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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I use a dandy, little third-party app called SSDReporter. My SSD rating has been steadily dropping. I'm now at 80% of new with a wear levelling count of 180.

As I live in a place with plenty of expert options, I'm thinking of getting my 1TB SATA (?) replaced with 2TB. Is this even possible?

If so, I'd appreciate knowing what kind of SSD my Mac has inside so I can buy a replacement. TIA!
 

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As I live in a place with plenty of expert options, I'm thinking of getting my 1TB SATA (?) replaced with 2TB. Is this even possible?

If so, I'd appreciate knowing what kind of SSD my Mac has inside so I can buy a replacement. TIA!

Go here and select your particular model and check all the specs, it should provide you with everything you want to know and maybe a bit more:

For any possible replacement, check out macsales.com


- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, Patrick & polywog. I just got a quote for a 5-year guaranteed 2TB SSD replacement for $400. Once I see what the shop's work is like replacing my swollen battery ($120), I'll consider the SSD.

You're right, polywog, I'm just greedy. I love all the ports on my 2015 MBP & don't really want to donate $3.5k to Apple for a 16inch. But 2TB would sure be fun for a guy with a 5TB MacMini!
 

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Don't get me wrong; that's not what I was implying. I don't know enough about SSDs to say if a wear levelling count of 180 is expected, or low, or high. I don't know if "80% of new" is good or bad for the age of the drive. I do know those number are expected to drop over time.

What I was saying was, it may very well not need replacement at all.
 

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I use a dandy, little third-party app called SSDReporter. My SSD rating has been steadily dropping.
There are some interesting user comments about the software, here:

And for those who might be considering the software, not all SSDs are compatible or supported according to the developer's web page:


- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are some interesting user comments about the software, here:

And for those who might be considering the software, not all SSDs are compatible or supported according to the developer's web page:


- Patrick
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Okay. I went to SSDReporter's website. On their list of SSDs incompatible with their software, they mention only Toshiba in 2013 & 2014 MBPs. (Mine is a 2015.)

I looked under the About This Mac menu. Can't find the brand of internal SSD althought it does say SMART-supported.

Anybody know who supplied 2015 1TB SSDs to Apple???

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you use the System Information (More Info from About this Mac), the type, model and maker of the Drive installed will be shown under Hardware.


- Patrick
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Ah, yes. APPLE SSD SM1024G seems to be Samsung. So works with SSDReporter.
 

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While it is possible to replace the SSD because it is not soldered to the logic board, the connector is proprietary. Very few blade SSDs are compatible to the proprietary connection. In fact SSDs from OWC may be the only one without using an adapter.
 

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What yeeeha says is correct. Roughly after 2009 Apple changed the 2.5" internal hard drives to include a thermocouple output through the SATA plug. If you install a regular 2.5" hard drive or SSD it won't have the thermocouple connection, and your fans won't operate properly. I'm not even sure if the SATA plug will fit. The OWC adapter includes an external thermocouple and special plug adapter to use regular SATA drives with the Apple SATA connector.

My 2009 iMac can use a regular SATA drive (hard drive or SSD), but my 2010 iMac needs the proprietary Apple drive or special adapters.

I thought I'd be smart on my 2010 iMac and remove the SATA DVD drive and replace it with an SSD, since the DVD drive doesn't use a thermocouple. Unfortunately, the SATA connection for the DVD is different from the 2.5" SATA hard drive connector, so you'll need a different adapter for that, although it's probably more readily available.

Apple doesn't make it easy to get at the hard drive in their laptops even if it's possible to change it. OWC has installation videos, so it's best to check those out to see how much work is involved.

I've given up on Mac laptops, and now only use PC laptops. I've had good luck with Dell so far. It's been really easy to upgrade ram and SSD on Dell laptops.
 

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The SSD in a 2015 MBP is not a SATA connection but a proprietary M.2 type connection. I think that OWC has the only SSD with the correct connector, see this . Note where the notch is on the connector. Compared that to a standard M.2 SSD where the notch is at a different position.

