula shots ( or you can do that yourself ) manually ).

It's the correction that will be time consuming and tricky.

No comment on these
http://www.scanhelp.com/

Photoshop Elements gets good marks here
Elements review

Scanners are so cheap you might look around for something that has the capability of multiple scans.
Good luck. :D :cool:

If you've got that many pictures perhaps the 3200 IS the way to go and it comes with everything you need and certainly will give you the closest to Pro you can get on a desktop.

http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/interactive/Scanners/Epson_3200/page_1.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I AM SEEKING A $0 SOLUTION, please.

archiving is taking the picture as is to save it ?

editing an old family picture is not for me because it looses all its charm when you take away wear and tear...
 

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Darntootin', re the Epson 3170, any foreseeable problems with a new G4 iBook (I only use OS X)?
 

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We're all trying to help...

You may already have the right or adaquate software in Photoshop 5.5.

Try to find settings that provide the quality you want and continue using them.

Macdoc has good advice... if you're looking for levels of quality unavailable either from your scanner, or your spare time... go to the pros.

While I'm able to print out 'decent photos on my printer, when I want quality results, I go to the pro shops.

However, I don't know if you'll be able to easily set up a production-line that pumps in photos and automatically pumps out archival-quality digital reproductions that meet your expectations to transfer to CD's.

But don't give up!

Good luck, and I hope you succeed and enjoy your project.
 

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Here's the problem! You used the wrong word. Archiving usually means a saved copy or an original of very high quality. Since it sounds like this is not what you want, but instead you just want to transfer your photos to a cd in the fastest solution possible. Simple. With what you got, place as many prints that will fit on your flatbed. Bob's your uncle, up to 3 prints at a time. Then when it's in photoshop, select the first picture, copy and paste in a new page, save it as a tiff. and you're done, now repeat for the other 2, and the rest of the photos you want to scan.

You want to go faster? Buy a new Mac, stock it with ram, and a new scanner.

vince
 
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