My 2009 iMac can use a regular SATA drive (hard drive or SSD), but my 2010 iMac needs the proprietary Apple drive or special adapters.
Removing the factory SSD off a 2015 MBP is not hard. There is a video tutorial on the OWC site. The procedure is much simpler than replacing the SATA drive in an iMac. Drive replacement for a later year iMac is particularly difficult.

Apple doesn't make it easy to get at the hard drive in their laptops even if it's possible to change it.
2015 MBPs are the last model that users can replace something fairly easily. All models after this year have most components soldered to the logic board. If the soldered SSD dies, how to replace it? The entire logic board? This is only economically feasible if there is warranty on the machine, otherwise a new MBP??? How "green" is that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
While my local repair shop which specialises in MacBooks tells me no problem to switch to a 2TB SSD, this makes me worries that the fans will work properly. MBPs running full tilt get pretty hot! Thank you!
 

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While my local repair shop which specialises in MacBooks tells me no problem to switch to a 2TB SSD, this makes me worries that the fans will work properly. MBPs running full tilt get pretty hot! Thank you!

That is why a lot of users use the third party Macs Fan Control.app and even others like myself who just like the innards of their iMac running cooler than where Apple sets the temperature and fan speed settings.

You can download a copy here:


- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks, Patrick, for your suggestion of Macs Fan Control. I've always been wary of messing with the fans. Does the manual for MFC state when it should be deployed & how?

Realised I already have TG Pro but I've only been using it to monitor the temp when it feels crazy hot.
 

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I've always been wary of messing with the fans. Does the manual for MFC state when it should be deployed & how?
One of the nice features of Mac Fan Control if it is running, is that the user cannot set any fan speeds lower than what Apple has dictated. At least under normal situations.

You can of course increase the speed and MFC has an option for setting fixed or automatic speeds based on different neighbouring sensor temperatures.

It's a pretty straightforward and easy to understand utility.


- Patrick
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
One of the nice features of Mac Fan Control if it is running, is that the user cannot set any fan speeds lower than what Apple has dictated. At least under normal situations.

You can of course increase the speed and MFC has an option for setting fixed or automatic speeds based on different neighbouring sensor temperatures.

It's a pretty straightforward and easy to understand utility.


- Patrick
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Perhaps even a rube like me can give it a try. The 2TB switch is still a dream but I'm glad to have these questions to ask about brands, adapters, fans. Thanks, Patrick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Went to Dr. Macbook a few days ago. Guy who taught himself to repair Macs, iPhones & iPads...from YouTube! His full-time business since 2013.

He opened my 2015 MBP right in front of me. Apple-authorised apparent did not clean out my insides (Bangkok is a very dusty city) a year ago on Apple's dime nor did they when I paid them to do so a month ago!

Filthy! Nor did Apple replace the heat-paste which must be done every three years to keep Macs running cool.

New battery installed easily. I asked why Apple insisted on replacing the top-case with battery replacement. He told me they do this to make the repair seem valuable to customers.

Get this: Not only were the Apple screws FREE (WTH, eh!) but my bottom plate was hooped from the swollen battery and he found a dead MBP & replaced it FREE. (Yes, now the SNs don't match but I kept the old plate.)

Apple never told me I had to recalibrate a new battery, either. Maybe why I had two swollen batteries.

Unfortunately, this guy thinks his business model is a dead end now that Apple is making all its units unrepairable.

Wish I'd found Dr Macbook years ago!
 

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Nor did Apple replace the heat-paste which must be done every three years to keep Macs running cool.
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(Yes, now the SNs don't match but I kept the old plate.)
I have never heard that before that be heat paste needs to be replaced every 3 years. But they all seem to be running quite well and cool, and all are well over three years of age.

If you need the serial numbers changed to match the original, Apple provides their authorized service dealers with a utility to do just that if your Fix-It guy has access to Apple's service resources.


- Patrick
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